POLICY

Tourism policy

Andaman and Nicobar island tourism policy

GOVERNMENT OF INDIA MINISTRY OF TOURISM AND CULTURE DEPARTMENT OF TOURISM MARKET RESEARCH DIVISION Final Report On 20 YEAR PERSPECTIVE PLAN FOR SUSTAINABLE TOURISM DEVLOPMENT IN UNION TERRITORY OF CHANDIGARH March 2003 Submitted by India Tourism Development Corporation TLC Marketing Pvt. Ltd. Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu India Private Limited 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh Contents for the 20 Year perspective Tourism Master Plan 1. Executive Summary 1 2. The approach a. Guidelines for developing 20 year perspective Master Plans as issued by the Department of Tourism, Government of India 6 b. Background of Consortium partners 11 i. ITDC ii. Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu iii. TLC Marketing Pvt Ltd c. Approach 15 d. Approach to Environmental Impact Assessment 19 3. Background on the State 21 a. History b. Physical features, Flora and Fauna c. Current infrastructure i. Access – Road, Rail, Air ii. Water & Sewage iii. Power – Electricity iv. Industrial Estates – list of major corporates d. Demographics versus other Northern States District Profiles e. Chandigarh Headquartered Corporate Houses 4. Current Tourism scenario in the State 38 a. Current Chandigarh Tourism Policy b. Inventory of Accommodation c. Current Tourism Statistics 1 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh i. By city ii. Comparative with other Indian States – employment, project spends d. Taxes on Tourism activities e. Fairs & Festivals f. Roles of relevant bodies i. State Tourism Development ii. Urban Development & Town Planning iii. Industrial Development g. Tourism activities of contiguous States 5. Assessment of Tourism Attractions of the State 65 a. How other “City States” have developed tourism b. Inventory of attractions i. Versus criteria ii. By type of tourist and linkages c. Current State Tourism Policy versus National Tourism Policy d. Potential markets and market segments for the State e. Shortlisted projects f. Approach to Environmental Impact Assessments 6. Marketing State Tourism. Case studies of Kerala, Rajasthan and Uttaranchal 79 7. Implementation of shortlisted projects 90 a. Setting up a system for coordination of Departments b. Assessing the economic impact of tourism 2 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh c. Setting up Police outposts d. Setting up a system for accreditisation of shops and transporters e. Creating a Tourist/ Cultural Centre f. Promoting traditional cuisine g. Horse race track & Club h. Amusement park i. Linking the sightseeing j. Conference Centre k. Adventure Tourism and Wildlife Tourism 8. Attracting the Private Sector investments in Tourism 126 9. Summary Tables 147 a. Prioritisation of projects b. Job creation c. Funding of projects d. Visitor numbers e. Economic impact 3 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This 20 year perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh attempts to identify short, medium and long term tourism projects for the Union Territory of Chandigarh using the National Tourism Policy as a guideline. However, all existing and planned projects of Chandigarh Tourism have also been addressed. In these cases, thoughts that complement/ supplement the current thinking have also been listed. We have examined the success of several other “City States” and how they have positioned themselves. Very few, like the Vatican, have the benefit of historical attractions. Some like the Bahamas, Bermuda and Mauritius have natural attractions like beaches. Some traditional trading centers like Hong Kong, Singapore and Dubai have developed as financial hubs. In nearly all cases, however, city states have developed man made attractions with an emphasis on world class recreation and leisure. Gambling – Macau, Monaco & Sun City Horse Racing in Hong Kong & Dubai Sporting events – Singapore, Hong Kong, Dubai, Monaco and Sun City Entertainment events – in all the above, Seychelles etc. Interestingly, most do not rely on immediate neighbouring countries as source markets. Several suggested projects do not have any precedent in India. As such, projections of usage and hence revenues are difficult to make. However, these projects have been endorsed by knowledgeable individuals in the Travel & Tourism industry based on their personal experiences. The Plan makes some observations on current practice. Several specific actions and projects have been recommended. These have been divided into those projects to develop and sustain tourism infrastructure and those that generate visitors. These are summarized in the following pages. In all cases, the involvement of the private sector has been examined. The Plan shortlists the following projects Basic Tourism Infrastructure Projects 1. Setting up a system of coordination between Departments through a “Mission approach” on the lines of Rajasthan’s Rajiv Gandhi Mission on Tourism Development a. Coordination between Chandigarh Tourism/ Chandigarh Hotels/ Town Planning/ PWD (B&R)/ PHD/ Police/ Trade Associations/ NHAI/ Indian Railways b. The Mission should have a mission statement, a manageable number of objectives and specific activity milestones for effective review. 2. Assessing the Economic Impact of Tourism in Chandigarh. Tourism will not get the attention it deserves unless it can demonstrate the economic and social benefits it generates. a. We have suggested annual surveys and the use of multipliers to measure the impact of tourism investments and of tourist spendings 3. Tourism Police outposts. Safety and security are a major concern of travelers. a. We have suggested Tourism Police outposts be set up in the proposed “Tourist Centres” in Chandigarh. The list of locations can be expanded over the Plan period. 4. Accreditisation of Shops and transporters. These are two areas where most tourists feel most insecure in terms of being cheated. a. For shops, we have suggested accreditising shops that have price tagged items and a reasonable return/ refund policy. Shops will carry a Chandigarh Tourism plaque and be advertised in an official map. For Taxis/ auto rickshaws. Must be metered and carry tariff cards. These will be identified with a plaque 5. Cultural/ Tourism Information Centre. This should showcase Chandigarh and be a cross between Dilli Haat and The National Crafts Museum. This center should provide information and reservation capabilities for potential tourists to Chandigarh and neighbouring States. These will provide employment to artisans/ performing artists a. We recommend arts/ crafts, State cuisine and performing arts be showcased b. We recommend some permanent stalls backed by open spaces for stall for celebrating State festivals c. Incorporated into “Recreation & Leisure Centres” in Kishangarh 6. Promoting Traditional Cuisines. Chandigarh has eight neighbouring States each with a rich cultural tradition. We propose that food and cultural festivals be held on a regular basis. We further propose that the existing facility of Kalagram, which has held successful festivals in the past, be utilised. 7. Horse Race Track & Club. There is no good Horse Race track in North India. North India is also home to about 10 stud farms. Hotels in cities like Pune and Bangalore have their week end occupancies boosted by punters from major metros. The Race Club can have other facilities to attract a permanent membership. 8. Amusement park. The Rock Garden/ Sukhna Lake/ Golf Course area is already one hub of tourist activity. An area for an amusement park, for a Sports Complex and a Tourist Health Resort have already been ear-marked in the Chandigarh Master Plan. We propose the Amusement Park be marketed to families traveling Delhi- Shimla with young children to encourage an overnight break. 9. Linking the sightseeing. The distance between the Rock Garden and the area identified for the Amusement park is a long walk but a short auto-rickshaw ride. We propose a vintage narrow gauge railway be set up to link all the points in this Recreation & Entertainment area. 10. Conference Center to attract Business Travellers. Chandigarh Tourism has already identified a plot in Sector 31 next to the CII Regional HQ. We believe that this can cement Chandigarh as the commercial center of North India. 11. Developing the City Centre – Sector 17 – as a social and cultural hub. There is already a trend in this direction. We recommend a partnership between the Sector 17 shop owners and Chandigarh Tourism to develop a calendar of events. We also recommend a relaxation in Excise rules in terms of bar licence costs and hours of operation. 12. Adventure Tourism & Wildlife Tourism. We do not recommend any additional activity in this area other than the ongoing levels. 13. Attracting the Private Sector. We have recommended a package of incentives to attract the Private Sector to invest in tourism related projects in Chandigarh. In all visitor generating projects we have recommended roles for the private sector As a “City State”, Chandigarh does not have the scope – or the space - to develop new projects over a 20 year time span. There is no particular need either in terms of funds or manpower to spread the suggested projects. Guidelines of Dept. of Tourism for 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plans 1. Year wise phasing of investments required having regard to resources available 2. Plan should indicate short term & long term plans, targets and ground realities. 3. Plan should indicate all activities by agency with timeframes 4. Assess the existing tourism scenario in the state/UT with respect to existing traffic levels and inventory of - Natural resources - Heritage & other socio-cultural assets - Quantitative/ demographic factors - Services & infrastructure available 5. Plan should review the status of existing development/ investment for the development of tourism in the region 6. List and evaluate existing potential tourist destinations and centers and categorise them on the basis of - inventory of attractions - infrastructure available - degree of popularity - volume of traffic flow 7. Plan should analyse and categorise existing destinations and centers as - stand alone - part of a circuit - niche attractions for special interests 8. Plan should assess the existing infrastructure levels at identified destinations/ centers in terms of - quality of roads/ transportation facilities - civic amenities - en route transit facilities - boarding and lodging facilities 9. Plan should assess traffic flow for assessment of infrastructure requirements based on - Past growth - Suggested links and integration - Future expected developments - Likely investments from State - Investment climate/ incentive for private sector 10. Plan should attempt indicative cost configuration of likely investment on infrastructure under different heads and prioritise investment needs over 20 years 11. Plan should identify existing as well as new tourism projects including - expansion/ augmentation, - upgradation of services/ facilities - Destinations & centers 12. Plan should undertake product conceptualization cum feasibility for identified projects covering - locational evaluation - schematic product planning - quantification of individual product parameters - assessment of investment levels - project viability 13. Action plan for implementation of identified projects along with development of infrastructure in conformity with - State/ Central policy objectives & guidelines - National development and funding agencies - WTO’s Bali declaration 14. Project wise potential for employment generation including for women 15. Projection of domestic and foreign tourist arrivals for each proposed tourist place 16. Prioritise schemes based on employment potential and tourist arrivals 17. Prepare inventory of existing accommodation including paying guest and proposed needs split by various providers including various State Govt depts 18. Each project to be scutinised and finalized with a view to suggesting State Tourism projects to foreign funding agencies 19. Explore sources of funding such as FIs, TFCI. - Suggest incentives for private sector 20. Suggest institutional machinery in the State to oversee/ supervise the development of Tourism infrastructure 21. Build in facilities for performance of local artistes, cultural troupes 22. Cultural complexes to be suggested with the financial help of the State Dept of culture 23. Handicraft shops to be suggested. These can be run by women 24. Include development of potential health resorts. 25. Plan should have an Executive summary 26. Plan should include attractive packages/ schemes to attract private sector investments 27. Environmental issues shouls be dealt with in sufficient detail and EIA made in respect of new projects 28. Plans should include - carrying capacities - instruments of spatial and land use planning - instruments for architectural controls - strategy for local community participation & protection of cultural identity - Awareness programmes for local 29. Measures for mitigating adverse environmental impact and rehabilitation 30. Strategy for privatisation of State and State Tourism Corp owned tourism related properties 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan THE CONSORTIUM We believe that 20-year Tourism Master Plans require detailed knowledge in several domains. To address this need we have formed a consortium of experts. The consortium comprises of India Tourism Development Corporation – ITDC – Consultancy Division with relevant past experience in Master Plans, Technical Consultancy and project execution. TLC Marketing Pvt.Ltd, a marketing consultancy empanelled by The World Tourism Organisation (WTO), Madrid for various aspects of Tourism Development. TLC Marketing will ensure a balanced tourism plan that is marketable to both developers and the Tourist industry Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu, an international firm of Chartered Accountants and consultants with a wide range of experience in perspective planning in various industries. Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu also have access to their global expertise in the area of Tourism Master Planning. RELEVANT EXPERIENCE India Tourism Development Corporation ITDC was established in 1966 with the objective of developing tourism infrastructure and promoting India as a tourism destination. ITDC has a Consultancy Division which has completed many projects. ITDC has the capability of conducting Techno-Economic feasibility studies, providing Engineering and Technical Services, Mangement Consultancy and Advisory services, consultancy for Adventure Tourism. Assignments already completed by ITDC include Feasibility Reports for hotel projects in Baroda, Calicut, Cochin, Kanpur, Kohlapur, Lucknow, Nagpur, Nainital, Pine, Rishikesh, Varanasi, Raipur, New Delhi, Calcutta, Bangalore and Agartala 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan Tourism Master Plans for Assam, Nagaland, Orissa, Pondicherry, Sikkim, Punjab and Tripura. Technical consultancy for multiple hotels, youth hostels, forest lodges and restaurants Special projects for Rail Yatri Niwas, Indian Railways Catering, College of Combat, Institute of Water Sports at Goa. Project consultancy/ Execution – 28 hotels, the IITTM in Gwalior. TLC Marketing Pvt Ltd. The Directors of TLC Marketing have been involved with Tourism Development for almost 30 years and have had exposure to Tourism Planning in Egypt, Mexico and India. This has been mainly from the project developer’s aspect and are familiar with the requirements of the parties that invest in Tourism Development. They are also familiar with all aspects of tourism including resorts, cruises, timeshare, charters, conferences etc. Some relevant projects undertaken by the directors of TLC Marketing include Study for the India Convention Promotion Bureau on promoting conferences of various sizes to India Assignment with The Planning Commission for Tourism Development Plans for Uttaranchal and Uttar Pradesh. This included the development of a “tourist train” concept Review of Hotel classification norms covering Heritage and Resort hotels for the Govt. of India, Department of Tourism Feasibility studies for business and leisure hotels at over 40 destinations all India. Entry strategy for a hotel company into India looking at mid level hotels. This involves studying business destinations across India Strategy for a chain of Ayurvedic Spas, initially in the North of India Entry strategy into Timeshare for both mid-market and Luxury Resorts Launch of an Outbound Adventure Tour Operator 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu India Private Limited Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu believes that for achieving a client’s business objectives, a variety of knowledge and skills are required. Our national coverage and international experience allows access to professionals in the industry and other areas of specialisations. Our clients include government bodies, non-government organisations, public sector organisations, private companies and international agencies. Brief details of some of our assignments in the hospitality, tourism and entertainment sectors is set out below: International assignments in hospitality and the tourism sector are detailed below: • Privatisation of Hungary Hotels, which comprises some 45 hotels and over 250 restaurants, in association with the Swiss Bank Corporation and Cazenove & Co. Our UK offices worked with our Budapest office on this extensive assignment. • Business valuation of Astir Hotel Company. We assisted the National Bank of Greece on the proposed sales as part of the Government’s privatisation programme. • Advised the public enterprises reform and divestiture secretariat of the Ministry of Finance, Government of Uganda, on the divestiture of Government owned hotels. • Valuation of four state-owned hotels in Morocco prior to their intended privatisation and sale for the Government of Morocco. In conjunction with the Deloitte & Touche Corporate Finance Group, investment memoranda were subsequently prepared to assist in the privatisation process. Indian assignments in Hospitality and Tourism Sector • Strategic advice to Quality Inns Private Limited. • Business plan for a holiday resort based in Kerala. This is under implementation. • Advisory services provided to an international chain of hotels • Business advisory services for Resort Condominiums International • Business advisory services for Singapore based company, for setting up operations in India in the area of serviced apartments and estate development. 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan • Business valuation and due diligence review for Landbase India Limited, • Business advisory services for The Radisson Hotel. • Entry strategy, valuation, negotiations and joint venture identification for Keystone and Venkys. • Trade survey for travel agents and tour operators for a large multinational company. • Review of project parameters and returns compiled for the airport expansion planned for Chennai by the Airports Authority of India. • Economic Feasibility study for setting up a permanent Trade Fair Venue, Madras International Exposition Limited, under the aegis of Federation of Indian Export Organisations (FIEO). Privatisation/ Disinvestment experience • Bharat Heavy Plates & Vessels Ltd., Visakhapatnam • RBL Limited, Calcutta • Tractors Corporation Limited • Bharat Goldmines Limited • Lamps Division of HMT Limited • Paradeep Phosphates Limited Ongoing disinvestments assignments include • IDCOL Cement Limited • The Fertiliser and Chemicals Travancore Limited • Instrumentation Limited • Braithewaite & Co. Limited • Bharat Heavy Plate limited 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan APPROACH Our approach is as follows 1. Review existing Tourism Policy a. This is reviewed in conjunction with stated National Tourism Policy as State Tourism activities should be in synch with National Policy b. Thisis also reviewed in terms of “Best Practice” of other Indian States and some Internationally successful players. 2. Validate Proposed projects a. Plans still to be implemented were reviewed to validate their broad feasibility 3. Suggest new Tourism Products a. This is done with costs, revenues, timelines and responsibilities. b. A broad Economic Impact assessment is made for each suggested product for both primary and secondary effects. Objective Our objective is to develop 20-year Perspective Tourism Master Plans that encourage sustainable tourism by achieving a balance between the growth of tourism on one hand and the impact on natural, heritage and cultural resources on the other. Criteria The Critical Criteria would be that the Plan should be viable. In other words, it should be attractive and marketable to all agencies involved – The traveler, the Travel industry, State and Government agencies, Financial Institutions, Tourism project developers and last but not least to the local population. The Plan will Clearly indicate short term and long term projects and targets Identify agencies involved and the actions required to be taken by each 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan Ensure that each action will have a time frame and an indicative cost Ensure each project will also indicate possible developers and possible sources of funding. Financial structuring arrangements, where relevant will also be indicated. Endeavour to involve the private sector in the development of the plans. This will ensure a buy-in to the finished product. Be based on secondary data – published data, supplied by the State and information obtained in discussions with informed individuals. METHODOLOGY Conduct Inventories Identify existing and potential - attractions - Infrastructure - Access - Environmental impact - Human factors Identify Specific projects Develop balanced Tourist products around each identified attraction Detailed Project analysis Identify each element, the possible developers, sources of funds, incentives etc Final Recommendations Shortlist projects, prioritise over 20 years. - Tourist projections - Employment and other economic benefits Identifying the attractions – the reasons for visiting. 1. The first step would be to make an inventory of all possible visitor attractions both current and potential. These would be studied under a. Long stay – natural and activity resorts such as hill/ beach/ health & fitness/ sports/ wildlife/ shopping and other activities 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan b. Short Stay destination – Business visitors, conferences, weekend stays, pilgrimage c. Short stay itinerary – where the attraction is part of an itinerary and dependent on other links 2. Each attraction will be assessed for “Carrying capacity” using absolute numbers as well as indices such as Tourists/ sq.km, Tourists/ 1000 population. This assessment will use international benchmarks and Best Practices. 3. The Environmental sensitivities will be addressed by a strategy to measure the impact on a. Air quality b. Water and water bodies c. Nature, both flora and fauna d. And on the attraction itself. 4. Based on the above, an assessment of the present and future needs of infrastructural services will be undertaken to cover a. Water b. Electricity c. Sewage and waste disposal d. Communications 5. Based on the potential markets for visiting the attraction, an assessment of the present and future requirements for access will be identified by a. Road b. Rail c. Air d. Water transport 6. There are Human Factors that will also be addressed. These will cover a. Employment b. Inflationary impact c. Cultural impact d. Alienation of locals/ Displacement 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan Identifying and Conceptualising Specific Tourism Products Having assessed the attractions available and the broad feasibility of each, the Plan will e develop a balanced Tourist product around each attraction. The Tourist product consists of the following 1. The attraction – the reason for the visit 2. Accommodation – requirements at each level a. Propose incentives for balanced development 3. Recreational facilities – to supplement the attraction. Eg. a hill resort could have rock climbing, paragliding, river & lake fishing, golf, entertainment and shopping 4. Local transportation a. Airport/ station transfers, shuttles, city sightseeing, public transportation 5. Information a. Signage, guides, brochures, photo ops 6. Wayside amenities a. Rest stops, service stations 7. Safety & Security a. Accreditisation of shops etc b. Tourism police Detailed Analysis and Final Recommendations After identifying the Tourism Products to be developed, the Plan will prioritise them over the 20-year perspective, each project will be analysed to detail The key agencies/ organizations involved in developing the product The investment required Identify possible investors and sources of funds and the processes to access these Possible incentives for the development Identify environmentally threatened places and buildings for restoration. Projection of tourist numbers – domestic and international Employment potential – occupations and income levels Other economic, social and cultural benefits Suggestions on marketing the products Environmental Impact Assessment Studies Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) studies are complex exercises. They are also dependent on the specific projects. For example, projects next to water bodies would require a much deeper assessment of impact on water than other projects that would confine the study to the impact on ground water resources. In the Technical Bid for this project, the Consortium had clearly stated that we are not competent to undertake EIA and would not include them in the final report. However, we are listing out the essential aspects of EIAs. Each attribute must be monitored on a regular basis. Frequency of monitoring may vary from daily for some air samples to annually for soil characteristics. EIAs are best undertaken by specialist organizations like TERI, TARA etc. Attribute Parameters Ambient air quality SPM, RPM, SO2, NO2, CO, CO2, HC etc. Usually 24 hour samples twice a week. Meteorology Surface wind speed and direction, temperatures, relative humidity, rainfall Water quality Physical, Chemical and bacteriological parameters of surface and ground water Ecology Existing flora and fauna. For environmentally sensitive projects, inventory and state of health Noise levels Noise levels in DB(A) Light Lighting levels and impact on fauna, insects Soil Characteristics Parameters relating to agriculture and afforestation potential Land use Trends in land use change for different categories Socio Economic aspects Socio-economic characteristics, labour force characteristics, population statistics and existing amenities, current inflation Geology and mining Geological history, minerals details Hydrology Drainage area and pattern, nature of streams, acquifier characteristics of the area 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh HISTORY India attained Independence in 1947; but in the process the territory of British India was partitioned to form India and Pakistan. The large and prosperous Province of Punjab, was divided and Lahore, its capital, fell within the borders of Pakistan, leaving Indian Punjab without a capital. Those who had been compelled to migrate to India keenly felt the loss of Lahore, a city much loved by its inhabitants. Though there was a temporary secretariat at Shimla in Himachal Pradesh, the political leadership decided on the construction of a modern and accessible capital. In March 1948, the Government of Punjab in consultation with the Government of India approved a 114.59 sq. km tract of land at the foot of the Shivalik Hills in Ropar district as the site of the new capital. The city was named after the Mother Goddess Chandi, (Chandi - Goddess of Power + garh - fortress). The temple of the Goddess is on Chandigarh-Kalka Road. The temple is known by the name of Chandi Mandir. Prior to the construction of Chandigarh, the present site was a typical rural tract, with a rainfed subsistence agricultural economy. It was dotted with 24 village settlements, surrounded by cultivated land parcelled into consolidated irregular, small fields. Each settlement had a number of mango groves remnants of which are still visible in parts of the city. There were banyan or pipal trees within the settlements or near village ponds. The majority of houses were kutcha or partially pucca. Among the physical features, the choes, with their broad, shallow, and dry sandy beds, constituted an important element of landscape. These represented undulations in an otherwise level topography. Hills and mountains provided a panoramic background. The new city was needed not only to serve as a capital but also to resettle thousands of refugees who had been uprooted from West Punjab. India’s first Prime Minister, Jawaharlal Nehru enthusiastically supported the project and took sustained interest in its 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh execution. When he visited the project on April 2, 1952, he declared: “Let this be a new town symbolic of the freedom of India, unfettered by the traditions of the past, an expression of the nation’s faith in the future.... The new capital of Punjab will be christened as Chandigarh-a name symbolic of the valiant spirit of the Punjabis. Chandigarh is rightly associated with the name of Goddess Chandi — Shakti, or power.” The responsibility for the design was given to the French architect Le Corbusier or the Crow. With the help of his cousin Pierre Jeanneret, and that of the English couple Maxwell Fry and Jane Drew (alongwith a number of Indian architects prominent amongst them Chief planner Narinder S. Lamba & Chief Engineer J.C. Verma) Chandigarh, the present capital, came into existence at the foothills of the Shivaliks. Profile of People It was built in 1953 and serves as the capital of two states, i.e. Punjab and Haryana. It is administered by the Central Government and is hence classified as an Union Territory. Since 1986 there has been much talk about officially handling it to Punjab on the basis of demography. The issue however continues to be a matter of discussion with many political disputes. Chandigarh had to be a city of migrants as it was built on the land acquired and cleared of existing settlements. One of its objectives was to rehabilitate persons displaced from Pakistan in 1947. Early settlers in the city were government officials transferred from Shimla, the temporary capital of Punjab after partition and displaced persons from Pakistan in search of a new home. According to 1991 census data, around two-third of the city's population were migrants, the remaining one-third were locally born. About one-third of the migrants hail from Punjab, Uttar Pradesh comes next, having contributed one-fifth of them. Haryana, Himachal Pradesh and Delhi are other important contributors of migrants. The city has 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh attracted migrants from distant states, such as Bihar, Tamil Nadu, West Bengal and Maharashtra. The number of migrants from Nepal is also considerable. Over one-half of migrants to Chandigarh came from other urban places; the rest had a rural base. An urban origin was more typical of migrants from nearby states, such as Punjab, Haryana, Delhi, and Jammu and Kashmir. Migrants from relatively distant states, such as Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, and Tamil Nadu, mostly had a rural origin. According 1991 census the Pakistan-born displaced persons reduced to about 4% of all in-migrants. In the early sixties, they accounted for nearly 40% of the total population. PHYSICAL FEATURES Location Chandigarh is located in the Northern part of India and bound by two states, Chandigarh has Punjab to its north and west and Haryana to its south and east. Chandigarh lies at 30o 44'N latitude, 76o 53"E longitude. 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh Chandigarh Map 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh ROAD MAP Road Transportation The Union Territory of Chandigarh is well served with by an excellent network of roads. The National Highway 21 ( Ambala – Simla) and 22 ( Chandigarh – Manali) link Chandigarh to rest of the country Buses of seven State Road Corporations connect Chandigarh with many cities and towns of neighboring states. The important cities that are connected by buses with Chandigarh are Delhi, Dehradoon, Simla, Manali, Jammu and major Towns of Punjab and Haryana. 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh National Highway Development Project – Golden Quadrilateral & North South East West Corridors Note: Red Line: North South East West Corridors Blue Line: Golden Quadrilateral 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh Chandigarh Rail Network : Rail Transportation Chandigarh is well connected on the rail network. The main railway routes passing through Haryana are: Kalka-Delhi, Chandigarh-Delhi, Kalka-Amritsar, Kalka-Jodhpur,Kalka-Hawrah,Amritsar-Hawrah, Kalka- Sir Ganganagar (Rajasthan). 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh Chandigarh Air Network: Air Transportation Chandigarh Airport is 12 kms. from City Centre, Indian Airlines and Jet Airways connect Chandigarh with Delhi, Leh and Amritsar. Jet has daily flights Delhi – Chandigarh – Delhi. Indian Airlines has a weekly flight Leh – Chandigarh – Leh. 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh Physical Features The geographical area of the U.T. Chandigarh is 114 sq. km. and another 25.42 sq. km. of the hilly area, which has now been declared as 'Sukhna Wildlife Sanctuary' was acquired for soil conservation works. Chandigarh lies at 280 feet above sea level, with an average altitude of 362m (m.s.l.). The location of Chandigarh is unique as it lies in the foot hill region and is also adjacent to the plains of north India. As such it contains the vegetation of the foot hills and the north Indian plains.Chandigarh has 27 villages in its jurisdiction and two satellite towns, Sahibzada Ajit Singh Nagar, conveniently shortened to SAS Nagar, now Mohali, in the Punjab territory and Panchkula in the Haryana territory. Climate Four seasons are noticeable as (i) the rainy season (late-June to mid-September); (ii) the post monsoon or transition season (mid September to mid-November); (iii) the winter of cold season (mid November to mid-March) and (iv) summer or hot season (mid-March to Mid-June). Southwest monsoons commence in late June and usually continue up to mid-September when there are high intensity showers and the weather is hot and humid. May and June are the hottest months of the year with mean daily maximum temperature being about 40oC and mean daily minimum temperature being about 25oC.January is the coldest month with a mean maximum being around 24oC and a mean minimum being around 1.8oC. Fauna In the small and large water bodies there are about a dozen types of fishes, of which Mahseer , Thail and Rohu are more well known. The common frog is Rana tigrina (Indian Tiger Frog) but the other ones are Indian Rice Frog and Indian Burrowing Frog. Two types of tortoise are found. Three four types of lizards are found in buildings, lawns, hedges, etc. and one of these attracts the attention by its brilliant vermilion colour during mating season. Snakes are of quite a many types as Russels Viper, Cobra, Blind Snake, Indian Python, Sand Cobra, Rat Snake etc. 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh Chandigarh has numerous types and the permanent population of birds, which may consist of over 100 different kinds. There are also migratory birds visiting during winter from as far off a region as Siberia. It is estimated that about 100 to 200 types of birds primarily visit Sukhna Lake. The number of migratory birds varies from year to year. The common mammals are Grey Musk, Shrew Monkey, Langur, Flying Fox, Tickellis Bat, Stripped Squirrel, Indian Rat, Common Rat, House Mouse, Porcupine, Indian Hare, Common Mongoose, Stripped Hyena, Jackal, Indian Fox, Nilgai, Blackbuck and Chital. Flora The flora of Chandigarh area is in fact very rich, existence of 860 species of flowering plants in Chandigarh and its neighborhood. This excludes the ornamentals species whose number is anybody's guess because amongst the residents of Chandigarh and neighboring areas garden culture and love for ornamental herbs and shrubs is fast growing. Chandigarh region is home to number of plant species with Medicinal importance. Areas like Shivalik Reserve Forests, Sukhna Catchment area, Rock Garden, Rose Garden, adjoining villages, are among the various places where different kinds of Medicinal plants and few to endangered species of the same can be found. The most fascinating feature of the City's landscaping is perhaps the Tree Plantation along avenues, open spaces, green belts and around building complexes. The total forest cover in Chandigarh is 32.42 sq. km., which forms 23.5% of the total area. The green spaces like Parks, Gardens, Green belts, Leisure valley and Road avenues etc. are in addition to the forest cover of 23.5 %. Thus the green cover in the city is more than 33 % with 26 types of flowering trees and 33 types of evergreen trees in Chandigarh. 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh DEMOGRAPHIC INDICATORS Unit Year Haryana Himachal Jammu & Madhya Punjab Rajasthan Uttar Delhi Chandi All India Pradesh Kashmir Pardesh Pradesh garh Sq.Km. 1982 44212 55673 222236 443446 50362 342239 294411 1483 114 3287263 Share in India Percent 1982 1.34 1.69 6.76 13.49 1.53 10.41 8.96 0.05 0 100 Population Million 1991 16.46 5.17 7.72 66.18 20.28 44 139.11 9.42 0.64 846.3 Share in India Percent 1991 1.94 0.61 0.91 7.82 2.4 5.2 16.44 1.11 0.08 100 Population Density Per sq.km. 1991 372 93.0 76.0 149.0 403.0 129.0 473.0 6352.0 5632.0 274.0 Avg Annual Growth in Percent 1981-91 2.42 1.89 2.54 2.38 1.89 2.5 2.27 4.15 3.54 2.14 Population (1981-91) Population (Projection) Million 2001 20.1 6.8 10.1 81.2 23.8 54.5 174.3 14.4 0.8 1012.4 Urban Population (Projection) Million 2001 27.5 - - 26.9 31.9 25.4 22.7 - - 28.8 Sex Ratio Females/ 1991 865 976 923 931 882 910 879 827 790 927 1000males Urbanisation Ratio Percent 1991 24.6 8.7 25.5 23.2 29.5 23.0 19.8 90.0 89.7 27.0 Urban Density Per sq.km. 1991 5309 2114 3132 6054 4997 2238 4364 14313 8433 4092 Death Rate Per '000 1996 8.1 8 - 11.1 7.5 8.9 10.2 6.05 4.1 9 Live Birth Rate Per '000 1996 28.2 23 - 32.4 23.5 32.3 34 24.6 16.9 27.5 Work Participation Rate Percent 1991 31 42.83 NA 42.82 30.88 38.87 32.20 31.64 34.94 37.46 Male Percent 1991 48.51 50.64 NA 52.26 54.22 49.30 49.68 51.72 54.34 51.55 Female Percent 1911 10.76 34.81 NA 32.68 4.40 27.40 12.32 7.36 10.39 22.25 Source: PHD Chambers of Commerce. 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh MACRO ECONOMIC INDICATORS Unit Year Haryana Himachal Jammu & Madhya Punjab Rajasthan Uttar Delhi All India Pradesh Kashmir Pardesh Pradesh Net State Domestic Product (NSDP) at Factor Cost*: - At current prices Rs. Million 1998-89 383990 49310 58120 610187.8 342900 **586500 1527260 365040 8755940 - At 1980-81 prices Rs. Million 1997-98 75450 $14,190 #17540 147480 101420 @116480 273650 *75740 323820 - At 1993-94 prices Rs. Million 1998-99 254090 NA NA NA NA **379720 971390 251650 NA NSDP Growth 1980-81 prices Percent 1997-98 1.1 NA NA 3.1 2 @0.4 2.2 3.3 87.3 Gross State Domestric Product Rs. Million 1997-98 374270 65040 72930 708320 503580 678050 1299770 445100 NA Per Capita Income at 1993-94 Rs. 1998-99 13084 8864 6658 7350 15504 7694 5890 19091 9739 Prices* 2.00 Sectoral Shares: - Agriculture Percent 1997-98 39 27.6 43 41.4 44 **34.2 37 1 31 - Industry Percent 1997-98 21 32.3 8 26.3 15 **24.088 20 83 28 - Services Percent 1997-98 40 40.1 49 32.3 41 **41.72 43 16 41 Sectoral Growth Rates: - Agriculture Percent 1995-96 -6 9 4 -2 0 -6 2 -40 -1 - Forestry & Logging Percent 1995-96 7 10 5 -12 1 2 -25 - -1 - Fishing Percent 1995-96 16 10 14 15 8 -12 6 3 5 - Mining & Quarrying Percent 1995-96 1 14 10 5 16 -18 1 -58 7 - Manufacturing Percent 1995-96 9 13 3 11 10 6 4 13 14 Per Capita Consumption Rs. 1995 5127 4347 7080 3442 5750 4503 3852 NA NA Expenditure * Note: Owing 10 differences in source material used, figures for different States are not strictly comparable. $: 1995-96 #: 1996-97 @: 1998-99 **: 1999-2000 Source: PHD Chambers of Commerce. 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh MINIMUM MONTHLY WAGES OF WORKMEN Haryana Himachal Jammu & Madhya Punjab Rajasthan Uttar Delhi Pradesh Kashmir Pardesh Pradesh Chandigarh With effect from Jul-00 Jan-99 Mar-93 Mar-00 Nov.99 Feb-00 Jan-96 UNSKILLED 1914.86 1530 NA 825 1796.5 1560 1920 2419 1350 SEMI UNSKILLED A 1964.86 1695 NA 928 1941.55 928 2220 2585 1495 SEMI UNSKILLED B 1989.86 NA NA NA 1875.45 NA NA NA NA SKILLED A 2039.86 1950 NA 1032 2104.55 1032 2660 2843 1657 SKILLED B 2064.86 NA NA NA 1983.45 NA NA NA NA HIGHLY SKILLED 2114.86 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES SCENARIO Recognised Educational Institutions in Northern Region (1998 - 99) State University Professional Colleges for High Middle / Sr.Basic Primary/Jr. * Education general Education School/Jr. School Basic College School HARYANA 5.00 45.00 169.00 3785.00 1788.00 10269.00 HIMACHAL PRADESH 3.00 6.00 557.00 1525.00 1189.00 7732.00 JAMMU & KASHMIR 3.00 12.00 38.00 1351.00 3104.00 10483.00 MADHYA PRADESH 17.00 70.00 413.00 8341.00 21108.00 86858.00 PUNJAB 5.00 64.00 193.00 3325.00 2527.00 12633.00 RAJASTHAN 10.00 70.00 267.00 5633.00 14807.00 35077.00 UTTAR PRADESH 28.00 174.00 676.00 8339.00 20675.00 94476.00 DELHI 11.00 24.00 64.00 1459.00 601.00 2676.00 CHANDIGARH 2.00 7.00 12.00 107.00 34.00 48.00 NORTHERN REGION 84.00 472.00 2389.00 33865.00 65833.00 260252.00 % TO ALL INDIA 35.44 22.17 31.88 30.12 34.62 41.52 INDIA 237.00 2129.00 7494.00 112438.00 190166.00 626737.00 * Includes Deemed Universities and Institutes off National Importance Source: PHD Chambers of Commerce. 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh WATER SUPPLY Items Unit Period 1990-91 1998-99 1999-2K 2000 - 01 1 2 3 4 5 6 No. of Water Works Nos. NA 5 5 5 (Cums.) No. of Metered Connection Nos. 74892 82184 84294 120000 No. of Un-metered Nos. 9360 23464 23656 20241 Connection WATER CONSUMPTION (A) Domestic Kiloliters 67933 5227262 5334897 5943761 (B) Commercial / Industrial Kiloliters 7992 1833205 1881295 4940444 Per Capita Consumption Kiloliters 97 70 67 95 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh POWER Items Unit Period 1990-91 1998-99 1999-2K 2000 - 01 1 2 3 4 5 6 Electricity Consumed Lakh KWH 5240.80 8401.89 8491.04 8715.36 Per capita Consumption KWH 816 988 964 955 Agricultural Consumption Lakh KWH 12.71 25.58 26.59 23.02 Industrial Consumption Lakh KWH 2005.16 1792.34 1865.46 1916.35 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh POPULATION DATA 2001 - CENSUS (P) Population Total Rural Urban Population as per 2001 Persons 900914 92118 808796 Census Males 508224 56837 451387 Females 392690 35281 357409 Decennial Population Growth Absolute 258899 25932 232967 1991 - 2001 %age +40.33 +39.18 +40.46 Density of Population Sex PerSq.Kms 7903 2658 10194 Ratio No.of females per 1000 773 621 792 Males Population of 0-6 years* (I) Absolute 109293 14007 95286 Persons Males 59238 7562 51676 Females 50055 6445 43610 (II) Percentage of Total 12.13 15.21 11.78 Population Persons Males 11.66 13.30 11.45 Females 12.75 18.27 12.20 Literacy : (I) Absolute 647208 59547 587661 Persons Males 384563 40178 344385 Females 262645 19369 243276 (II) Literacy Rate 81.76 76.23 82.36 Persons Males 85.65 81.54 86.16 Females 76.65 67.17 77.53 * 6 years means completed 6 years as on 01.03.2001 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh Chandigarh Corporates Name of the Organisation State Amrit Banaspati Co. Ltd. Chandigarh Bank of Punjab Limited Chandigarh Bhushan Industires Limited Chandigarh Bhushan Steel & Strips Ltd Chandigarh Chandigarh Distillers & Bottlers Ltd. Chandigarh Chandigarh Industrial & Tourism Development Corporation Chandigarh Control & Switch Gear Company Ltd. Chandigarh Dhillon Kool Drinks & Beverages Chandigarh Golden Laminates Limited Chandigarh Gorz-Beckert Asia Ltd Chandigarh Guru Nanak Paper Mills Ltd. Chandigarh IPF - Vikram India Ltd. Chandigarh Indian Acrylics Limited Chandigarh Indo - Swift Limited Chandigarh Industrial Cables India Limited Chandigarh JC Coach Builders Limited Chandigarh Kamla Dials & Devices Ltd. Chandigarh Khandelia Oil & General Limited Chandigarh Metro Expoters Limited Chandigarh Modern Steel Limited Chandigarh Mohan Meaken Limited Mohangram (Chandigarh) Munak Chemicals Limited Chandigarh PCP International Ltd. Chandigarh Punjab Alkalies & Chemicals Ltd Chandigarh Punjab Chemicals & Pharmaceuticals Ltd Chandigarh Punjab State Civil Supplies Corpn. Ltd Chandigarh The Punjab State Co-oop Milk Producer's Federations Ltd Chandigarh Rana Polycot Limited Chandigarh Shivalik Agro Poly Product Limited Chandigarh Singhania & Co. Chandigarh Surya Medicare Limited Chandigarh Variendera Agro Chemicals Limited Chandigarh Winsome Textiles Industries Ltd Chandigarh POPULATION DATA 2001 - CENSUS (P) Population Total Rural Urban Population as per 2001 900914 92118 808796 Census Persons Males 508224 56837 451387 Females 392690 35281 357409 Decennial Population 258899 25932 232967 Growth 1991 - 2001 Absolute %age +40.33 +39.18 +40.46 Density of Population PerSq.Kms 7903 2658 10194 Sex Ratio No.of females 773 621 792 per 1000 Males Population of 0-6 years* (I) Absolute 109293 14007 95286 Persons Males 59238 7562 51676 Females 50055 6445 43610 (II) Percentage of 12.13 15.21 11.78 Total Population Persons Males 11.66 13.30 11.45 Females 12.75 18.27 12.20 Literacy : (I) Absolute 647208 59547 587661 Persons Males 384563 40178 344385 Females 262645 19369 243276 (II) Literacy Rate 81.76 76.23 82.36 Persons Males 85.65 81.54 86.16 Females 76.65 67.17 77.53 * 6 years means completed 6 years as on 01.03.2001 Name of the Organisation State Amrit Banaspati Co. Ltd. Chandigarh Bank of Punjab Limited Chandigarh Bhushan Industires Limited Chandigarh Bhushan Steel & Strips Ltd Chandigarh Chandigarh Distillers & Bottlers Ltd. Chandigarh Chandigarh Industrial & Tourism Development Corporation Chandigarh Control & Switch Gear Company Ltd. Chandigarh Dhillon Kool Drinks & Beverages Chandigarh Golden Laminates Limited Chandigarh Gorz-Beckert Asia Ltd Chandigarh Guru Nanak Paper Mills Ltd. Chandigarh IPF - Vikram India Ltd. Chandigarh Indian Acrylics Limited Chandigarh Indo - Swift Limited Chandigarh Industrial Cables India Limited Chandigarh JC Coach Builders Limited Chandigarh Kamla Dials & Devices Ltd. Chandigarh Khandelia Oil & General Limited Chandigarh Metro Expoters Limited Chandigarh Modern Steel Limited Chandigarh Mohan Meaken Limited Mohangram (Chandigarh) Munak Chemicals Limited Chandigarh PCP International Ltd. Chandigarh Punjab Alkalies & Chemicals Ltd Chandigarh Punjab Chemicals & Pharmaceuticals Ltd Chandigarh Punjab State Civil Supplies Corpn. Ltd Chandigarh The Punjab State Co-oop Milk Producer's Federations Ltd Chandigarh Rana Polycot Limited Chandigarh Shivalik Agro Poly Product Limited Chandigarh Singhania & Co. Chandigarh Surya Medicare Limited Chandigarh Variendera Agro Chemicals Limited Chandigarh Winsome Textiles Industries Ltd Chandigarh 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh Chandigarh Tourism Policy Chandigarh Tourism has declared the following vision “ Tourism as a major industry in Chandigarh is to be developed by Providing leadership, organizational and strategic direction, Improving the quality of tourism products, Developing places of tourist interest, Providing necessary facilities for all categories of tourist and Marketing Chandigarh’s Tourism products internationally and domestically So as to provide employment and economic, environmental, social and cultural benefits to the citizens of the city beautiful – Chandigarh” In the new economic scenario, Chandigarh Tourism has recognized the need to involve the private sector in the development of tourism infrastructure in conjunction with the Government. The following activities are included in the ‘Tourism Industry’ Accommodation facilities Restaurants and fast food facilities Transportation facilities Tourist entertainment Souvenirs With this background, the objectives have developed as 1. Employment generation. Tourism generates both direct and indirect employment 2. Attract private investment 3. Preserve heritage and tradition. As Chandigarh is a new city, the traditions are related with gardens and festivals 4. Preserve the environment 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh 5. Diversification of the Tourism product into adventure sports, entertainment, leisure etc. 6. To provide adequate publicity both domestic and international 7. Create accommodation facilities – renovate and upgrade existing facilities 8. Develop human resources for Hospitality and Tourism. The following strategic projects have been suggested to implement these objectives 1. Develop Chandigarh as a convention city – attract the MICE segment 2. Eco- tourism wildlife park around the Sukhna Bird sanctuary 3. Sound & Light show at the Rock Garden 4. Further development of Tourist amenities at Sukhna Lake 5. Amusement park 6. Translites and signeages for the convenience of tourists 7. Tourist information center to house other State Tourism offices as well as railways, airlines and trade associations 8. Promotion of Rail Tourism – in particular on the Kalka-Shimla line 9. Promotion of Kalagram as a showcase for the Northern States 10. Development of innovative tourism packages o Buddhist places o Pilgrimages - Hindu and Sikh o Holiday packages to Hill stations o Heritage packages o Adventure packages o NRI packages 11. Promotion of off-season tourism 12. Special Tourism packages for NRIs 13. Development of Chandigarh as a Film City 14. Integrate the police to safeguard the interests of tourists 15. Promotion of week end golf packages 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh Another major initiative has been an attempt to integrate Tourism Development in the Northern States of Punjab, Haryana, Himachal Pradesh and Jammu & Kashmir via a ‘Tourism Advisory Board’. The Board would have the Tourism Secretaries of the participating states as members, the Chairmanship rotating between the States. The Board would also have prominent persons from the Tourism industry as members. The primary role is seen as Working out a strategy for integrated approach for promotion of tourism in the region Promotion of interstate Tourism via programmes such as Tourism Trade fairs & Exhibitions Setting up joint information centers Organising interstate package tours Collaboration on Tourism promotion schemes Joint participation in Traevl Industry Trade fairs Joint cultural festivals Linkages of websites Part of this initiative would be to declare a Special Tourism Area for a radius of 100 Km around Chandigarh with the prime objective of allowing the free movement of designated tourism vehicles. 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh FAIRS & FESTIVALS Chandigarh citizens celebrate several festivals that are uniquely their own. The Festival of Gardens This is a three-day extravaganza organized in the last week of February; included on the national calendar of festivals. Initially called the Rose Festival it intended to encourage people to stroll through the Rose Garden and enjoy the sight of the blooms. Each year the festival grew: now it includes performances of music and dance, both classical and folk, flower shows, events for children, exhibitions by local artists, photographers and craftsman and a wide range of amusements. Since 1997 it is known as the Festival of Gardens. The city pulls out all the stops for this celebration, reminiscent of ancient India's Vasant Utsav in honor of spring. April Fools' Day (April 1) On this day poets from all over the country gather at Chandigarh to recite verses in a jocular vein. Even those who do not ordinarily enjoy poetry look forward to the Maha Moorkh Sammelan, or Conclave of Colossal Fools. No other city in India hosts such a gathering. Baisakhi Baisakhi is the first day of the new year in the traditional Vikrami calendar, it celebrates the wheat harvest, and it is one of the high points of the year for Sikhs as it is anniversary of the founding of Khalsa. As the capital of two basically agrarian states, Punjab and Haryana, this day sees festivities organized by both the state governments as well as the Administration of the UT, and of course many institutions in the city. 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh The Mango festival This festival is held in June. Mango-growers from all over India are invited to enter their prize fruits in the various competitions. Visitors to the fair can see and taste all the traditional varieties of the fruit as well as the latest hybrids from the agricultural universities. It is also an occasion for agro-industries, and food industries processing mango into jams, pickles and canned fruit to display their wares. TEEJ Teej is a traditional holiday celebrated by women in the middle of the monsoon season-generally around the first week of August. The Rock Garden with its swings and pavilions is the festival venue and the day is basically a grand picnic with songs and dances, purchase of new bangles, painting the hands with mehndi. The Indo-Pak Mushaira This gathering in December brings together poets from India and Pakistan. The significance of this event is felt especially by the older generation whose memories go back to the years before the partition of India. For the younger generation it brings home the deep commonalties of language and culture that unite the people of two nations. The Chrysanthemum Show - in December turns the Terraces Flower Garden in the city's Sector 33 into a multi-coloured wall-to-wall carpet of chrysanthemums. Hundreds of varieties of the flower are on display and city gardeners vie for coveted honours in the competitions. The Plaza Carnival 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh This Carnival is on every-Saturday-night is held on an open-air stage set up in Sector 17's central piazza. The weekly three-hour programme draws a large crowd and provides an opportunity for talented local singers, dancers, magicians, comedians, actors and acrobats to do their stuff. The Chandigarh Carnival This carnival is a three-day event celebrated in the second week of November shortly before or after Nehru's birth anniversary on November 14,otherwise known as Children's Day. The carnival opens with a colourful procession, which everyone is encouraged to join. The carnival is a time for students to show their talent (or simply have fun) and elders too participate in a number of competitions and exhibits. 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh Roles of relevant bodies in Tourism The main bodies that generate and cater to leisure and business travel to the State are 1. CITCO – Chandigarh Industrial & Tourism Corporation 2. Urban Development and Town Planning Chandigarh Tourism. The Chandigarh Industrial & Tourism Development Corporation Limited (CITCO) was set up in 1974 for construction and allotment of industrial sheds and for supply of iron & steel to the industries in Chandigarh. Its original name was Chandigarh Small Industries and Development Corporation Limited (CSIDC). The Chandigarh Administration transferred Hotel Mountview and other cafeterias to the Corporation in 1982. It's name was first changed to Chandigarh Industrial & General Development Corporation Limited (CIGDC) and finally to Chandigarh Industrial & Tourism Development Corporation Limited (CITCO). In terms of Tourism responsibilities, Chandigarh Tourism plays both developmental and operational roles. Its prime areas of responsibility are 1. Promotion of Chandigarh and its attractions as destinations 2. Creation of tourism related infrastructure 3. Development of accommodation and restaurants 4. Activities pertaining to the preservation of art, culture, history and heritage of the State 5. Establishment of recreation and leisure facilities 6. Tourism related human resource development 7. Promotion of package tours 8. Information and signage 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh Chandigarh Tourism is a profitable venture. A short overview of its performance over various activities is given below Unit Hotel Mountview 1997-98 Rs. - Lacs Sale Profit 824.55 215.71 1998-99 Rs. - Lacs Sale Profit 891.57 266.84 1999-00 Rs. - Lacs Sale Profit 1093.08 323.97 Hotel Shivalikview Hotel Parkview Chef Lakeview 677.08 127.68 111.28 145.49 9.98 16.04 651.46 121.22 117.20 81.74 -47.61 12.43 673.31 124.21 160.69 91.11 -4.60 39.98 Chef Bus Stand Rock Garden Canteen Canteens Tours & Travels 41.56 5.44 9.50 10.47 -14.55 -3.00 -18.59 -15.48 38.50 6.61 17.41 9.80 -10.07 0.14 -23.02 -15.24 36.89 1.24 16.88 7.96 -10.84 -0.54 -23.03 -13.54 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh URBAN PLANNING The Department is headed by the Chief Architect who is the Ex-officio Secretary, Urban Planning. The Department consists of two wings. Architectural Wing Town planning Wing Architectural Wing This wing has five basic duties: • To design buildings for the Chandigarh Administration and work entrusted to it by various departments of the Central and State governments and autonomous bodies • To Co-ordinate with the various wings of the Engineering Department both in the planning and construction phases and to incorporate structural designs and other engineering services into the buildings. • Architectural supervision during the course of construction of works designed by the deptt. • To scrutinize building plans submitted to the Estate Office for approval of the Administration and to inspect commercial buildings for issuance of completion certificates by the Estate Office. The Chief Architect's jurisdiction encompasses the entire Union Territory. Town Planning Unit The Town Planning Unit consist of Senior Town Planner with supporting team of Divisional Town Planner, asstt, Town Planners and other draftsmen in different grades. The Senior Town Planner is responsible for implementing the Chandigarh Master Plan proposals. He prepares project reports dealing with different aspects of the development of the city and its surrounding area. He plans 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh Industrial Development As this, along with Chandigarh Tourism, is part of CITCO, there is complete coordination within their roles and no overlaps. The Corporation was set-up in 1974 primarily for supplying raw-material to the small scale industries and for construction and allotment of industrial sheds. Some more activities were added subsequently. The details of the industrial activities in chronological order are as under: Year Activity 1974 Construction and allotment of industrial sheds. Supply of iron and steel to the SSI Units. 1978 Industrial Development and Facility Centre ( IDFC ). This Centre was setup with the assistance of Industries Department . 1979 Emporium as marketing outlet for the products of SSI units. 1992 Supply of Petroleum products- Agents for IPCL (Indian Petro Chemical Limited) 2000 Consignment Agency of Steel Authority of India Limited (SAIL) 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh the Phase-II and II sectors and the left out pockets of Phase I and II with the aim of bring areas under intensive utilization. HE scrutinizes building plans and cases concerning construction in areas falling under the Periphery Control Act. He studies Urban trends, which will require plan revisions and plans for changing traffic and transportation needs. Rehabilitation and resettlement of squatters settlements and other rehabilitation housing projects come under his purview and he also outlines the statutory zoning plans in respect of land for commercial/residential/cultural/educational purposes. In accordance with the Estate Officer, the Senior Town Planner releases land for auction and sets plinth levels. He provides guidance to the Chandigarh Housing Board and prepares plan for the development schemes of Manimajra. He is involved in planning for the integrated development of the Chandigarh Inter-State Region. The Senior Town Plan's jurisdiction encompasses the entire area of the Union Territory of Chandigarh. 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh Activities of contiguous states UTTAR PRADESH After the formation of separate hill state of Uttaranchal, UP doesn’t account for any breath taking topography as is associated with Uttranchal. Its most important physical feature is the River Ganges, which traverses the length of the state and accounts for some of the oldest cities/ regions of the world. Rivers are a significant physical feature and tourism resource. All important tourist destinations of UP have an attractive riverfront that can be developed. UP Government is concentrating on improving river-based experience by way of improving ghats, improving the experience at the ghats, encouraging water sports, river cruise, Better destination management at key tourism centers by way of urban decongestion, traffic management, ghats and river experience improvement and better accommodation facilities at Varanasi ,Allahabad and Agra. Product Innovation and better packaging of existing products a. The Bundelkhand area has a rich inventory of heritage properties. Lack of connectivity, infrastructure and communication facilities makes it difficult to create a tourism experience. Plans are to start a tourism train to provide connectivity, accommodation and basic infrastructure in a single product. It also provides a “theme” that is attractive and marketable. b. Agra as an International convention and events center. Plans to set up a international size convention facility. Agra has the advantage of instant international positive name recognition. It is well connected with Delhi gateway. Agra has numerous monuments besides Taj Mahal and numerous possible excursions extensions. Agra has ample accommodation in different ranges. 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh UTTRANCHAL Tourism has been identified to have the potential to become the main stay of Uttranchal’s economy, and needs to be developed in planned and time bound manner. To achieve this objective the state has taken following steps The state has constituted a high-level Tourism Development Board, which will replace the existing tourism directorate. The role of the board will be a. Formation of a policy and strategy for development of tourism in Uttranchal b. Preparation of plans and guidelines for developing and strengthening tourism related infrastructure in the state c. Establish standards/norms for and forming policy guidelines for various tourism activities d. Strategy for mobilizing private sector participation and investments in the private sector. e. Single window Information and assistance center. Outsourcing Expertise The Uttranchal tourism board empanelled more than hundred experts/ agencies to seek services of specialists and consultancy agencies. The board identified seven projects and awarded the work to different agencies. These projects are master plans, which dovetail all developments and have a long-term perspective for sustainable tourism products. Destination Management The existing tourism centers need destination management plans to maintain and improve their effectiveness. Haridwar, Mussoorie, Nainital and Rishikesh being the key hubs through which pass the maximum number of tourists in the region would require immediate attention. 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh Plans need to be made for better connectivity, city decongestion, improvements of accommodation etc. The master plan is being prepared for the Char Dham route, and same might be planned for other important destinations mentioned above. New Destinations New tourism destinations have been identified which will develop and marketed as spokes to hubs. These new destinations will also help in decongesting the hubs. Private Sector Participation The areas and opportunities have been identified for the private sector which are development of accommodation facilities for different categories of tourists, tourist resorts, specialized food restaurants, facilities for adventure sports, amusement parks etc. To make these investment opportunities attractive special incentives and concessions have been planned. 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh RAJASTHAN Tourism is a significant contributor to the economy to Rajasthan economy. Rajasthan has adopted the mission approach for tourism sector to accord very high priority and ensure planned and time bound growth and development of tourism industry in the state to make it a truly “people’s industry” in Rajasthan. a. Rajasthan has estimated tourist accommodation of 19000 rooms in 772 hotels and as per assessment of the state tourism department, 20000 additional rooms will be required by year 2005.The state has decided to encourage more private investment. The state will encourage private investment in developing ancient buildings and heritage properties as tourist resorts; this will have dual advantage of preservation of heritage properties and additional accommodation. b. Traditionally Rajasthan has been depending on it heritage to attract tourists. Rajasthan Government is looking at ways and means of enhancing the tourist products. o The State has rich forest reserves and national parks like Sariska, Bharatpur- Ghana and Rathambore. Other areas, which have the potential for Wildlife, will be promoted. o Rajasthan has rich and varied heritage of handicrafts, handlooms and other products, which are appreciated by and purchased by tourists visiting the State. Efforts will be made to improve direct access of tourists to artisans. RTDC will develop shopping arcades in their existing properties and provide space to artisans to display and market their products. Efforts will be made to set up Shilpgrams and a Handicrafts Museum. o Experience has shown that Fairs and festivals have great tourist appeal and promotional value. Some of the fairs and festivals have become internationally popular like the Pushkar and Dessert Festival, 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh Jaisalmer. The Government proposes to consolidate the facilities at such places to make these fairs and festivals more attractive. c. Destination Management o In view of possible exploitation of tourists, Government of may enact a suitable legislation for regulating tourism trade. o The Department of tourism will be empowered to license and inspect such establishments as are engaged in providing services of to tourists. Since there is an existing procedure for classification of Hotels, such establishments will not be brought under the purview of the legislation to avoid duplication of regulatory procedures. o Complaints received through tourists may be readdressed through Tourist Assistance Force. o Care will be taken to avoid unrestricted entry of tourists beyond the carrying capacity of National Parks and Sanctuaries. DELHI Delhi has a rich inventory of heritage properties. Delhi is one of the two major gateways to the country. Delhi has done very little to promote tourism in the state. This tourist has to come to Delhi for visiting all the popular tourist destinations in North India. Delhi is planning to set up 6/8 more Delhi Hatt type of facilities in different parts of Delhi. Efforts are being made to rejuvenate Tuglakabad Fort area. PUNJAB Punjab has done very limited to promote tourism in the state. It has limited heritage assets and the same have been neglected. The Golden Temple or Darbar Sahib is the most frequented pilgrimage center of the state. The Patiala Fort houses the National Sports Academy.Lately the Sheesh Mahal has been used as a backdrop to organize music concerts and contests and the area around the property has been improved. 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh CHANDIGARH HOTELS HOTEL SECTOR AMAR 22 A ALANKAR 22 A AROMA 22 C CHANDIGARH 22 C CLASSIC 35 C DIVYADEEP 22 B G.K. INTERNATIONAL 35 C HERITAGE 35 C HIMANI'S 35 C JASMINE 35 C JAMES PLAZA 17 JULLUNDHAR 22 B KAPIL 35 B KC RESIDENCY 35 D KWALITY RESIDENCY 22 A Le CROWN 35 B MAYA PALACE 35 B METRO 35 35 C MONARCH 35 B MOUNTVIEW 10 B PANKAJ 22 A PARK INN 35 PICCADILY 22 B REGENCY 35 B RIKHI 35 B SAMRAT 22 D SHIVALIK VIEW 17 D SOUTHEND 35 C SUNBEAM 22 B CHANDIGARH YATRI 24 B NIWAS PRESIDENT 26 C SOLITAIRE NAC Shivalik Enclave PANCHKULA HOTELS North Park Panchkula - Shimla Road Prabhat Inn *** Panchkula - Shimla Road Oscar Regency Panchkula - Shimla Road Vikrant Panchkula - Shimla Road ZIRAKPUR HOTELS Mark Royal (10 Kms from Panchkula) Bristol (10 Kms from Panchkula) Shagun (10 Kms from Panchkula) Grow Green (10 Kms from Panchkula) NO OF ROOMS 16 12 30 16 14 14 28 14 17 14 N/A 16 13 26 14 16 26 16 14 156 14 26 48 25 16 16 13 57 20 26 30 20 12 50 30+ Info. Not avail. 12 (approx) 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh State Luxury tax on room Qualifying rate -Rs Actual/ Published Sales tax on Food Sales Tax on softbeverages Sales tax on Liquor Annual Bar licence -Rslakhs Excise onconsumption- BeerRs Excise onconsumption-liquorRs Electricity / unit Elcetricity demandMonthperKVA/ 10 for Andhra Pradesh 5% 300 pub 8% 8% 8% hotel nil nil 4.61 108 Assam 20% all pub 7% nil nil 0.5 1.95+75% 3.75+75% 3.70+ 5% 70 Arunachal nil nil nil nil nil nil 0.5 nil nil 2.15 Bihar 7% 151 act 6+1% 11+1% 25+2% 3 1 6.75 2.92 125 Delhi 10% 500 act 8% 10% 20% 4.5 to 7.5 5.25 to 7.0 Goa 15% 500 pub 15% 20% on foreign 0.6 2.90 to 3.30 110 Gujarat 20% 500 act 12% 0.2 3.5 +45% Haryana nil nil NA 10% 20% 20% 5.75 4.02 Himachal Pradesh 10% 150 pub 8% 33% on out of state 0.7 2.8 Jammu & Kashmir 2% 8% 32% 1 3.18 Karnataka 15% 1,000 pub 10% 10% Indian 10% Foreign 60% 2.08 6.2 Kerala 15% 500 act 9% Local 5% imported 13 2 100% Madhya Pradesh 10% all act 9% 10% nil 2 3.63 122 Maharashtra 10% 1,200 act 20% 20% 20% 1.18 to 3.71 2.64 Orissa nil nil nil 8% Indian nil imported 20% 1.5 3.45 Punjab nil nil nil 9% nil nil 1.2 7.95 88 3.39 120 Indian nil imported Rajasthan 8% 1,200 act 14% 50.6% 1.5 to 6.0 11 31 3.72 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh State Luxury tax on room Qualifying rate -Rs Actual/ Published Sales tax on Food beverages Sales Tax on soft Sales tax on Liquor - Rs lakhs Annual Bar licence Beer - on Rs consumption Excise liquor - on Rs consumption Excise Electricity / unit per KVA/ Month Elcetricity demand Sikkim nil nil nil 8% nil nil 0.06 2.5 Tamil Nadu 20% all Pub 8% 2.2 4 Uttaranchal 5% Uttar Pradesh 5% 1,000 act 8% out of state 32.6% 8 per hotel 8 48 4.13 West Bengal 10% a/c act 17% imported 30% daily 1 to 25 30 to 175 4.88 Chandigarh nil Source : FHRAI 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh Transport taxes Token tax/ qtr Tax perseat/km Tax per day Tax per month Tax per week Total permonth All IndiaTouristPermitpermonth Delhi 35 seat coach 1675 560 1600 Ambassador 850 285 Esteem 1300 433 Haryana 35 seat coach a/c 8.53 4000 35 seat coach non a/c 8.31 Ambassador/ Esteem 875 291 Qualis- 9 seats 3175 1058 Punjab 35 seat coach 3175 nil Ambassador/ Esteem 800 267 Qualis- 9 seats 1000 333 UP & Uttaranchal 35 seat coach 14500 485 4835 Ambassador/ Esteem 730 243 Qualis- 9 seats 4350 1450 Gujarat 35 seat coach 9000 36000 Rajasthan 35 seat coach 20610 20610 2025 Ambassador 1000 1000 Qualis- 9 seats 3400 3400 Himachal Pradesh 35 seat coach 12000 4000 4000 Ambassador/ Esteem 386 130 Qualis- 9 seats 3250 1085 Madhya Pradesh 35 seater coach 3400 21600 Qualis/ Ambasador 210 Source : All India Transporters Association/ PHD Chamber of Commerce Employment in Hotels & restaurants Own Account Ent Establishments Total Number Employed Number Employed Number Employed Andhra Pradesh 69979 131,082 26504 134,009 96483 265,091 Arunachal 446 823 1029 4,740 1475 5,563 Assam 12005 18,186 14713 56,020 26718 74,206 Bihar 39822 62,201 21599 81,870 61421 144,071 Delhi 10917 14,822 10642 65,402 21559 80,224 Goa 1740 2,578 1189 9,331 2929 11,909 Gujarat 14759 22,622 12945 66,042 27704 88,664 Haryana 11971 15,360 5426 18,682 17397 34,342 Himachal Pradesh 7931 9,937 3214 11,651 11145 21,585 Jammu & Kashmir Karnataka 60093 103,972 34429 160,522 94522 264,494 Kerala 71472 101,290 27483 103,657 98955 204,947 Madhya Pradesh 39248 57,836 24412 96,007 63660 153,843 Maharashtra 47828 73,828 52237 312,763 100065 386,591 Manipur 2174 4,400 794 3,169 2968 7,569 Meghalaya 2222 4,430 3100 11,767 5322 16,197 Mizoram 1010 1,635 619 1,706 1629 3,341 Nagaland 589 1,301 949 4,179 1538 5,480 Orissa 34811 60,779 18007 68,292 52818 129,071 Punjab 10006 13,503 6694 23,984 16700 37,487 Rajasthan 29426 38,606 14820 50,224 44246 88,830 Sikkim 261 593 398 1,809 659 2,402 Tamil Nadu 85563 139,566 36637 167,673 122200 307,239 Uttar Pradesh 73911 103,649 28760 102,230 102671 205,879 West Bengal 68179 92,019 26508 115,903 94687 207,922 Andaman & Nicobar Chandigarh Daman & Diu Dadra & Nagar Haveli Lakshwadeep Pondicherry Source : department of Tourism Transport taxes Token tax/qtr Tax perseat/km Tax per day Tax permonth Tax per week Total permonth All IndiaTouristPermitpermonth Delhi 35 seat coach 1675 560 1600 Ambassador 850 285 Esteem 1300 433 Haryana 35 seat coach a/c 8.53 4000 35 seat coach non a/c 8.31 Ambassador/ Esteem 875 291 Qualis- 9 seats 3175 1058 Punjab 35 seat coach 3175 nil Ambassador/ Esteem 800 267 Qualis- 9 seats 1000 333 UP & Uttaranchal 35 seat coach 14500 485 4835 Ambassador/ Esteem 730 243 Qualis- 9 seats 4350 1450 Gujarat 35 seat coach 9000 36000 Rajasthan 35 seat coach 20610 20610 2025 Ambassador 1000 1000 Qualis- 9 seats 3400 3400 Himachal Pradesh 35 seat coach 12000 4000 4000 Ambassador/ Esteem 386 130 Qualis- 9 seats 3250 1085 Madhya Pradesh 35 seater coach 3400 21600 Qualis/ Ambasador 210 Source : All India Transporters Association/ PHD Chamber of Commerce 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh Approach to Assessment of Attractions Successful tourism products are those developed to meet the demands of existing and potential markets. These market segments have also been analysed. While analyzing the attractions of Chandigarh, we kept in mind both Chandigarh Tourism Policy and the National Tourism Policy. The approach has been 1. Identification of market segments 2. Listing of all attractions in Chandigarh 3. Mapping the relationship between Chandigarh Tourism and National Tourism Policies 4. Study of “Best Practice” in other City States 5. From the above, a shortlisting of projects. 1 Fitness Trail High Court The Open Hand/ Dove – symbol of Chandigarh Rock Garden scuplture Marketing State Tourism Three case studies are attached – Kerala, Rajasthan and Uttaranchal – representing “Best Practice” in the Indian context. Recently, Maharashtra has been very active in promotion. Some pertinent observations are 1. Get the basics in place. In other words set the right conditions for enhancing infrastructure for tourism. Some specific actions taken a. Common approach by all Govt.Departments. Rajasthan’s Rajiv Gandhi Mission and Uttaranchal’s Tourism Development Board ensure that various Govt.Depts and private sector are involved in Tourism plans b. Giving Tourism Industry status. Kerala did this in 1986, Rajasthan in 1989 c. Outsource expertise. Uttaranchal and Rajasthan both utilize professionals for surveys and feasibility studies d. Involve Private sector. Kerala Tourism formed JVs with two major hotel chains to attract investments. It has further set up a Tourism Investment Agency. Rajasthan offered further assistance to develop Heritage hotels. Uttaranchal has earmarked accommodation, restaurants, adventure sports, amusement parks for private development. e. Develop Human resources. Rajasthan and Uttaranchal are encouraging private sector to set up Hotel management and Food craft institutes. There is emphasis on guide training and certification. Uttaranchal plans specialist training facilities for adventure sports. Kerala set up an Institute of Tourism & Travel Studies in 1988 in addition to the IHMCT in Kovalam. f. Emphasis on civic infrastructure. Identified by Uttaranchal as a key area. 2. Enhance the Tourism product. Apart from traditional reasons for visits a. Kerala – Ayurveda and Traditional festivals like Boat races, Elephant March, Nishagandhi Dance festival. Also developing a new Hill Station b. Rajasthan – Direct access to Handicrafts and Handloom artisans, Fairs and festivals, Wildlife. c. Uttaranchal – Adventure sports 3. Concentrate on a few destinations/ activities a. Kerala – Ayurveda, Calicut-Kasargod, Quilon-Alleppey b. Uttaranchal – four hubs of Haridwar, Mussoorie, Nainital and Rishikesh. Adventure sports c. Goa – holidays d. Rajasthan - Heritage 4. Manage Destinations. Involve host population – Rajasthan positions this as a ‘peoples industry’, better connectivity, city decongestion, Safety & Security of tourists – Kerala thinking of an insurance scheme, restricting entry into sensitive areas like National Parks, Registration of establishments catering to tourist needs 5. Product Positioning. Each State needs to develop a USP. a. Kerala – God’s own Country b. Uttaranchal – Every season is the reason c. Goa – 365 days on holiday 6. Promotion to target markets. a. Market segmentation – Relevant market segments, both domestic and international, should be identified geographically and by reason for visit. Eg. Kerala also targets NRIs b. Distribution – Ability to reserve hotels/ tours in source markets c. Sales - Participation in domestic and International trade fairs, familiarization trips for identified agents, sales offices in key markets d. Communications - Focused advertising in trade and travel related media, PR, Interactive websites, e-mail magazines, sweepstake prizes for high profile contests, familiarization trips for identified journalists i. Kerala has hired an agency in the US e. Database maintenance f. Marketing alliances – on-line airlines/ transporters, neighbouring States, destination co-op marketing. How other City States/ small countries position themselves Chandigarh is similar in situation to the city states and small countries around the world. The chart below attempts to analyse some of the more successful city states in terms of their drawing power City State Attractions Singapore Trading - Was a trading post to the Far East – Now a Financial hub – Connectivity to the world Manmade attractions – Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, Sentosa Island & ropeway, Acquarium – Shopping, night markets – Golf Hongkong – now part of Trading China, but mainly unchanged Shopping Sports – Horse racing, rugby Macau Gambling – Casino/ Jai Alai Formula 1 races Monaco Gambling Casino & entertainment Formula 1 races Dubai Trading – similar to Singapore Shopping Sports – horse racing, power boats, golf, tennis, cricket Events Mauritius/ Bahamas/ Bermuda Beaches Off-shore companies Sun City, South Africa Casino, Golf,water sports, events Very few City States have the benefit of historical attractions such as at the Vatican. Some like Bahamas, Bermuda and Mauritius have the natural attractions of beaches. Most, however, have had to depend on manmade attractions. It is obvious that those city states that have had a history of trading, have managed to develop themselves as World Financial Centers. As part of this development, they have installed infrastructure for communications, in particular, very broadband channels for Internet. Another off shoot of this development is the growth in media. Dubai, in fact, is building a media city. However, the one striking feature in all these cases is the emphasis on world class standard Recreation and Leisure facilities. While facilities have been created for visitors, they are also used by the residents. – Gambling is a major attraction in Macau, Monaco and Sun City. – Horse racing is big in Hongkong and Dubai. – Sporting events attract people to Singapore, Hongkong, Dubai, Monaco and Sun City. – Entertainment Events are held in Sun City, Dubai, Hongkong, Singapore, Bahamas, Bermuda, Seychelles etc We believe that Chandigarh does have the potential to become a successful city state based on its own draw. It is interesting to note that city States like Dubai, Singapore, Bahamas, Bermuda, Mauritius etc do not rely on their immediate neighbours. Market segments for Chandigarh Tourism Market Segment Potential demand Potential Solutions Residents of Chandigarh Recreation and Leisure appear to be the main 1. Multiplex cinema halls demands. However, Chandigarh residents tend to 2. Amusement Park finish their working days relatively early and night 3. Night food bazaar cum entertainment entertainment demand is limited. 4. Horse Racing Neighbouring States Delhi 1. Transit traffic, specially families with small 1. Delhi - Transit Stopover traffic to Shimla or children on their way to Kulu/ Manali. These start 2. Haryana Kulu/ Manali later in the day from Delhi and the children get 3. Punjab - Short breaks restless after 4 to 5 hours. A good reason to stop 4. Himachal Pradesh Haryana would be an Amusement park. - Recreation & Leisure 2. Recreation & leisure. See comments above. None - Shopping of the contiguous states has developed good R&L - Business facilities except possibly the Gurgaon and - Meetings & Conferences Faridabad districts bordering Delhi. Punjab 3. Shopping. While Jalandhar and Ludhiana have now - Recreation & Leisure got good shopping facilities, they are still behind - Shopping the range offered by Sector 17. If this is combined - Business with R&L, it makes a powerful attraction. - Meetings & conferences 4. Business. This is normally connected with Himachal Pradesh Government. - Recreation & Leisure 5. Meetings and conferences. Chandigarh being the - Shopping State Capital of Haryana and the Punjab as well as - Medical the Northern Region HQ for several trade bodies, can satisfy this need 6. Medical. Medical facilities at the PGI are excellent. The new Fortis Hospital in Mohalli can also contribute to Chandigarh room occupancies Market Segment Potential demand Potential Solutions The Rest of India Apart from transit to HP, and a very small market No strong offer to attract this segment interested in architecture, the tourism demands from the rest of India are not met by Chandigarh NRIs – Also those of Chandigarh is the Gateway to the Punjab NRI’s could be encouraged to expose their children, many Punjab origin NRI Marriages of whom are negative to India, to the modern city beautiful - Chandigarh Other Foreign No real demand State Tourism Policy > Improving the Developing vs. National Tourism quality of places of Policy tourism tourist vvvv products interest Place Tourism on the Concurrent list Effective linkages and close coordination between Departments Safety & Security of Accreditisation Tourists of Shops, transporters Tourism Accounting System Computerisation Concentrate on one major project as State USP World Heritage sites as opportunity to expand cultural Tourism Themed Cultural Sound & Light Attractions at Rock Garden Providing necessary facilities for tourists Effective signages Have police posts at Tourism Information centres Provide a central reservation facility. Provide linkage between Rock Garden and Sukhna Lake and planned amusement park Other Chandigarh has already declared Tourism as an industry in 1994. However, incentives and concessions need to be reviewed Constitute a State Tourism Board/ Tourism Advisory Council Initiate a system for tracking tourism spends Secretariat & High Court complex?? Develop a documentary on the planning and development of Chandigarh State Tourism Policy Improving the Developing Providing Other > quality of places of necessary vs. National Tourism tourism tourist facilities for Policy products interest tourists vvvv Capitalise on Run regular Food traditional cuisines Festivals featuring foods from other States. Actively promote village tourism Exploit the potential of Sukhna Bird Create wildlife sanctuaries sanctuary awareness of the fauna Develop Adventure Improve the Development tourism with safety tourist amenities of the Sports standards at Sukhna lake. center at Kishangarh Recreation & leisure Develop a Dinner Develop an Multiplex Explore the are a vital component cruise on Sukhna amusement possibility of a of the local & regional Lake park. Race Track. This domestic tourism will help week market end occupancies in the hotels MICE to be developed Develop a for tourism, trade and convention commerce centre Develop Eco-tourism Create Develop the through grassroots, environmental Botanical community based consciousness garden movement through gardens Capitalise on the growing awareness of India’s holistic healing traditions Development of Incorporate shopping centers for traditional arts traditional crafts and and crafts with information on them Kalagram State Tourism Policy Improving the Developing Providing Other > quality of places of necessary vs. National Tourism tourism tourist facilities for Policy products interest tourists vvvv Promote the events, The quality of the A daily night fairs and festivals both Saturday Sector market can be locally and in the main 17 entertainment developed markets needs to be reviewed Provide the Convention infrastructure for center Business travel The following projects have been shortlisted Basic Tourism Infrastructure Projects 1. Setting up a system of coordination between Departments through a “Mission Approach” 2. Assessing the economic impact of tourism in Chandigarh through annual surveys and the use of multipliers 3. Setting up police outposts in the new concept “Cultural/ Tourism Centre” 4. Setting up a system for accreditisation of shops and transportation 5. Creating Tourist/ Cultural center Visitor generating projects 6. Promoting traditional cuisine 7. Horse Race track 8. Amusement Park 9. Linking the sightseeing 10. Conference center to attract business travelers 11. Developing the City Centre 12. Adventure tourism & Wildlife Tourism 13. Attracting the Private Sector Project 1 Effective linkages and close coordination between Departments There is a need to set up a system in Chandigarh to coordinate with other departments whose work has a bearing on Tourism. 1) Currently the following Government agencies have a direct impact on tourism products a) CITCO. Here, both Industrial development and Tourism come under the same department. b) Town Planning c) PWD (B&R) d) PHD for water, sewage & sanitation e) Police 2) Private bodies that are directly involved in tourism are the local chapters of a) FHRAI/ HAI b) TAAI/ IATO c) Transporters association 3) Indirect involvement by private sector corporations for business travel requirements and their related associations i) FICCI/ ASSOCHAM/ PHDCC etc. ii) Informed and committed individuals with current or potential interest in the State 4) Some Central Government agencies are also involved. These are a) NHAI b) Indian railways Two related approaches have been used by other Indian States Rajasthan has used a ‘mission’ approach whereby they have set up the Rajiv Gandhi Tourism Mission. This has the commitment from all State Ministries of giving tourism priority treatment. Uttaranchal is the first State to constitute a ‘Tourism Advisory Board’ with participation of both the Government and private sector The roles in planning and identification of projects, problems and solutions are similar. They vary in that the ‘Tourism Advisory Board’ is a body constituted under an Act with broad powers. The ‘Mission Approach’ is not a legal body and is probably easier to implement in states where tourism is not a major industry. Rajasthan - The Mission Approach This is exemplified by Rajasthan’s Rajiv Gandhi Mission on Tourism Development. While not a legal entity, the mission has A nodal agency in the Dept of Tourism, Art and Culture Collaborating agencies o RTDC o Dept of Urban Development o Dept of Archaeology & Museums o PWD o General Administration & Civil Aviation o Forest & Environment o Industries Dept o Devasthan Dept o West Zone Cultural Centre o Khadi & Village Industry Board o Archaeological Survey of India The Mission is structured with a Chairman – Chief Minister Empowered committee chaired by the Chief Secretary Mission Director – Secretary Tourism, Art & Culture District level Sub-Mission – Chairman is District Collector Site/ Local – mini mission A Mission Statement has been defined. Ten Mission objectives have been identifies and a 12 point strategy developed to implement the objectives. The mission statement seeks “To make Tourism the peoples industry”. The objectives and strategy were developed with the help of task forces that surfaced problems and solutions on a variety of subjects including Policy needs. 10 Milestones have been defined and for each milestone specific activity and deadlines detailed. The mission Director coordinates with other departments as well as professionals. The Directorate has the following Advisors Advisor Heritage Advisor Handicrafts Advisor Economist Advisor Media & Marketing Advisor Human Resource Development Advisor Research & Development Advisor Ecology/ Sociology As well as consultants from the private sector 1. Uttaranchal - Constitution of a Tourism Development Board A high level Tourism Development Board has replaced the Tourism Directorate. The responsibilities of this board are a. Formulation and Strategy for development of tourism in Uttranchal b. Preparation of plans and guidelines for developing and strengthening tourism related infrastructure in the state. c. Preparation of plans for various tourist segments and activities, identification and development of projects and ensuring their timely implementation. d. Establishment of standard / norms and framing of policy guidelines for various tourism activities. e. Formulation of a strategy for mobilizing private sector participation and investment in the tourism sector. f. A single window solution to all tourism related information, sanction for projects, escort services for obtaining clearances and approvals from other departments. 2. Identifying Key Projects - Based on the present tourist interest and the future potential in each destination. 3. Outsourcing Expertise - The tourism board empanelled more than hundred experts/ agencies to seek services of specialists and consultancy agencies. 4. Destination Management - The existing tourism centers need destination management plans to maintain and improve their effectiveness. Plans to be made for better connectivity, city decongestion, improvements of accommodation etc. 5. New Destinations - New tourism destinations have been identified which will developed and marketed as spokes to hubs to help in decongesting the hubs. 6. Private Sector Participation - The areas of accommodation facilities, tourist resorts, specialized food restaurants, facilities for adventure sports, amusement parks etc. Special incentives and concessions have been planned. 7. Human Resource Development - Plans to upgrade existing institutes and set up new institutes for diploma and degree training programmes. a) Specialist training for activities like adventure sports etc. b) Self-employment opportunities for local residents to encourage maximum participation of the host community. 8. Infrastructure Development Establishment of world class infrastructure facilities will be the highest priority of Uttranchal government. In order to do this, special efforts are being made to mobilize institutional resources and private sector investment and participation. Recommendation We recommend that Chandigarh start with a mission approach. This would require the backing of the Governor and the Chief Secretary to make it successful. The mission approach provides the coordination required and gives tourism a better profile with other departments. Project 2 Tourism Accounting System Tourism will not get the attention it deserves unless the positive impacts can be demonstrated. Several measures of the changes in economic activity can be generated. The most common are Changes in Sales or spending - The spending of visitors within the local area becomes sales or receipts for local businesses Changes in regional incomes - This is the sum of wages & salaries accruing to workers in these businesses and owners income and profits Changes in employment - Number of jobs supported by the given level of Sales. What is required to be measured for an impact analysis is the changes that occur with the introduction or closing down of facilities. In simple terms, the economic impact is Economic impact= change in # of visitors * average spend/visitor* Multiplier A visitor is defined by someone who lives outside the region so only ‘new’ spendings are measured. The overall impact is normally arrived at by c) Measuring distinct visitor segments eg. Day trips, transit, stayover, business travel, Government expenditure on tourism related activities including museums, cultural activities, recreational parks etc. d) Measuring spending in distinct categories – lodging, restaurants, meals, petrol etc. e) Allocating spending to receiving sectors and applying ratios and multipliers The first two measure primary effects. Secondary effects are of two types a) Indirect effects are changes in spending, income and jobs within the region in sectors that supply goods and services to the tourism sector. This requires an input-output matrix. b) Induced effects are the increased spends by residents from the incomes earned in tourism and the supporting sectors. Multipliers are required to capture the secondary effects and are generally sxpressed as a ratio to direct effects. These can be sales, income and employment multipliers. The World Bank has estimated that for every Rs 10 lakhs invested in India, the following number of direct jobs are created In Tourism projects 47.5 jobs In Hotels and restaurants 89.0 jobs In agriculture 44.7 jobs In Manufacturing 12.7 jobs Tata Consultancy Service has also estimated that for every direct job created in tourism, 4.62 indirect jobs are created in ancillary areas. The World Travel & Tourism Council uses a ‘Direct Revenue Multiplier’ in tourism of 2.07. While the intention of the Ministry of Tourism is to get a better understanding of the positive effects of tourism, at this stage the mechanism is not in place to collect the details in all sectors. Recommendation We suggest that Chandigarh Tourism puts in place a mechanism to collect data on direct effects. This may initially be in the form of annual surveys extrapolated to cover the State and calculated using the multipliers above. This will give Chandigarh Tourism the hard data required to substantiate the benefits of Tourism. Project 3 SAFETY & SECURITY SPECIAL TOURISM POLICE The National Tourism policy states that “There is a need for the creation of a special tourism police force for deployment at major tourist destinations. This will provide travelers security through a spirit of courtesy and hospitality.” While the creation of a special force at State level may not be feasible, the spirit of providing a sense of security to travelers is an important aspect. At the very least, all Tourist information centers – see note on the concept – should have a police outpost which can deal with crimes against tourists. The awareness of these police outposts should be widely created with hotels, restaurants and shopping centers in the relevant districts. There is no cost involved in this activity PROJECT 4. ACCREDITISATION OF SHOPS AND TRANSPORT AGENCIES Two other areas where most tourists feel insecure in the sense of being cheated are Tourist shops and transportation. It is suggested that Chandigarh Tourism institute a system of accrediting these establishments. For shops, the requirements are simple All items will be price tagged All sales will be subject to return in undamaged condition Shops will carry the accreditisation plaque/ sticker with the number of the monitoring agency For transport, again requirements can be kept simple Taxis/ rickshaws will be metered or carry a tariff sheet No fare will be refused if the taxi/ rickshaw is at a stand Participating transport will carry a plaque/ sticker with the number of the monitoring agency Participating transport drivers may be asked to wear a uniform In both cases, complaints will be taken up with the offending shop/ vehicle owner. A repeat complaint will bar the shop/ vehicle from carrying the plaque/ sticker. Recommendation We recommend that Chandigarh Tourism issue a tourist-cum-shopping guide – preferably in the form of a Chandigarh map - listing accredited shops and transporters. Maps should be given free at hotels, Sukhna Lake, Rock Garden and Sector 17 market. The cost of the guide can be recovered by advertising and sale of guides. PROJECT 6 PROMOTING TRADITIONAL CUISINES Indian cuisine is not just a trend internationally – no longer represented by just Tandoori Chicken – but within the country there is a growing interest in regional cuisine. Kerala vegetarian and non-vegetarian restaurants are thriving. Gujarati, Konkan, Chettinad and Punjabi outlets are being well patronized in the metros. In the past, extremely successful food festivals have been held at Kala Gram. Kalagram is an ideal venue between Chandigarh and Panchkula. It is suggested that State Tourism departments be contacted to conduct food festivals on an ongoing basis. Some arrangement will need to be worked out with the North Region Cultural Centre, but as this is a win-win situation for both parties – and the general public, this should be possible. Kalagram may require additional parking facilities. The neighbouring States of Himachal, Punjab, Uttar Pradesh, Uttaranchal, Haryana, Rajasthan, Jammu & Kashmir and Delhi can all be approached to hold festivals in Chandigarh. Chandigarh Tourism is also looking at promoting outbound traffic to adjoining States, and they may wish to use this platform more often. If the months of May to July are excluded, it should be possible to organize a festival every month, thereby giving Chandigarh residents and visitors an additional area of recreation and leisure. The festivals should be accompanied with performing arts and display the State handicrafts. Recommendation We recommend food festivals of various states be held at Kala Gram on an ongoing basis. This activity does not require much additional infrastructure and is in fact a revenue generating activity. Visitor numbers Past food festivals at Kalagram have generated 4-5000 visitors per festival over a 3-4 day festival period. If festivals are held monthly at a fixed period, say second weekend of the month or the full moon nights, the numbers can be sustained. 9 festivals x 5,000 visitors per festival = 45,000 visitors Revenues Revenues to Chandigarh Tourism/ Kalagram will be generated by entrance tickets and stall rentals. Stall owners – handicrafts/ F&B – will have direct sales revenues. Assume expenditure @ Rs 50 per visitor for handicrafts/ F&B/ parking 9 Food & Cultural Festivals/ annum Entrance fees = Rs 10 x 45,000 Stall rentals @ Rs5000 x 9 festival x 15 stalls Revenues to stall owners 45,000 x Rs 50 Costs = Rs 4.5 lakhs = Rs 6.75 lakhs = Rs 22.5 lakhs Venue costs are minimal as infrastructure exists. There will be promotional costs Project 12 Wildlife Tourism The Government of India, Department of Tourism has identified the development of wildlife sanctuaries as a priority item. Specific suggestions are to improve the quality of tourist facilities including Visitor information/ interpretation centers. Chandigarh has the Sukhna Bird sanctuary. As a reserved forest, people are not allowed without permission. This area should not be developed further. However, Chandigarh also has a wealth of flora. While the gardens attempt to highlight this, it is not generally known that there are over 1000 variety of trees in Chandigarh. Recommendation We do not recommend any additional expenditure other than that normally budgeted for this activity. Project 12 A Adventure Tourism Chandigarh has limited scope for adventure tourism. Apart from promoting serious boating – rowing, sculls, sailing, regattas - in Sukhna Lake, the area is not conducive to pursuing adventure tourism. Recommendation We do not recommend any additional expenditure on this activity other than that normally budgeted. Upgrading the facilities for the above can be taken up by the private sector. Project 5 Concept for Cultural / Tourism Information Centres These should be part of the City ‘Recreation and Leisure’ complex, and are envisioned as centers to showcase the State – a cross between Dilli Haat and National Crafts Museum. At the very least they should have 1. Tourist office with all information on the State 2. Central reservation capabilities for hotel and tour packages. a. These can be manned/ funded by the State Hotel Association & State Travel agent associations b. Space can also be rented to airlines, railways and travel trade associations. 3. A permanent live exhibition of the State’s traditional lifestyle, arts and crafts. This can be modeled on the National Crafts Museum. a. Artisans sell their goods directly and/ or through a central shop. The center provides a platform for the artisan on a revenue share or straight lease. b. State produce can also be sold e.g Basmati rice 4. A permanent restaurant featuring the State cuisine. a. This should be leased with stipulations on the menu and service standards b. The area can also carry periodic photo exhibits/ art exhibits. 5. Some permanent shops can be incorporated and leased out. a. Factory outlets of manufacturers based in the State is one example. 6. An open air amphitheatre to showcase the State’s performing arts a. This should also have screening facilities for documentaries b. This can be leased for private functions including marriages, film shooting 7. Open spaces for putting up stalls for celebrating State festivals a. These can be handicrafts and food stalls leased to private parties. 8. Space should also be allotted to other State Tourism bodies 9. A police outpost where problems faced by tourists can be addressed. Estimated costs for construction of this cultural centers are Activity Budget Tourist office building with space for State tourist offices, Central 50 lakhs reservations office, restaurant and police outpost, other offices Live exhibition of State’s arts and crafts, permanent shops 10-15 lakhs Open air amphitheatre – 750-100 persons 10 lakhs Space for temporary stalls for State festivals 2 lakhs Recommendation This should be set up in the amusement park area planned near Sukhna lake. Visitor numbers The objective of this facility is to provide service, not generate additional visitors, though there will be an indirect effect. Revenues Office rentals 10 offices x Rs10,000/ month Restaurant rental @ Rs 20,000/ month Shop rentals 10 shops x Rs 20,000/ month Amphitheatre rentals 20 functions @ Rs 20,000 Costs = Rs 12.0 lakhs = Rs 2.4 lakhs = Rs 24.0 lakhs = Rs 4.0 lakhs Ongoing costs are for maintenance and common utilities @ Rs 24 lakhs/ year. Funding The initial capital required is Rs 70-75 lakhs. Breakeven is achieved in 4-5 years and thereafter, it is a profitable operation. Attracting the Private Sector While there appears to be no requirement to incentivise the building of hotels, there are other tourism related activities that would need incentives to attract the private sector. We recommend that Chandigarh Government consider the following to develop a package of incentives.. INCENTIVES FOR TRAVEL & LEISURE INDUSTRY 1. Assistance on project report preparation 2. Concessional land for specified projects 3. Entertainment tax exemption for 5 years 4. Capital investment subsidy of 20% subject to a maximum of Rs 20 lakhs 5. Recommendation of loans to Financial Institutions 6. Interest subsidy on loans from approved financial institutions 7. Energy subsidy 8. Concessions on stamp duties/ reimbursement – urban areas, rural areas 9. Concessions on Change in land use fees 10. Excise licence fees concessions 11. Concession on Transport taxes on vehicles used for this activity. INVOLVING THE NON TRAVEL & LEISURE SECTOR IN TOURISM ACTIVITIES Chandigarh has over 25 corporates and PSUs with turnovers of over Rs 100 crores. These all have some commitment to Chandigarh and can be approached for sponsoring various activities that can improve the tourist experience. Greening of the environment – road dividers, green belts, parks Cleaning of the environment – garbage bins and collection Sponsorships of o signage o projects such as handicraft villages o events such as local festivals o information kiosks o tourist literature The companies may be compensated in terms of exposure available. It is also common to have directional signs to the company premises. Project 7 Horse Race Course Horse racing is an activity that draws week end traffic. In India, the main race tracks are in Mumbai and Kolkata. These depend largely on the local population with free income. However, Pune and Bangalore both have successful race tracks where the attendance is from outside the city. The race season in these two cities fills hotels over the normally low weekends. Revenue sources for Race Clubs are Club memberships Sponsorship of Corporate boxes Club house activities F&B concessions/ sales Gate money from attendees. Sponsorship of races. Programme sales Programme advertising Horses pay to race/ stable Share of tote Off-season revenues are buoyed by off track betting. Race tracks around the country pay for live telecasts via satellite. o This brings in viewership of about 2 lakh people Race tracks are also labour intensive, both for the track and for anciliary activities like stud farms, training paddocks, stables and for manning the accommodations for staff, trainers jockeys etc. A quality race course with a 2000 meter track requires an area of about 200 acres depending on the shape of the plot. On clear grounds, a race track can be laid in 100 acres. The area around Chandigarh and Delhi have the best stud farms in the country. Many are owned by political figures. There are at least 10 stud farms in the North where horses are bought for racing across the country. Owners of stud farms currently need to travel to other race tracks to promote their products. The Delhi Race Course does not cater to quality horse races. Setting up a race track is complicated. Tracks like Hongkong, Singapore, Malaysia, Kentucky etc all have their own systems and one suitable for Chandigarh will need to be worked out in conjunction with stud farms, race horse owners, authorities etc. The modern tote systems are totally electronic and cost upto Rs 2 crores. They are backed by broadband access to allow off track betting and satellite broadcast/ reception. The indicated expense of setting up an entire race course with track, club house, stabling, accommodation, tote machines etc is in the region of Rs 40-50 crores minus cost of land. The facility is usually given on long lease. Note Mr. Narendra Lagad from Pune is an acknowledged authority on setting up race courses. He has set up one in Kandy, Sri Lanka. (Contacts are 020-6879495/ 6870217/ 098220-28285 e-mail : narendralagad@hotmail.com ) Recommendation Chandigarh further examine the feasibility of including a Race Course in the Master Plan. The Club can have other sports facilities to attract memberships. Accommodation for out of town visitors should also be examined. The entire project should be in th private sector. Visitor numbers Race attendees 15 race days x 5000 attendees = 75,000 30 off track x 1000 attendees = 30,000 Club Members Permanent members = 500 Out station members = 300 Revenues 1. Gate money Race days 75,000 x Rs50 = Rs 37.5 lakhs Off track 30,000 x Rs 20 = Rs 6.0 lakhs 2. Club memberships 500 members x Rs 2 lakhs = Rs 1000 lakhs 300 outstation x Rs 75,000 = Rs 225 lakhs 3. Monthly dues + usage 300 x Rs 1000 = Rs 3.0 lakhs 300 x Rs 400 = Rs 1.2 lakhs 4. Company sponsored boxes 10 x Rs 5 lakhs/ year = Rs 50 lakhs 5. F&B concessions 45 days x 5 concessions x Rs5000 = Rs 11.25 lakhs 6. Programme sales 1 programme per 4 attendees xRs 10 = Rs 2.6 lakhs 7. Programme advertising @ Rs 1 lakh a programme x 45 = Rs 45 lakhs 8. Race charges 15 races x 8 horses x Rs 5000 = Rs 6.0 lakhs 9. Share of tote 5% of 105K attendees x Rs 200 per = Rs 105 lakhs Plus royalties for live telecasts. Costs - Ongoing 1. Race purses/ prizes – At least 2 prizes per meet can be sponsored by Corporate Houses. 2. Personnel – This includes a. Tote supervisors/ tellers/ gate entrance/ horsemen’s book keeper b. Racing secretariat/ starter/ announcer/ stewards/ paddock judge. Some of these can be voluntary positions c. Club house personnel d. Track maintenance/ security 3. Equipment maintenance. This can be outsourced 4. Insurance 5. Utilities 6. Track Maintenance 7. Advertising. Programme printing Funding recommendation The requirement is Rs 40-50 crores plus cost of land. The entire project should be tendered to the Private Sector. There are a variety of ways this can be managed from JV to fixed leases to profit/ revenue sharing. Project 8 Amusement Park Attracting tourists en route to Himachal Pradesh Up to less than ten years ago, given the state of the highways and the quality of cars, most tourists driving from Delhi to the Himachal destinations of Shimla and Kullu- Manali required up to 6 hours to reach the Chandigarh environments. For many, especially those on their way to Kullu-Manali or those traveling with young children, a stop-over in Chandigarh was very convenient. Today, the distance is covered in 4 hours or less and Chandigarh is now accessed before lunch. Given that the average person can comfortably drive 400 Km or 6 hours a day, they can easily reach Shimla. Also given the fact that car ownership is increasing at over 18% a year and that domestic tourism is increasing at 5% a year, traffic to Himachal out of Delhi will only increase over the next decade. The increased tourism promotion activity of Uttaranchal will also spur the HP Government to promote tourism more actively. Therefore, it is imperative that some portion of the transit traffic to Kullu-Manali is attracted to overnight in Chandigarh. The logical segment to attract is those traveling with children as children tire of long car trips. In short, the attraction should be oriented to children. Therefore, we propose an amusement cum water park. The water park would be a major attraction as most movement to the hills is in the Summer months. This need not be on the scale of a Disney World, but the rides and facilities of Appu Ghar but with quality equipment would suffice. This would also be a facility for the local population of Chandigarh, providing reasonably priced family entertainment, currently available in very limited scope. The ideal location for this facility would be in the Kishangarh area, adjacent to the current leisure areas of Sukhna Lake, the Golf course and the Rock Garden. This has already been identified by Chandigarh Town Planning. The park should be marketed to the specific segment of families with small children traveling to Kulu/ Manali. Possible facilities in an amusement park are listed below. While weekend usage will be high, it is necessary to balance the products to drive traffic throughout the week and throughout the day. The analysis below attempts this. Weekday usage Invest Direct Indirect Attraction AM PM Night ment jobs jobs Amusement Park - Ferris Wheel, slides, rides, dodgem cars Med Hi Hi Animal rides Med Hi Lo Bowling Med Hi Hi Casino/ Slot Machines Lo Med Hi Cultural Centre - Dilli Haat style to showcase the State Hi Hi Hi Fairground stalls - games of chance and skill Med Med Hi Food Court - Vishala/ Chowkidana Lo Lo Hi Go-karting Lo Lo Hi Kiddies play centre - Primeplay, Softlands Hi Hi Med Mini-golf - Putt Putt Med Med Hi Science Centre- Eg. Panorama in Kurukshetra Hi Hi Lo Shopping mall - designer shops a la Santushti, factory outlets, discount clubs Hi Hi Med Roller Skating rink Lo Med Hi Swimming Pool - heated(?) Hi Hi Hi Water Park Lo Med Hi Mini - Zoo Hi Hi Med Name of Park Area in Annual Entrance fees excluding video acres Visitors games and some selected rides. lakhs Child below 1 metre free. Essel World, Gorai 64 18–20 Child Rs.200/ Adult Rs 250 Water Kingdom, Gorai 24 12-14 Child Rs225/ Adult Rs 275 Nicco Park, Kolkata 40 12-13 Kishi Kintha, Chennai 10 VGP Universal, M’puram 8 Appu Garh, Delhi 6-7 MGM, Chennai 5-6 Fun city, Chandigarh 4 Child Rs140/ Adult Rs 140 Fun & Food Village, Delhi 12 5 Nicco Bhubhaneswar 15 2-2.5 Nicco Jamshedpur 8 2-2.5 Great Escapes, Nagpur 2 Visitor numbers Given that Fun City, with its less than prime location, attracts around 5 lakh visitors a year, and that the recommended location can easily attract highway traffic to Himachal, it is not unreasonable to base visitor numbers at 5 lakhs a year going up to 7 over 3-4 years. Visitor spends Factoring in student discounts and free children, Essel World/ Water Kingdom average Rs 175 per visitor. In Chandigarh, the average will probably be around Rs 150. In addition, visitors spend on parking, F&B and souvenirs as also on specialized rides and video games. An average visitor spend on items other than entrance is taken at Rs 50 per visitor. Therefore revenues can be assumed to be 5 lakhs x Rs 150 = Rs 7.5 crores on entrance fees and a further 5 lakhs x Rs 50 = Rs 2.5 crores on other items. Total revenues Rs 10 crores Costs It costs roughly Rs 1.0 crore an acre to create an amusement park. The investment in Chandigarh will be in the region of Rs 15 crores. Funding It is recommended that Chandigarh Tourism tenders the entire project to private sector. There a variety of ways this can be done from JV to various types of leases. Marketing This will be done by the amusement park operator. Project 9 Linking the sightseeing Chandigarh Tourism has recently introduced the Hop-on Hop-off bus linking the sightseeing of Chandigarh in an extremely user-friendly manner. This works very well for attractions that are fairly wide spread from each other where customers are willing to wait the 15 minutes to half an hour for the next lift. However, when attractions are relatively close together, waiting for the bus versus walking to the next attraction becomes a dilemma and an irritant. The main case in point is the 1 km distance between the Rock Garden and Sukhna Lake, both ‘must see’ attractions of Chandigarh. The walk versus the wait for the bus, specially with children, are both unattractive options! The other alternative option is to pay a hefty fare to the auto rickshaws It is understood that Chandigarh Town Planning has proposed leisure activities in the area beyond the Lake and between the existing Golf Course and Kishangarh. These are A sports complex Health resort/ picnic huts Amusement park This, along with the activities already existing in the Sukhna Lake area, make this area a hub of leisure activities, visited by all Chandigarh tourists and most Chandigarh residents. There are several possible solutions to ease this situation for the Chandigarh tourist. Regulate the auto rickshaws to charge the official fares o Auto rickshaws will probably boycott the stand as the potential fare is the minimum drop of flag amount. o It is probably not economically viable to increase the number of buses that would be required to increase frequency over the entire circuit. Introduce a shuttle bus between the two places o This would require one more bus to shuttle every 10 minutes o Customers may not be willing to pay any amount over and above the basic Hop-on Hop-off fare for a bus service that is seen to be part of the same system. Introduce a novel form of cheap transport between the two locations. Some alternatives o Animal drawn buggies o An elevated monorail/ rail system It has been indicated that a 2 Km elevated track would be extremely costly. The monorail is necessarily electric o A conventional rail track with ‘antique’ engines and coaches in miniature. This would be like the narrow gauge railway to Matheran/ Darjeeling. The engine would be a diesel/ electric engine and could be designed like the ‘Fairy Queen’. This would be an attraction in it’s own right. A diesel/ electric train can be run very cost-efficiently. Pollution versus a steam train is minimal Recommendation It is recommended that a narrow gauge track and rake be commissioned to the private sector. Revenues From ticket sales The Rock Garden receives an average of 3,000 – 5,000 visitors a day. All visitors to the Rock Garden also go to Sukhna Lake. With the development of the Recreational Area, the Sports complex, the Tourist & Healht Resort and the Amusement park, the number of visitors can only increase. If 35 -40% of the visitors use the transport, which is an attraction in itself, this is roughly 1500 passengers a day @ Rs 5/ passenger = Rs 2.25 lakhs/ month. If running/ maintenance costs are 50%, net profits are Rs 1 lakh a month for a 70 month breakeven. If the Amusement Park and Tourist Health and Sports Centre are developed in Kishangarh, the numbers will rise dramatically. In addition, there will be opportunity of generating revenues from advertising on the train. Costs The estimated cost for setting down 2 Km of track is Rs 20 lakhs and the cost of the train, 4 coaches with 50 passenger capacity is Rs 20 lakhs. The engine is Rs 30 lakhs for a total project cost of Rs 70 lakhs Sources of funds It is recommended that this project be funded by Chandigarh Tourism. The Indian railways may be approached to set up a mini rail museum in this area. Marketing There is no marketing and promotion necessary and hence no specific marketing costs. Project 10 Conference Centre for Business Travel Businessmen travel to Meet buyers Meet suppliers Visit Home/ branch offices Incentive travel – where the travel is an incentive reward for better performance Attend conferences – own company and business associations The first three reasons for travel cannot be influenced by third parties. Business travel however can be generated to particular destinations through incentive travel and through conferences, conventions and exhibitions. Apart from road, rail and air access which is a common essential to develop these activities, and which is adequate in Chandigarh, each of the above also has its own requirements. Incentive Travel Incentive destinations are typically not those with cultural attractions but those with a wide range of leisure activities and nightlife. The participants of an incentive group are all prize winners of performance awards and are looking for a fun time in a place that ordinarily would be out of reach of their pockets or regular family holiday destinations. Chandigarh is not suited for incentive travel. Meetings, Conventions and Exhibitions Meetings and conferences These are traditionally organized by companies for their own staff, distribution chain and, occasionally, suppliers. They are company need-based to communicate messages that require some interaction to a medium sized audience. The size of the company in terms of number of people and the spread of distribution are the prime drivers of meetings and conferences. Apart from companies headquartered in Chandigarh, those headquartered in the surrounding districts of the Punjab and Haryana are also candidates for holding meetings and conferences in Chandigarh. A listing of such companies is attached. Conventions and Seminars These are meetings held for multiple organizations interested in the same topic. They are usually organized by industry associations, professional associations, management associations, universities and NGOs to discuss topics of common interest. Among the more common conventions are various medical disciplines, religious, environmental subjects etc. However, the local chapter of the association needs to drive the organization of conventions and seminars. Typically, a bid document is put up to the national body that then may make an inspection trip to view facilities. The bid is normally submitted with comprehensive back-up documentation which apart from the core expertise is exhibited, the documentation covers extra-curricular activities during the day for spouses and evening and night entertainment, accommodation facilities, transportation etc. The local chapter must also organize the convention/ seminar. This can be fairly complicated and many organizations do not have in-house expertise. Successful conventions require that organizers are educated in meetings management. Cities that have evolved as convention destinations generally have a dedicated ‘Convention Visitors Bureau’ that works with local organizations to generate conventions. The Bureau has full time employees and a committee made up of representatives from the local tourism, hospitality, transport facilities as well as Associations. The attachment gives some organizations that can generate conventions in Chandigarh. Exhibitions Exhibitions are held to display products. These may be organized by Companies – A launch of new products is usually accompanied by an exhibition Associations – Manufacturing associations, agricultural associations and other industry associations including travel, automobile, job fairs all require exhibition area. Exhibition halls, typically being unfurnished have multi usage potential such as marriages, concerts and other social events. It appears that there is scope for a meetings facility in Chandigarh. Given that hotel capacities, both current and in the future, will be contained by town planning, the conference facility should not be too large. Chandigarh Town Planning has already identified a 7 acre plot in Sector 31, next to the CII Northern region Headquarters. Recommendation It is suggested that this offers A venue for General Body meetings of 600-800 persons (Approx 600-800 sq.mtr). This would be auditorium seating 3-4 break-out rooms. These are not with any fixed seating but should have capacities ranging from 50 to 150 persons theatre style.( Approx 400 sq.mts) Exhibition area of approximately 1500 sq.mtr Business center facilities Restaurant and snack Bar Parking Visitor numbers Typically, utilization of convention and exhibition area space is taken at 25% of capacity, even though it is possible to use spaces more than once a day. Exhibition area space may be better utilised as it has multi-functionality for social occasions. A 600 seat auditorium with break out rooms should see a throughput of roughly 55,000 persons a year. The exhibition space will have utilization for both exhibits and social functions. These are mutually exclusive. If the space is used 25% for exhibitions - 90 days a year including set up and knock down times – in other words exhibits available for 60-65 days, throughput of visitors will be 60-65,000. Of the 270 days available for social functions, we can take a utilization of 40% or 100 days with an average marriage attendance of 500 pax, this will be 50,000 pax. Visitor revenues Revenues from conference hall Rentals per event @ Rs 20,000/event x 90 days = Rs 18 lakhs F&B on attendance of 55,000 x Rs 200 = Rs 110 lakhs Revenues from exhibition hall Rentals per event @ Rs 20,000 x 90 days = Rs 18 lakhs F& B on attendance of 60,000 x Rs 25 = Rs 15 lakhs Revenues on Social functions Attendance 50,000 x Rs 200 = Rs 100 lakhs Total = Rs 261 lakhs Cost The total cost of construction of approximately 3000 sq.mtrs convention center will be in the region of Rs 8-10 crores. Landscaping 7 acres with parking will be around Rs 15 Lakhs. Profitability of rental income is around 80% - Rs 29 lakhs - and F&B income around 50% - Rs 112 lakhs for a total profitability of Rs 140 lakhs approx. Project viability break even in 5 –7 years. Funding Sources Part of the cost of construction can be de-frayed by Corporates paying to have some of the break-out rooms and possibly the main auditorium named after their company/ founder. ASSOCHAM has done this successfully with their HQ in Delhi. Marketing A convention promotion bureau should be set up. Potential clients for conferences and conventions both in India and abroad are easily identified from ICCA and other association lists. The convention bureau will need to work with their India Chapters to prepare attractive bid documents. Project 11 Energising the City Centre Sector 17 is the City Centre of Chandigarh. While most sectors have their own markets for daily essentials, Sector 17 is where aspirational ‘Lifestyle’ products are retailed. The market has been designed with vast pedestrian spaces and is eminently suitable to be developed as a social and entertainment hub. Apart from the months of May & June, Chandigarh weather is suitable for outdoor activities Evenings - Mid March to end April, July to November During the Day - December to mid March A social and entertainment hub would require Shopping for aspirational items. This trend already exists in Sector 17. Opening hours should allow for late shopping. Night market stalls of handicraft items should be allowed Special Sales periods/ Shopping Carnivals should be announced in advance Range of F&B outlets. There is a reasonable range of outlets. These should be encouraged. Liquor licences should be made more easily available and extension of service should be allowed till 1am. Entertainment Movie Halls/ multiplexes/ open air movies and documentaries Video parlours/ Bowling alleys/ slot machines Street entertainment. Local performing artists and those performing at Kalagram, All the Chandigarh festivals could be moved to Sector 17 – April Fools Day, Mango Festival, Indo-Pak Mushaira, Chrysanthamum Show Administration Energising the City Centre would require the active involvement of the Sector 17 shop keepers who have the most to gain from this initiative. They should be brought into the very initial planning stages. These activities do not require large funding, but coordination is crucial for success. Committees comprised of shop keepers and Chandigarh Administration should be formed for various types of activities. Funding As noted, large funds are not required. It should be possible to levy a small cess on shop turnover to fund activities. Marketing This is aimed to provide a focal point for Chandigarh residents. Communicating events will not require more than posters in Sector 17 and other sector markets. Attracting Private Sector Investment In Tourism Sector 1. Taxes 1.1 Rationalisation of taxes Expenditure tax is imposed by National Government while Luxury tax by State Governments. With the Expenditure tax, which is being levied at 10% where room charges are Rs. 3000 or more, being discontinued from 1 June 2003 as per the Union Budget 2003 and no Luxury tax levied, Chandigarh has an advantage over its neighbouring States. Incase in future Expenditure tax or any other tax is levied, then it is preferable to review the effect of total tax while calculating the taxes to be levied on the hotel industry. Moreover these taxes may be charged on the actual room tariff rather on published tariff rate card. 1.2 Other taxes In addition Service tax by Center and Entertainment tax by UT are also being imposed on the hotels. In the Union Budget 2003 services provided by the Hotels are exempted from Service tax. The rates of these taxes, together with expenditure tax and luxury tax, may be decided considering the composite tax (indirect taxes) rate for the hotel industry. The composite tax on hotel industry in India vis-à-vis neighbouring countries is presented in the table below: Composite Tax on Country Hotel Industry (%) India 30* Indonesia 21 Thailand 17 Malaysia 15 Singapore 14 Source: PHDCCI * Estimation includes 10% expenditure tax. 1.3 Sales Tax The Sales tax on beverages and liquor is 12% in the UT, which is moderately higher, compared to other states like Uttar Pradesh, Himachal Pradesh, Punjab, Delhi, etc. Keeping in view the tax structure of other States and especially neighbouring States, Chandigarh may reconsider the sales tax rates for these. 1.4 Transport tax Chandiragh has no transport tax while its neighbouring states Punjab and Haryana are charging the same. A single point tax collection system may be implemented in order to simplify the procedure and ensure smooth movement of tourist inter-states. Further, the tax rate per quarter levied on air-conditioned and non air-conditioned tourist vehicles may be limited by an overall cap amount for the country. 1.5 Power The cost of electricity is a major component in the overall cost structure for a hotel and hence may need to be maintained in line with other comparative States. 1.6 Foreign exchange earnings The UT may consider requesting the Centre for the extension of the time frame of income tax exemption on export earning under section 80HHD of the Income Tax Act 1961. The tourism sector may be granted this extension as like other exporters they too export their services and earn foreign exchange for the country. However, we may mention that it is unlikely that Centre will agree to this request as it has announced phasing out of such incentives. 1.7 Income Tax The UT may also request Centre for providing investments in hotels as well as other industry in the tourism sector with Tax Holiday for a pre-determined period which can be decided in consultation with the various departments and the private sector participants. In order to promote new investments in a particular industry, request for tax holiday for about 5 years for new investments, applicable for 2 year from the current financial year, may be sought. This may likely create positive interest among private sector to invest in these industries with in 2 years to avail the tax holiday. Here too, we may like to mention that the Centre providing such benefits is very unlikely. 2. Investment 2.1 Land rates The Government may consider providing land at concessional rates for construction of hotels and other infrastructure for tourism by private investor. Alternatively, Government may provide land free of cost and acquire stake in the new project constructed on it by private sector through a join venture. The Government has draft a joint venture policy for attracting private sector, a review of which is also incorporated in this report. 2.2 Stamp duty Chandigarh may consider reducing the stamp duty levied especially in the area related to pilgrimages, rural area, etc. 2.3 One window clearance Chandigarh may provide one window clearance to the prospective private sector willing to invest in the UT. This will ensure speedy and efficient investment procedure for the private sector thereby attracting necessary investments. 3. Administrative Structure 3.1 Tourism Advisory Board The UT may strive towards constituting a board or a council comprising members from Tourism Development Corporation, Investment Promotion Board, Industrial Development Corporation, National Tourism Corporation/Department, etc. which will be primarily responsible for co-ordination and monitoring of tourism related activities and projects to ensure proper implementation of Tourism Policy. A detailed suggestion is set out in this report earlier. 3.2 Tourism Development Fund The UT may implement Targeted Funding approach by creating Tourism Development Fund (TDF) which will be recipient of all revenues generated from tourism and tourism related businesses. The Fund will be created by raising low interest loans from multilateral agencies that are actively involved in providing financial assistance to public/private sectors for infrastructure development. A Special Purpose Vehicle may be created where all the funds raised will be parked and a deployed in developing infrastructure to enhance tourism sector. The identification of infrastructure for the development can be done in consultation with other administrative bodies, which are also responsible in developing infrastructure of the state to ensure proper co-ordination between all such bodies. 4. Infrastructure The Government may try to identify areas of strategic importance and involve private sectors in non-strategic areas. Further it may try to segregate core and non-core activities involved in the areas of strategic importance e.g. maintenance of railway platform, maintenance of bus station, etc. and allow private sectors in these activities. Such activities may be provided on a license basis, lease basis, etc. as decided after a proper study of the same. The funds raised by disinvesting of these non-core activities can be utilised in developing infrastructure of the UT. 5. Promotion Chandigarh may plan for an advertising strategy, which will attract tourist from the desired regions and thus benefiting the tourism industry in the UT. This will increase the interest of the private sector in investing in the tourism sector in the UT. The advertising strategy may include amongst others: Shopping festivals, Fun and Fair festivals, Rural art and handicraft festivals, etc. Options for Attracting Private Sector Participation The projects in tourism, like infrastructure projects, too have long gestation period and requires huge capital investment initially. Further, the feasibility of tourism related projects are contingent on development and quality of infrastructure of the region like power, road, railway, water and communications. No single individual agency either the private sector or the Government could finance the sector all alone as the investment required are large and the risk too is relatively higher. Hence part of the load of development of tourism sector may be shared by the inclusion of private sector There are primarily two ways of sharing the responsibility with the private sector: Attracting Private Sector for new projects on all alone basis, Creating Public Private Partnership for new projects, Creating Public Private Partnership for existing projects owned by Government bodies, and Privatisation of existing projects to private sector. A brief note on each method of involving private sector is set out below: 1. Attracting Private Sector for new projects: The private sector may be attracted towards new projects related to tourism like Leisure centers, entertainment parks, theatres, health spa, hotels, etc. by providing incentives for such investments. The list of incentives, applicable period, industry, investment amount, etc may be decided once the type of industry in the tourism sector is identified where Government would like the private sector to accept the responsibility. 2. Creating Public Private Partnership for new projects: The strategy to encourage Public Private Partnership include creating a Tourism Development Finance Company and developing alternative options for partnerships. 2.1 Tourism Development Finance Company A TDFC may be formed with the investment from various state as well as centre owned financial institutions and inviting private sector and international agencies too may be considered. The main role of TDFC will to promote investment in tourism sector by providing long term debt and equity for the same. 2.2 Alternative Models The alternative models for Public Private Partnership for new projects is set out below: Build Operate Transfer (BOO) The private participant invest, executes the project, runs the business and transfer the property to the Government after the agreed span of period is over. Build Operate Lease Transfer (BOLT) The private sector will invest, execute the project, operate the business and then transfer the assets to the Government on completion of agreed span of time. After the hand over of the assets to the Government the private participant will get fixed income by way of lease, which is agreed during the inception. Build Own Operate and Transfer (BOOT) The private sector will invest, execute the project, own the assets created, operate the business and then transfer the assets to the Government on recovery of investments made at a designated rate of return. Until such time the hand over of the assets to the Government is completed, the private participant is responsible for maintenance and operation of the assets. 3. Creating Public Private Partnership for existing projects owned by Government bodies: The private sector may be interested in few existing projects owned by the Government, which the latter may like to share the responsibility of day-today-operation of the business but at the same time would also like to retain stake in the assets. We may like to mention that such properties may be spun-off as a separate entity and private sector may be invited to run the business in following two ways: Formation of Joint Venture by inclusion of a private strategic partner: The private participant will invest funds in the new entity (existing project spun-off) and in return the Government will provide stake in the entity. While the private participant will be primarily be responsible for operating and strategic management decisions, approval of key decisions will required an concurrence from the Government. Issuing license for management control to private parties and retaining ownership with the Government: The private participant neither provides any fund to the Government nor invests funds in the existing project. The ownership of the entity lies with the Government whereas the day-to-day operations are carried out by the private participant for a fixed fee or a revenue sharing model as agreed upon. 4. Privatisation of existing projects to private sector: The step wise strategy for privatisation of the tourism related properties is set out below: 4.1 Setting up a Commission The UT/Center may initiate the process of privatisation by setting up a Privatisation Commission (or Disinvestment Commission) for the purpose of privatisation of Government owned Tourism related properties. The commission will be primarily responsible for reviewing all properties with respect to the financial status of the properties, priority of privatisation, the strategic importance of the property, etc. 4.2 Identification of Tourism Properties Subsequently, the commission will identify the Government owned properties related to tourism to be disinvested and the approach in which the privatisation process will be adopted. The various strategies, which may be considered for the privatisation, are set out below: a. The related properties may be clubbed together and privatised, b. Create chain of hotels, chain of restaurants, chain of dhabas, etc and privatise each chain, c. Sell certain properties on stand alone basis, etc. d. Create a trail and sell the trail, etc. We may mention that the Government may appoint an advisor at this stage to assist in the process of formulation of detailed property-wise strategy, implementation of the strategy, structuring of the deals in terms of creation of Special Purpose Vehicles, spun-off of units, regulatory requirements, etc. marketing of the transactions and advise Government in the process till the transactions are completed. A detailed scope of work for the advisor may be drafted once the list of properties to be privatised in prepared. Funding Of Tourism Projects Type of Funds The funds required to be raised for projects can be categorised broadly under three heads: Equity, Quasi equity, and Loans. The mix of funding will depend upon the nature of project undertaken, the risk involved, the cash flows envisaged in future, creation of physical assets in order to leverage the project, etc. Source of Fund Most of the Financial Institutes provide all kinds of plain vanilla funds, which are set out above. In addition, they also provide funds such as syndicate loans, Interest rate hedging/swaps, currency hedging loans, etc. in order to match the requirements of the projects. An indicative list of Financials Institutions who may be approached for assistance in investments in Tourism sector are set out below: 1. Domestic Financial Institutes Tourism Finance Corporation of India Infrastructure Leasing Finance of India Industrial Development Bank of India Industrial Finance Corporation of India ICICI Limited Industrial Development Finance Corporation Limited Investment Institutes Life Insurance Corporation of India General Insurance Corporation of India United Trust of India State Financial Institutes Haryana State Industrial Development Corporation Haryana Financial Corporation 2. International Financial Institutes International Monetary Fund World Bank Asian Development Bank International Finance Corporation(only to private sector) KFW Line of Credit International Bank of Reconstruction Overseas Private Investment Corporation Application for Fund There is no standard application form for financing a project as it varies from one Financial Institution to another. A company or entrepreneur, foreign or domestic, seeking to establish a new venture can approach the FI by submitting an Investment Proposal. The proposal submitted to FI for consideration should include the preliminary information as set out in Annexure A. Terms and conditions of Funding Terms A list of terms, which are usually a part of any funding agreement, is set out below: Currencies The currency of the loan/fund to be disbursed by the Lender, payment of interest and repayment of the principal amount to the Lender is specified under this head. Lending Rate Lending rate can be broadly of three types: Floating rate: 6-month London Interbank offered rate (LIBOR) for the US dollar and Japanese Yen and 6-month euro interbank offered rate (EURIBOR) for the euro plus a lending spread. Fixed rate : The cost of Bank’s fixed rate borrowing of US dollars, Japenese yen or Swiss francs plus a lending spread. Resetter : Its is similar to fixed rate loans for the initial period which is tailored to the borrower’s need after a specified period. It is charged as a % per annum on progressive amount of undisbursed loan Commitment Fee balance. Its is a flat percentage fee of the loan amount Front-End Fee As may be determined based on project needs and could comprise of a Maturity grace period and a repayment period with final maturity. Following conversion options would be available subject to the Bank’s Loan Conversion conversion procedures as may be applicable at the time of conversion. Options Transaction Fees Disbursement schedule Prepayment Cancellation Repayment Lending Rate Reset / Payment Dates Currency Conversion: The undisbursed amounts/disbursed amounts in whole or part of the undisbursed balance/disbursed amount of the loan may be converted into the three offered currencies. Interest Rate Conversion: The floating lending rate on the whole or part of the disbursed balance may be converted into a fixed-rate at the prevailing market rate or vice versa for whole or part of the loan's residual maturity. Interest Rate Caps and Collars: A cap or collar on the floating lending rate may be purchased for up to the entire disbursed amount, for the whole or part of the residual maturity. A transaction fees may be charged pertaining to the above referred loan conversion. Amount and timing of loan disbursement are structured as per the project needs. All or part of the disbursed and outstanding loans may be prepaid. Floating rate loans could be prepaid on an interest payment due date without a prepayment premium. Prepayment of floating rate loans on a date other than the interest payment due date will attract payment of a premium based on the difference, if any, between the rate at which the proceeds from the prepayment could be reinvested and Bank’s funding cost for the prepaid amount. Prepayment of fixed rate loans or floating rate loans that involve conversion and a corresponding hedge requiring termination will attract payment of hedge unwinding costs, if any. Borrower may cancel all or a part of the undisbursed balance at any time. Equal principal or annuity repayments. Lending rate for floating rate loans are generally reset every six months on an interest payment date. Interest payment are generally due either on the 1st or 15th day of a calendar month and semiannually thereafter. Conditions The primary objective of introducing conditions while providing loan/funds is to ensure that the proceeds of the loan are used only for the purposes for which the loan was granted and with due attention to considerations of economy and efficiency. Thus, the Lender’s loan documents (e.g., loan agreement, guarantee agreement, where relevant project agreement, etc.) stipulate the loan covenants that are considered necessary to ensure the efficient implementation of, and the full realisation of benefits from, projects financed by Lender. The loan covenants can be divided broadly into two categories: general covenants and special covenants: (i) General Covenants General covenants are standard assurances and undertakings that the Lender requires from all borrowers, guarantors, if any, and executing agencies for projects financed by the loans regardless of the special features of a particular project. General covenants include obligations on the part of the borrower, guarantor, if any, and the executing agency: to carry out the project with diligence and efficiency; to repay the loan; to procure goods and services and engage consultants in accordance with specified procedures; to maintain project records and accounts; to provide local currency funds, facilities, and other resources required for carrying out the project; to submit financial statements/ progress reports; and to establish and maintain adequate auditing arrangements with the provision that the Lender will retain the option to communicate directly with the auditors. (ii) Special Covenants Special covenants are those assurances and undertakings which the Lender considers necessary or desirable to obtain from the borrower, guarantor, if any, and the executing agency for each project, having regard to the special features, identified difficulties, and reference points for monitoring of each project. Special covenants are an important part of the loan documents and are so designed that compliance with these covenants will further ensure the successful implementation of the project, sustainable operation of the facilities, and full realization of its benefits. They also provide a basis for the Lender to monitor project implementation and performance. To facilitate monitoring of compliance, special covenants should indicate, wherever possible, the dates by which compliance is expected of various items therein, on the basis of a realistic assessment of project-specific requirements and the related government policy and procedure. Where special circumstances so warrant, special covenants may be used to require the borrower, if any, or the executing agency/guarantor to undertake necessary action even after completion of project implementation so as to ensure sustainability of project benefits. Compatibility of Loan Covenants with Local Laws Covenants are generally compatible with local laws, administrative practices and procedures, sectoral/subsectoral requirements, and socioeconomic conditions of developing member countries. Interventions required Sr Suggestions Agencies Involved 1 Taxation Rationalisation, reduction and SEB, Finance Department tax holidays. and Government of India 2 Land rates Concession CITCO 3 One window Creation of a body for one stop CITCO and SEB clearance processing 4 Structure Creation of a Tourism Advisory Government of Chandigarh Body Creation of Tourism Finance Deparment and Development Fund CITCO 5 Infrastructure Development of infrastructure CITCO, PWD, Finance and involvement of private Department. sector 6 Marketing Promotion of Chandigarh CITCO Tourism 7 Attracting Private Providing incentives SEB, Ministry of Finance and Sector Participation Government of India, L&DO New Joint Ventures (PSP) CITCO, Finance Department Joint Ventures for existing CITCO projects Privatisation CITCO and Finance Department Annexure A IN\DICATIVE INVESTMENT PROPOSAL OUTLINE There is no standard form for applications. This is an indicative framework providing key heads to be covered in an Investment Proposal to be submitted for funding. 1. Executive Summary Summarise all the important points of the proposal. 2. Lender’s role Propose an equity, debt, or cofinancing arrangement. 3. Background to the project Brief introduction and history of the borrower State the need to undertake the project. Briefly describe the project, including the implementation and operation philosophy. Specify the support obtained from government, lending institutions and investors for the project. State the need for the assistance required from the Lender. 4. The Market Describe the market and marketing arrangements. Include all the following: Basic market orientation: local, national, regional, or export. Projected production volumes, unit prices, sales objectives, and market share of proposed venture. Potential users of products and distribution channels to be used. Present sources of supply for products. Future competition and possibility that market may be satisfied by substitute products. Tariff protection or import restrictions affecting products. price sensitivity market risks Critical factors that determine market potential. 5. Feasibility Study Present a feasibility study establishing the technical, financial, economic, and environmental viability of the project, prepared by a reputable consultant. 5.1Technical feasibility, manpower, resources, and environment: Brief description of the process. Availability of manpower and of infrastructure facilities (transport and communications, power, water, etc.). Breakdown of projected operating costs by major categories of expenditures. Proposed location in relation to markets, infrastructure and manpower. Proposed capacity in comparison with other known competitors. Potential environmental issues and how these issues are addressed. 5.2 Cost Estimates Provide cost estimates for the project, analyzed two ways: major cost category local and foreign currency cost. 5.3 Investment requirements, project financing, and returns: Estimate of total project cost, broken down into land, construction, installed equipment, and working capital, indicating foreign exchange component. Proposed financial structure of venture, indicating expected sources and terms of equity and debt financing. Type of financing (loan, equity, quasi-equity, a combination of financial products, etc.) and amount required from the Lender. Projected financial statement, information on profitability, and return on investment. Critical factors determining profitability. 5.4 Financial and Economic Evaluation Calculate the economic and financial rates of return as well as return on the equity investment. 5.5 Analysis Analyze the risks in implementing and operating the project with the accompanying mitigating measures showing which party will bear the risk and/or pay for the mitigating measures. The risk analysis should be accompanied by a list of proposed insurance coverages for both implementation and operation of the project. 6. Ownership of the project Describe the proposed ownership and management structure of the project. 7. Government support and regulations: Project in context of government economic development and investment program. Specific government incentives and support available to project. Expected contribution of project to economic development. Outline of government regulations on exchange controls and conditions of capital entry and repatriation. 8. Environmental Aspects Provide a site-specific environmental impact assessment report, highlighting environmental impacts and mitigating measures, prepared by an acceptable consulting firm in accordance with Lender’s guidelines. 9. Permitting and Licensing List all permits and clearances required for implementing and operating the project, the issuing authority, and the date of issue or expected issue. 10. Implementation Arrangements Explain the implementation and contractual arrangements for the project, including the construction and supervision methodology. Make sure the followings are included: a bar chart showing major scheduled achievements and completion for each of the major components of the project draft construction contracts sources of possible cost increases and delays Detailed description of liquidated damage provisions and performance bond requirements. Attracting Private Sector Investment In Tourism Sector 1. Taxes 1.1 Rationalisation of taxes Expenditure tax is imposed by National Government while Luxury tax by State Governments. With the Expenditure tax, which is being levied at 10% where room charges are Rs. 3000 or more, being discontinued from 1 June 2003 as per the Union Budget 2003 and no Luxury tax levied, Chandigarh has an advantage over its neighbouring States. Incase in future Expenditure tax or any other tax is levied, then it is preferable to review the effect of total tax while calculating the taxes to be levied on the hotel industry. Moreover these taxes may be charged on the actual room tariff rather on published tariff rate card. 1.2 Other taxes In addition Service tax by Center and Entertainment tax by UT are also being imposed on the hotels. In the Union Budget 2003 services provided by the Hotels are exempted from Service tax. The rates of these taxes, together with expenditure tax and luxury tax, may be decided considering the composite tax (indirect taxes) rate for the hotel industry. The composite tax on hotel industry in India vis-à-vis neighbouring countries is presented in the table below: Composite Tax on Country Hotel Industry (%) India 30* Indonesia 21 Thailand 17 Malaysia 15 Singapore 14 Source: PHDCCI * Estimation includes 10% expenditure tax. 1.3 Sales Tax The Sales tax on beverages and liquor is 12% in the UT, which is moderately higher, compared to other states like Uttar Pradesh, Himachal Pradesh, Punjab, Delhi, etc. Keeping in view the tax structure of other States and especially neighbouring States, Chandigarh may reconsider the sales tax rates for these. 1.4 Transport tax Chandiragh has no transport tax while its neighbouring states Punjab and Haryana are charging the same. A single point tax collection system may be implemented in order to simplify the procedure and ensure smooth movement of tourist inter-states. Further, the tax rate per quarter levied on air-conditioned and non air-conditioned tourist vehicles may be limited by an overall cap amount for the country. 1.5 Power The cost of electricity is a major component in the overall cost structure for a hotel and hence may need to be maintained in line with other comparative States. 1.6 Foreign exchange earnings The UT may consider requesting the Centre for the extension of the time frame of income tax exemption on export earning under section 80HHD of the Income Tax Act 1961. The tourism sector may be granted this extension as like other exporters they too export their services and earn foreign exchange for the country. However, we may mention that it is unlikely that Centre will agree to this request as it has announced phasing out of such incentives. 1.7 Income Tax The UT may also request Centre for providing investments in hotels as well as other industry in the tourism sector with Tax Holiday for a pre-determined period which can be decided in consultation with the various departments and the private sector participants. In order to promote new investments in a particular industry, request for tax holiday for about 5 years for new investments, applicable for 2 year from the current financial year, may be sought. This may likely create positive interest among private sector to invest in these industries with in 2 years to avail the tax holiday. Here too, we may like to mention that the Centre providing such benefits is very unlikely. 2. Investment 2.1 Land rates The Government may consider providing land at concessional rates for construction of hotels and other infrastructure for tourism by private investor. Alternatively, Government may provide land free of cost and acquire stake in the new project constructed on it by private sector through a join venture. The Government has draft a joint venture policy for attracting private sector, a review of which is also incorporated in this report. 2.2 Stamp duty Chandigarh may consider reducing the stamp duty levied especially in the area related to pilgrimages, rural area, etc. 2.3 One window clearance Chandigarh may provide one window clearance to the prospective private sector willing to invest in the UT. This will ensure speedy and efficient investment procedure for the private sector thereby attracting necessary investments. 3. Administrative Structure 3.1 Tourism Advisory Board The UT may strive towards constituting a board or a council comprising members from Tourism Development Corporation, Investment Promotion Board, Industrial Development Corporation, National Tourism Corporation/Department, etc. which will be primarily responsible for co-ordination and monitoring of tourism related activities and projects to ensure proper implementation of Tourism Policy. A detailed suggestion is set out in this report earlier. 3.2 Tourism Development Fund The UT may implement Targeted Funding approach by creating Tourism Development Fund (TDF) which will be recipient of all revenues generated from tourism and tourism related businesses. The Fund will be created by raising low interest loans from multilateral agencies that are actively involved in providing financial assistance to public/private sectors for infrastructure development. A Special Purpose Vehicle may be created where all the funds raised will be parked and a deployed in developing infrastructure to enhance tourism sector. The identification of infrastructure for the development can be done in consultation with other administrative bodies, which are also responsible in developing infrastructure of the state to ensure proper co-ordination between all such bodies. 4. Infrastructure The Government may try to identify areas of strategic importance and involve private sectors in non-strategic areas. Further it may try to segregate core and non-core activities involved in the areas of strategic importance e.g. maintenance of railway platform, maintenance of bus station, etc. and allow private sectors in these activities. Such activities may be provided on a license basis, lease basis, etc. as decided after a proper study of the same. The funds raised by disinvesting of these non-core activities can be utilised in developing infrastructure of the UT. 5. Promotion Chandigarh may plan for an advertising strategy, which will attract tourist from the desired regions and thus benefiting the tourism industry in the UT. This will increase the interest of the private sector in investing in the tourism sector in the UT. The advertising strategy may include amongst others: Shopping festivals, Fun and Fair festivals, Rural art and handicraft festivals, etc. Options for Attracting Private Sector Participation The projects in tourism, like infrastructure projects, too have long gestation period and requires huge capital investment initially. Further, the feasibility of tourism related projects are contingent on development and quality of infrastructure of the region like power, road, railway, water and communications. No single individual agency either the private sector or the Government could finance the sector all alone as the investment required are large and the risk too is relatively higher. Hence part of the load of development of tourism sector may be shared by the inclusion of private sector There are primarily two ways of sharing the responsibility with the private sector: Attracting Private Sector for new projects on all alone basis, Creating Public Private Partnership for new projects, Creating Public Private Partnership for existing projects owned by Government bodies, and Privatisation of existing projects to private sector. A brief note on each method of involving private sector is set out below: 1. Attracting Private Sector for new projects: The private sector may be attracted towards new projects related to tourism like Leisure centers, entertainment parks, theatres, health spa, hotels, etc. by providing incentives for such investments. The list of incentives, applicable period, industry, investment amount, etc may be decided once the type of industry in the tourism sector is identified where Government would like the private sector to accept the responsibility. 2. Creating Public Private Partnership for new projects: The strategy to encourage Public Private Partnership include creating a Tourism Development Finance Company and developing alternative options for partnerships. 2.1 Tourism Development Finance Company A TDFC may be formed with the investment from various state as well as centre owned financial institutions and inviting private sector and international agencies too may be considered. The main role of TDFC will to promote investment in tourism sector by providing long term debt and equity for the same. 2.2 Alternative Models The alternative models for Public Private Partnership for new projects is set out below: Build Operate Transfer (BOO) The private participant invest, executes the project, runs the business and transfer the property to the Government after the agreed span of period is over. Build Operate Lease Transfer (BOLT) The private sector will invest, execute the project, operate the business and then transfer the assets to the Government on completion of agreed span of time. After the hand over of the assets to the Government the private participant will get fixed income by way of lease, which is agreed during the inception. Build Own Operate and Transfer (BOOT) The private sector will invest, execute the project, own the assets created, operate the business and then transfer the assets to the Government on recovery of investments made at a designated rate of return. Until such time the hand over of the assets to the Government is completed, the private participant is responsible for maintenance and operation of the assets. 3. Creating Public Private Partnership for existing projects owned by Government bodies: The private sector may be interested in few existing projects owned by the Government, which the latter may like to share the responsibility of day-today-operation of the business but at the same time would also like to retain stake in the assets. We may like to mention that such properties may be spun-off as a separate entity and private sector may be invited to run the business in following two ways: Formation of Joint Venture by inclusion of a private strategic partner: The private participant will invest funds in the new entity (existing project spun-off) and in return the Government will provide stake in the entity. While the private participant will be primarily be responsible for operating and strategic management decisions, approval of key decisions will required an concurrence from the Government. Issuing license for management control to private parties and retaining ownership with the Government: The private participant neither provides any fund to the Government nor invests funds in the existing project. The ownership of the entity lies with the Government whereas the day-to-day operations are carried out by the private participant for a fixed fee or a revenue sharing model as agreed upon. 4. Privatisation of existing projects to private sector: The step wise strategy for privatisation of the tourism related properties is set out below: 4.1 Setting up a Commission The UT/Center may initiate the process of privatisation by setting up a Privatisation Commission (or Disinvestment Commission) for the purpose of privatisation of Government owned Tourism related properties. The commission will be primarily responsible for reviewing all properties with respect to the Funding Of Tourism Projects Type of Funds The funds required to be raised for projects can be categorised broadly under three heads: Equity, Quasi equity, and Loans. The mix of funding will depend upon the nature of project undertaken, the risk involved, the cash flows envisaged in future, creation of physical assets in order to leverage the project, etc. Source of Fund Most of the Financial Institutes provide all kinds of plain vanilla funds, which are set out above. In addition, they also provide funds such as syndicate loans, Interest rate hedging/swaps, currency hedging loans, etc. in order to match the requirements of the projects. An indicative list of Financials Institutions who may be approached for assistance in investments in Tourism sector are set out below: 1. Domestic Financial Institutes Tourism Finance Corporation of India Infrastructure Leasing Finance of India Industrial Development Bank of India Industrial Finance Corporation of India ICICI Limited Industrial Development Finance Corporation Limited Investment Institutes Life Insurance Corporation of India General Insurance Corporation of India United Trust of India financial status of the properties, priority of privatisation, the strategic importance of the property, etc. 4.2 Identification of Tourism Properties Subsequently, the commission will identify the Government owned properties related to tourism to be disinvested and the approach in which the privatisation process will be adopted. The various strategies, which may be considered for the privatisation, are set out below: a. The related properties may be clubbed together and privatised, b. Create chain of hotels, chain of restaurants, chain of dhabas, etc and privatise each chain, c. Sell certain properties on stand alone basis, etc. d. Create a trail and sell the trail, etc. We may mention that the Government may appoint an advisor at this stage to assist in the process of formulation of detailed property-wise strategy, implementation of the strategy, structuring of the deals in terms of creation of Special Purpose Vehicles, spun-off of units, regulatory requirements, etc. marketing of the transactions and advise Government in the process till the transactions are completed. A detailed scope of work for the advisor may be drafted once the list of properties to be privatised in prepared. State Financial Institutes Haryana State Industrial Development Corporation Haryana Financial Corporation 2. International Financial Institutes International Monetary Fund World Bank Asian Development Bank International Finance Corporation(only to private sector) KFW Line of Credit International Bank of Reconstruction Overseas Private Investment Corporation Application for Fund There is no standard application form for financing a project as it varies from one Financial Institution to another. A company or entrepreneur, foreign or domestic, seeking to establish a new venture can approach the FI by submitting an Investment Proposal. The proposal submitted to FI for consideration should include the preliminary information as set out in Annexure A. Terms and conditions of Funding Terms A list of terms, which are usually a part of any funding agreement, is set out below: Currencies The currency of the loan/fund to be disbursed by the Lender, payment of interest and repayment of the principal amount to the Lender is specified under this head. Lending Rate Lending rate can be broadly of three types: Floating rate: 6-month London Interbank offered rate (LIBOR) for the US dollar and Japanese Yen and 6-month euro interbank offered rate (EURIBOR) for the euro plus a lending spread. Fixed rate : The cost of Bank’s fixed rate borrowing of US dollars, Japenese yen or Swiss francs plus a lending spread. Resetter : Its is similar to fixed rate loans for the initial period which is tailored to the borrower’s need after a specified period. It is charged as a % per annum on progressive amount of undisbursed loan Commitment Fee balance. Its is a flat percentage fee of the loan amount Front-End Fee As may be determined based on project needs and could comprise of a Maturity grace period and a repayment period with final maturity. Following conversion options would be available subject to the Bank’s Loan Conversion conversion procedures as may be applicable at the time of conversion. Options Transaction Fees Disbursement schedule Prepayment Cancellation Repayment Lending Rate Reset / Payment Dates Currency Conversion: The undisbursed amounts/disbursed amounts in whole or part of the undisbursed balance/disbursed amount of the loan may be converted into the three offered currencies. Interest Rate Conversion: The floating lending rate on the whole or part of the disbursed balance may be converted into a fixed-rate at the prevailing market rate or vice versa for whole or part of the loan's residual maturity. Interest Rate Caps and Collars: A cap or collar on the floating lending rate may be purchased for up to the entire disbursed amount, for the whole or part of the residual maturity. A transaction fees may be charged pertaining to the above referred loan conversion. Amount and timing of loan disbursement are structured as per the project needs. All or part of the disbursed and outstanding loans may be prepaid. Floating rate loans could be prepaid on an interest payment due date without a prepayment premium. Prepayment of floating rate loans on a date other than the interest payment due date will attract payment of a premium based on the difference, if any, between the rate at which the proceeds from the prepayment could be reinvested and Bank’s funding cost for the prepaid amount. Prepayment of fixed rate loans or floating rate loans that involve conversion and a corresponding hedge requiring termination will attract payment of hedge unwinding costs, if any. Borrower may cancel all or a part of the undisbursed balance at any time. Equal principal or annuity repayments. Lending rate for floating rate loans are generally reset every six months on an interest payment date. Interest payment are generally due either on the 1st or 15th day of a calendar month and semiannually thereafter. Conditions The primary objective of introducing conditions while providing loan/funds is to ensure that the proceeds of the loan are used only for the purposes for which the loan was granted and with due attention to considerations of economy and efficiency. Thus, the Lender’s loan documents (e.g., loan agreement, guarantee agreement, where relevant project agreement, etc.) stipulate the loan covenants that are considered necessary to ensure the efficient implementation of, and the full realisation of benefits from, projects financed by Lender. The loan covenants can be divided broadly into two categories: general covenants and special covenants: (i) General Covenants General covenants are standard assurances and undertakings that the Lender requires from all borrowers, guarantors, if any, and executing agencies for projects financed by the loans regardless of the special features of a particular project. General covenants include obligations on the part of the borrower, guarantor, if any, and the executing agency: to carry out the project with diligence and efficiency; to repay the loan; to procure goods and services and engage consultants in accordance with specified procedures; to maintain project records and accounts; to provide local currency funds, facilities, and other resources required for carrying out the project; to submit financial statements/ progress reports; and to establish and maintain adequate auditing arrangements with the provision that the Lender will retain the option to communicate directly with the auditors. (ii) Special Covenants Special covenants are those assurances and undertakings which the Lender considers necessary or desirable to obtain from the borrower, guarantor, if any, and the executing agency for each project, having regard to the special features, identified difficulties, and reference points for monitoring of each project. Special covenants are an important part of the loan documents and are so designed that compliance with these covenants will further ensure the successful implementation of the project, sustainable operation of the facilities, and full realization of its benefits. They also provide a basis for the Lender to monitor project implementation and performance. To facilitate monitoring of compliance, special covenants should indicate, wherever possible, the dates by which compliance is expected of various items therein, on the basis of a realistic assessment of project-specific requirements and the related government policy and procedure. Where special circumstances so warrant, special covenants may be used to require the borrower, if any, or the executing agency/guarantor to undertake necessary action even after completion of project implementation so as to ensure sustainability of project benefits. Compatibility of Loan Covenants with Local Laws Covenants are generally compatible with local laws, administrative practices and procedures, sectoral/subsectoral requirements, and socioeconomic conditions of developing member countries. Interventions required Sr Suggestions Agencies Involved 1 Taxation Rationalisation, reduction and SEB, Finance Department tax holidays. and Government of India 2 Land rates Concession CITCO 3 One window Creation of a body for one stop CITCO and SEB clearance processing 4 Structure Creation of a Tourism Advisory Government of Chandigarh Body Creation of Tourism Finance Deparment and Development Fund CITCO 5 Infrastructure Development of infrastructure CITCO, PWD, Finance and involvement of private Department. sector 6 Marketing Promotion of Chandigarh CITCO Tourism 7 Attracting Private Providing incentives SEB, Ministry of Finance and Sector Participation Government of India, L&DO New Joint Ventures (PSP) CITCO, Finance Department Joint Ventures for existing CITCO projects Privatisation CITCO and Finance Department Annexure A IN\DICATIVE INVESTMENT PROPOSAL OUTLINE There is no standard form for applications. This is an indicative framework providing key heads to be covered in an Investment Proposal to be submitted for funding. 1. Executive Summary Summarise all the important points of the proposal. 2. Lender’s role Propose an equity, debt, or cofinancing arrangement. 3. Background to the project Brief introduction and history of the borrower State the need to undertake the project. Briefly describe the project, including the implementation and operation philosophy. Specify the support obtained from government, lending institutions and investors for the project. State the need for the assistance required from the Lender. 4. The Market Describe the market and marketing arrangements. Include all the following: Basic market orientation: local, national, regional, or export. Projected production volumes, unit prices, sales objectives, and market share of proposed venture. Potential users of products and distribution channels to be used. Present sources of supply for products. Future competition and possibility that market may be satisfied by substitute products. Tariff protection or import restrictions affecting products. price sensitivity market risks Critical factors that determine market potential. 5. Feasibility Study Present a feasibility study establishing the technical, financial, economic, and environmental viability of the project, prepared by a reputable consultant. 5.1Technical feasibility, manpower, resources, and environment: Brief description of the process. Availability of manpower and of infrastructure facilities (transport and communications, power, water, etc.). Breakdown of projected operating costs by major categories of expenditures. Proposed location in relation to markets, infrastructure and manpower. Proposed capacity in comparison with other known competitors. Potential environmental issues and how these issues are addressed. 5.2 Cost Estimates Provide cost estimates for the project, analyzed two ways: major cost category local and foreign currency cost. 5.3 Investment requirements, project financing, and returns: Estimate of total project cost, broken down into land, construction, installed equipment, and working capital, indicating foreign exchange component. Proposed financial structure of venture, indicating expected sources and terms of equity and debt financing. Type of financing (loan, equity, quasi-equity, a combination of financial products, etc.) and amount required from the Lender. Projected financial statement, information on profitability, and return on investment. Critical factors determining profitability. 5.4 Financial and Economic Evaluation Calculate the economic and financial rates of return as well as return on the equity investment. 5.5 Analysis Analyze the risks in implementing and operating the project with the accompanying mitigating measures showing which party will bear the risk and/or pay for the mitigating measures. The risk analysis should be accompanied by a list of proposed insurance coverages for both implementation and operation of the project. 6. Ownership of the project Describe the proposed ownership and management structure of the project. 7. Government support and regulations: Project in context of government economic development and investment program. Specific government incentives and support available to project. Expected contribution of project to economic development. Outline of government regulations on exchange controls and conditions of capital entry and repatriation. 8. Environmental Aspects Provide a site-specific environmental impact assessment report, highlighting environmental impacts and mitigating measures, prepared by an acceptable consulting firm in accordance with Lender’s guidelines. 9. Permitting and Licensing List all permits and clearances required for implementing and operating the project, the issuing authority, and the date of issue or expected issue. 10. Implementation Arrangements Explain the implementation and contractual arrangements for the project, including the construction and supervision methodology. Make sure the followings are included: a bar chart showing major scheduled achievements and completion for each of the major components of the project draft construction contracts sources of possible cost increases and delays Detailed description of liquidated damage provisions and performance bond requirements. Prioritisation of selected projects Activity Short term Medium Long term 1-5 years term 5-10 10-20 years years Basic Tourism Infrastructure Projects 1. Setting up a system of coordination between Departments through a “Mission Approach” 2. Assessing the economic impact of tourism in Chandigarh through annual surveys and the use of multipliers 3. Setting up police outposts in the new concept “Cultural/ Tourism Centre” 4. Setting up a system for accreditisation of shops and transportation 5. Creating Tourist/ Cultural center Visitor generating projects 6. Promoting traditional cuisine 7. Horse Race track 8. Amusement Park 9. Linking the sightseeing 10. Conference center to attract business travelers 11. Developing the City Centre 12. Adventure tourism & Wildlife Tourism Job creation Potential of Projects Activity Total Project Direct jobs Indirect cost created jobs created Basic Tourism Infrastructure Projects 1. Setting up a system of coordination between Nil Departments through a “Mission Approach” 2. Assessing the economic impact of tourism in Rs 10 lakhs 50 50 Chandigarh through annual surveys and the use per year of multipliers 3. Setting up police outposts in the new concept Nil 5 20 “Cultural/ Tourism Centre” 4. Setting up a system for accreditisation of shops Nil 5 20 and transportation 5. Creating Tourist/ Cultural center Rs 75 lakhs 350 1000 Visitor generating projects 6. Promoting traditional cuisine Nil 7. Horse Race track Rs40 –50 1000 4600 crores 8. Amusement Park Rs 30 crores 1000 4000 9. Linking the sightseeing Rs 70 lakhs 100 400 10. Conference center to attract business travelers Rs 10 crores 300 1200 11. Developing the City Centre Nil ? 12. Adventure tourism & Wildlife Tourism Nil - Funding of Projects Activity Total Cost to Other project cost Govt funding sources Basic Tourism Infrastructure Projects 1. Setting up a system of coordination between Departments through a “Mission Approach” 2. Assessing the economic impact of tourism in Rs 10 lakhs/ Rs 10 lakhs/ Chandigarh through annual surveys and the use yr year of multipliers 3. Setting up police outposts in the new Nil Nil concept “Cultural/ Tourism Centre” 4. Setting up a system for accreditisation of Negligible Neglibible shops and transportation 5. Creating Tourist/ Cultural center Rs 75 Lakhs Rs 75 lakhs Corporate Visitor generating projects 6. Promoting traditional cuisine Nil 7. Horse Race track Rs 40-50 Variable Pvt Sector crores 8. Amusement Park Rs 30 crores Variable Pvt Sector 9. Linking the sightseeing Rs 70 lakhs Rs 70 lakhs Lease 10. Conference center to attract business Rs 10 crores Rs 10 crores Some travelers Corporate 11. Developing the City Centre 12. Adventure tourism & Wildlife Tourism Nil Economic impact of short term projects Activity Total Potential Multiplier Project Ongoing Effect Cost Revenues Basic Tourism Infrastructure Projects 1. Setting up a system of coordination between Departments through a “Mission Approach” 2. Assessing the economic impact of tourism in Chandigarh through annual surveys and the use of multipliers 3. Setting up police outposts in the new concept “Cultural/ Tourism Centre” 4. Setting up a system for accreditisation of shops and transportation 5. Creating Tourist/ Cultural center Rs 75 lakhs Rs 42 lakhs Rs85 lakhs Visitor generating projects 6. Promoting traditional cuisine Nil Rs 33 lakhs Rs70 lakhs 7. Horse Race track Rs 40-50 Rs 3.13 Rs 6.5 crores crores crores 8. Amusement Park Rs 30 Rs 10 Rs 20 crores crores crores 9. Linking the sightseeing Rs 70 lakhs Rs 27 lakhs Rs 55 lakhs 10. Conference center to attract business Rs 10 Rs 2.6 Rs 5.5 travelers crores crores crores 11. Developing the City Centre 12. Adventure tourism & Wildlife Tourism Name of AnnualGrowthrate Year Year Year Year Year Project Financial Parameters Rate Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 5 6 7 Year 8 9 10 Cultural/ Tourist centres Project Funding-Rs lakhs 75 Funding Yrs 1-5 75 Funding Yrs 6-10 Funding Yrs 10-20 Revenues Rental/ lease- Rs.lakhs 5% 42.4 44.52 46.75 49.08 51.54 54.11 56.82 59.66 62.64 Operational Costs 5% 24 25.2 26.46 27.78 29.17 30.63 32.16 33.77 35.46 Operating profits 18.4 19.32 20.29 21.3 22.37 23.48 24.66 25.89 27.19 Traditional Cuisine Project Funding-Rs lakhs Nil Revenues Visitor numbers 000's 5% 45000 47250 49613 52093 54698 57433 60304 63320 66485 69810 Visitor spends-Rs.lakhs Rs 60/ 5% 27.02 28.37 29.79 31.28 32.85 34.49 36.21 38.02 39.92 41.92 Rental/ lease- Rs.lakhs 5% 6.75 7.09 7.44 7.81 8.20 8.61 9.05 9.50 9.97 10.47 Total Revenues 33.77 35.46 37.23 39.1 41.05 43.1 45.26 47.52 49.9 52.39 Operational Costs-Rs lakhs 5% 24 25.20 26.46 27.78 29.17 30.63 32.16 33.77 35.46 37.23 Operational Profits 9.77 10.26 10.77 11.31 11.88 12.47 13.10 13.75 14.44 15.16 Name of AnnualGrowthrate Year Year Year Year Year Project Financial Parameters Rate Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 5 6 7 Year 8 9 10 Horse Race Track & Club Project Funding-Rs lakhs 5,000 Funding Yrs 1-5 4,000 Funding Yrs 6-10 1,000 Funding Yrs 10-20 Revenues- Rs lakhs Visitor numbers 000's 5% 105.0 110.3 115.8 121.6 127.6 134.0 140.7 Club Memberships 25/yr 600 625 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 Monthly dues 5% 4.2 4.41 4.63 4.86 5.11 5.36 5.63 Corporate Boxes 5% 50 52.50 55.13 57.88 60.78 63.81 67.00 Programme 5% 47.6 49.98 52.48 55.10 57.86 60.75 63.79 Share of tote/ Race charges 5% 111 116.55 122.38 128.50 134.92 141.67 148.75 Gate money-Rs.lakhs 5% 43.5 45.68 47.96 50.36 52.87 55.52 58.29 Rental/ lease- Rs.lakhs 5% 11.25 11.81 12.4 13.02 13.67 14.36 15.08 Total Revenues 600 625 317.6 330.9 345 359.7 375.2 391.5 408.5 Amusement Park Project Funding-Rs lakhs 3,000 Funding Yrs 1-5 3,000 Funding Yrs 6-10 Funding Yrs 10-20 Revenues Visitor numbers 000's 5% 500 525 551.3 578.8 607.8 638.1 670 703.6 738.7 Visitor spends-Rs.lakhs Rs200/ 5% 1000 1050 1103 1158 1216 1276 1340 1407 1477 Total Revenues 1000 1050 1103 1158 1216 1276 1340 1407 1477 Note : These two projects should be tendered out. The above spreadsheets give Operational revenues and visitor numbers for decision making purposes Name of AnnualGrowthrate Year Year Year Year Year Project Financial Parameters Rate Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 5 6 7 Year 8 9 10 Linking the sightseeing Project Funding-Rs lakhs 70 Funding Yrs 1-5 70 Funding Yrs 6-10 Funding Yrs 10-20 Revenues Visitor numbers 000's 550 5% 550 577.5 606.4 636.7 668.5 702 737.1 773.9 812.6 Visitor spends-Rs.lakhs Rs5/ 10% 27.5 31.76 33.35 35.02 36.77 38.61 40.54 42.56 44.69 Operational Costs-Rs lakhs 5% 15 15.75 16.54 17.36 18.23 19.14 20.1 21.11 22.16 Operational Profits 12.5 16.01 16.81 17.65 18.54 19.46 20.44 21.46 22.53 Conference Centre Project Funding-Rs lakhs 1,000 Funding Yrs 1-5 1,000 Funding Yrs 6-10 Funding Yrs 10-20 Revenues Conference visitors 000s 5% 55 57.75 60.64 63.67 66.85 70.2 73.71 77.39 81.26 Visitor spends-Rs.lakhs Rs200/ 5% 110 121.3 127.3 133.7 140.4 147.4 154.8 162.5 170.6 Rentals -Rs lakhs 5% 18 18.9 19.85 20.84 21.88 22.97 24.12 25.33 26.59 Exhibition visitors 000s 5% 60000 63000 66150 69458 72930 76577 80406 84426 88647 Visitor spends-Rs.lakhs Rs 25/ 5% 15 16.54 17.36 18.23 19.14 20.1 21.11 22.16 23.27 Rentals- Rs lakhs 5% 18 18.9 19.85 20.84 21.88 22.97 24.12 25.33 26.59 Social function visitors 000s 5% 50000 52500 55125 57881 60775 63814 67005 70355 73873 Visitor spends-Rs.lakhs Rs200/ 10% 100 115.5 121.3 127.3 133.7 140.4 147.4 154.8 162.5 Total Revenues 261 291.1 305.7 321 337 353.8 371.5 390.1 409.6 Operational Costs-Rs lakhs 5% 112 117.6 123.5 129.7 136.1 142.9 150.1 157.6 165.5 Operational Profits 149 173.5 182.2 191.3 200.9 210.9 221.5 232.5 244.1

Tourism Policy

Dadra and Nagar Haveli

Administration of Union Territory of Daman & Din and Dadra r Nagar Haveli District Izzduatriea Centre, Department of Industries N O T I F I C A T I O N no. ore/mums/ir-zo1a/aoia-1s/ l9 nat«a $ /oz/fora The Administrator of UT Administration of Daman & Diu and Dadra 8s Nagar Haveli is pleased to introduce Industrial Policy — 2018 to provide fresh impetus to industrial growth and employment generation in line with new policy initiatives of the Union Government with mission to create Daman 8s Diu and Dadra 8s Nagar Haveli region as a valued investment destination with best-in-class infrastructure by providing an investor friendly, efficient and transparent business climate, the right resources and market linkages to make these UTs a preferred investment destination. The Policy enclosed herewith shall come into effect from the date of its notification. This is issued with the approval of the Hon’ble Administrator, Daman & Diu and Dadra & Nagar Haveli vide Diary No. 350607 Dated 14/05/2018. By order and in the name of the Administrator, Daman 8s Din and Dadra 8s Nagar Haveli Encl: Industrial Policy — 2018 (Pg. 1 to 25) Copy to:- l) PPS to Administrator, DD & DNH ( Ch i Parekh J General manager (DIC} Department of Industries 2) PA to Advisor to Administrator, DD & DNH 3) All Secretaries, DD & DNH 4) All H.O.s, DD & DNH 5) All Industrial Association, DD & DNH 6) Dy. Secretary (Official Language), DD for translation in Hindi 7) The SIO, NIC, DD & DNH for uploading on website 8) Dy. Director (Printing), DD & DNH for publication in Official Gazette U.T.s of Daman & Diu and Dadra & Nagar Haveli Industrial Policy —2018 The UT Administration is committed to the sustainable and inclusive development of the UT of Daman & Diu and Dadra & Nagar Haveli. The Government is keen to accelerate the economic and industrial development of these UTs through growth and employment oriented policies and schemes that turn the UTs of Daman & Diu and Dadra & Nagar Haveli, into the most preferred investment destination. The UT Administration had adopted the existing Industrial Policy in the year of 2015. However, the need for adopting an updated policy framework, incorporating new schemes and thrust areas, was increasingly being articulated by key stakeholders of the economy - the Government, Industries and the Business Community. This new Industrial Policy is a first step in the direction of making the UT of Daman & Diu and Dadra & Nagar Haveli a preferred Industrial and Investment Destination. The policy aims for sustainable industrialization with focus on employment generation, product competitiveness, value addition in products and higher export oriented growth while conserving all aspects of environment. It envisages strong and specific initiatives to ensure timely and hassle-free guidance / clearances to new entrepreneurs. The policy has specific monitoring mechanism with provision for regular assessment of its performance. The new Policy intends to leverage the comparative strengths of the UT and to propel it among the most preferred global business destinations. The new Industrial Policy will be an instrument through which the Administration could achieve the vision of “Prosperous UT o/ Damon & Diu and Dadra & Nagar Haveli” Post 1991 period, the Indian economy has witnessed remarkable economic growth, riding on the strength of huge private investment, infrastructure improvements and regulatory changes. Progressive Page 1 of 25 Thank you for using www.freepdfconvert.com service! Only two pages are converted. Please Sign Up to convert all pages. https://www.freepdfconvert.com/membership

Tourism Policy

Delhi Tourism Policy

CHAPTER-10 TOURISM Delhi city is sprinkled with dazzling gems: captivating ancient monuments, fascinating museums and art galleries, architectural wonders, a vivacious performing-arts scene, fabulous eating places and bustling markets. With its rich and diverse cultural heritage, Delhi is also used as a gateway for traveling to cities of India. The city is significant for the role it has played throughout history, having been the centre of an empire for the majority of this millennium. It is an important city in the Indian sub continent and comparisons have often been made to other great cities of the world. However, very few cities carry with them, to such an extent, the weight of several layers of continuous history. One can have a fascinating glimpse into the past in Old Delhi, with its labyrinth of narrow lanes, old havelis, and colourful bazaars. Rickshaws wind their way through this crowded, bustling capital of the Mughals, where life continues, much as it did hundreds of years ago. Modern Delhi has a lot more to offer. Delhi has a modern, well-planned and extensive Metro network that connects all corners of Delhi; this network is still growing. New roadways and flyovers have improved connectivity, the latest of which is the Signature Bridge, an ambitious project of Delhi Tourism. Delhi Tourism is on a mission to change status quo and ensure that Delhi becomes a world-class tourist destination and the leader in art, culture, music, theatre, film and entertainment. In 1911, British shifted their capital from Calcutta to Delhi. After independence in 1947, New Delhi was officially declared as the Capital of India. Delhi being National Capital Territory, received maximum foreign travelers and NRIs visiting India. There are Outlays to make Delhi an environmental & eco friendly tourism and cultural & heritage destination. There is need to spread awareness among tourists as well as its citizens regarding Delhi’s glorious past. The schemes of Tourism Department have been implemented by the DTTDC, an undertaking of the Government of National Capital Territory of Delhi incorporated in 1975 to promote tourism in Delhi. Delhi being National Capital Territory, received a large number of foreign travelers and NRIs visiting India. Revised outlay & expenditure of Annual Outlay 2016-17, Approved outlay & Revised Annual Outlay 2017-18 and Annual Outlay 2018-19 for Tourism Department are as under: [` in crore] Sector 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 BE RE Exp BE RE Exp Tourism 26.00 8.08 117.00 18.00 13.18 44.00 Total Outlay of ` 46.21 crore kept in B.E. 2018-19 on Tourism. This includes revenue budget of ` 46.06 crore and capital budget of ` 0.15 crore. An amount of ` 44 crore is kept for implementation of various schemes, programmes and projects under Tourism sector. 1. Tourism Infrastructure Budget Allocation 2018-19 : ` 500 Lakh I. Up-gradation of Food courts, temporary shops / craft stalls etc. at Dilli Haat, INA Dilli Haat, INA was constructed and inaugurated in March 1994. The Haat needs up gradation in view of wear and tear of infrastructure and changes in user requirements. Most of the area needs face lifting works. However, Food courts, temporary shops and adjoining areas are in very bad condition and needs suitable up gradation and face lifting works. Temporary shops are made with thatch roofing which is of temporary in nature and needs frequent replacement and causes leakages which damage the articles of the artisans, hence the roofing may upgraded to semi permanent structure. Due to frequent damages it gives bad look. Food courts which are in very bad condition also required to be upgraded since no major face lifting had been done since its construction. II. Renovation and Up-gradation of Coffee Home – Connaught Place The Coffee Home is situated in prime location of Connaught Place and serves the cuisines and coffee tea for visitors. Since its inception no major renovation work was taken up. The upgradation work planned to be taken up with some of the alterations. There is only one existing entry from side to coffee home hence one additional entry from main path have been proposed to be opened in up gradation phase. Better Public Conveniences are to be provided at a suitable place in the coffee home since existing conveniences are on back side of Coffee Home. The up gradation work will also consist of suitable furnishing also. III. Development of Open Air-theatre, etc. at Kala Gram near Garden of Five senses DTTDC has in its possession a plot measuring 5.27 acres adjacent near Garden of Five Senses. The plot of land has been allotted by the Development Department, Government of Delhi. DTTDC proposes to develop this site as venue for holding concerts and festivals. The basic infrastructure like water, electricity, barricading, public conveniences, cafeteria, parking etc. would be developed by DTTDC. For day to day operation an operator may be appointed by DTTDC through E-tendering process. This is a on-going state plan-scheme. Development of plot for holding concerts and festivals. During the year 2017-18, an Open air theater has been developed. Further development of venue on this piece of land is to be done during 2018-19. IV. Conceptualization / Documentation Appointment of Transactional Advisor for Development of Tourism Projects It is proposed to take up and develop new Tourism Projects in Delhi. For development of new Tourism Projects, it is required to conduct preliminary feasibility study, conceptualize the new ideas and other related work prior to the actual start of the work for the new Tourism Projects. For these works, the expenditure may be incurred on account of consultation fee to Architect, transaction advisor etc. To prepare concept paper on tourism projects at various existing properties of the Corporation, there is a need of Transactional Advisor/Consultant. V. Renovation & up-gradation of Azad Hind Gram DTTDC has set up Azad Hind Gram at National Highway-10 before Bahadurgarh Border in Tikri Kalan Village. The complex is spread over 06 acres and has a memorial on Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose depicting select episodes from his life. The complex also houses a museum on Indian National Army with audio visual facility. The complex has a life size statue of Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose. DTTDC would like to upgrade and renovate the Netaji Memorial, Indian National Army Museum, public conveniences and parking facility at the Complex. Repair and Up-gradation of pond and renovation of Restaurant complex and Kiosks. VI. Construction of Coffee Home at Janak Puri DTTDC proposed to construct a Coffee Home at Janak Puri subject to more allocation of funds during the year. VII. Construction of Coffee Home at I.P. Extension DTTDC proposes to construct a Coffee Home at I.P. Extension subject to more allocation of funds during the year. An expenditure of about ` 320 lakh incurred during the year 2017-18 on Tourism Infrastructure. 2. River Front Development of Yamuna Budget Allocation 2018-19 : ` 5 Lakh Every city in the world is associated with a river flowing through it. More than 40 kms. of Yamuna River flows through Delhi. Every Major city like London, Paris etc. has developed the river front of its city and is a major tourist’s attraction. Even in India River Sabarmati in Ahmedabad has been developed by the State Government and has become a public place for its citizens. The Yamuna River to the north of the Wazirabad Barrage is the most pristine stretch of the river in Delhi. The east bank of the river in the stretch along Sonia Vihar is to be developed in an ecological manner to enhance and improve natural habitats and the biodiversity of the riverfront area. The Area of intervention consists of the following: • Around 700 Acres of Land between the Yamuna River and the Sonia Vihar- Pushta Road • Around 5.8 km of the Sonia-Vihar Pushta Road from the Wazirabad Road intersection to the Delhi Border Proposals have already been submitted to the Delhi Govt. for approval of Cabinet. Once the proposal is approved by the Cabinet, consultant for the project will be appointed. Since the project involves development of river fronts the approval of National Green Tribunal will be required and consultant appointed will develop the scheme of the project according to the compliance of the guidelines issued by NGT. Once the project proposal is approved by the NGT, NOC from the Land Owning Agency i.e. Delhi Development Authority will require. However in a meeting held with VC, DDA and Minister of Tourism, Delhi Govt., it was assured by the VC, DDA that once the proposal is agreed by the NGT requisite NOC of DDA will be issued. Once the above approvals/NOC issued, the development work may be started by DTTDC. To begin with, it is proposed to develop the River front in Delhi upstream of the Wazirabad Bridge. The River front would consist of public conveniences, promenades, jogging track, cycle track, sandpit, volleyball courts, restaurants, snack bars and parks. 3. Promotion of Tourism - Delhi as a Destination Budget Allocation 2018-19 : ` 1055 Lakh This scheme has been divided in Three parts (Part A & B). Part A Budget Allocation 2018-19 : ` 1045 Lakh Branding Delhi: It is proposed to create a new campaign called “Brand Delhi”. We will re- develop the online presence of destination Delhi through websites, Apps, Maps, Social Media and Micro-sites. Delhi, bearing a rich heritage and history, has immense potential to become one of the most preferred tourist destinations not only in India but also globally. It is land of monuments, dotted with ruins forts, temples with many chapters of history that have unfolded to make Delhi what is today. Myriad episodes of history, a lineage and significant monuments like the Qutab Minar, the stunning Humanyun’s Tomb, the magnanimous Red Fort, the city of Old Delhi. This Delhi, the Old Fort and many more are epitomes of varied historical eras and this is where the real strength of the City lies as far as the tourism in Delhi is concerned. Delhi has a lot to boast about and hence arises the dire need to promote Delhi as one of the most sought after tourist destinations not only in the domestic but also in the international arena. Undoubtedly, tourism requires careful Outlayning and management and in the absence of a concrete Tourism Policy, there is no set Outlay drawn to market the city in the International market so as to showcase the potential of the city as a Tourist Friendly destination. There is a need to initiate steps to market Delhi more effectively and in a strategic manner on the lines of other state Tourism Boards. In order to keep pace with the growing competitive market, it is proposed that, on the lines of other state Tourism departments to carry out aggressive campaigns to Brand Delhi. With an objective to promote tourism in and around the capital city, Delhi Tourism & Transportation Development corporation Ltd. has been playing a role of catalyst and been taking proactive steps in making the city a Tourist Friendly destination. The activities proposed to be undertaken under the scheme emphasized the need to aggressively Brand Delhi through various available mediums. Production of Tourist Literature, Folders, Leaflets, Maps, City Guides, Brochures, CDs : To market Delhi more effectively and in a strategic manner on the lines of other state tourism Boards. DTTDC plans to undertake campaigns for Branding Delhi as a Tourism Destination at national level through various mediums including release of advertisements / advertorials in Travel magazines & Press advertisement, online social media, production of pictorial brochures on Delhi, Radio Jingles, outdoor publicity through Hoardings, Street Furniture, Metro Stations etc. It is also proposed to produce short films on promotion of Delhi – as a tourism Friendly destination and telecast as TV commercials on various channels. Publicity through Print and Electronic Media/ Internet : The plan includes: Production of Film on Delhi: Promoting Delhi as a Tourist Destination and as Film Shooting Destination – Edited versions of both the films for TVC. Promotions through TVCs on various channels, Release of Advertisements in Magazines (Travel & Tourism), Outdoor publicity through Metro Stations, Backlit panels at Airport, Bus shelters, Street Furniture, Air Baggage tags etc., publicity for Delhi Tourism activities like Tours, Travel, Adventure Activities, Dilli Haats through release of advertisements in newspapers and magazines and Social Media. Organization of Fairs & Festivals : Delhi Tourism has been actively organizing cultural events in Delhi to showcase this capital city as a tourist and cultural friendly destination not only for foreign tourists but for domestic travelers and the citizens of Delhi. In this context, it is pertinent to mention that the promotion of cultural tourism has been the main stay of Indian Tourism policy and accordingly, the rich heritage of our country at large and Delhi as a city in particular has been projected from time to time. Our neighboring states such as Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh, Himachal Pradesh etc. are excellent examples where cultural tourism has already acquired international positioning and has acted as a catalyst to attract large number of tourists to these destinations. Apart from National & International tourists, NCT of Delhi has its own population of more than 20 million. The citizens of Delhi attend the Fair & Festivals organized by Delhi Tourism with fun and frolic. Participation in National Fairs/ Conferences/ Marts/ Exhibitions : National tourism fairs, conferences, travel marts and travel exhibitions are important for interaction with travel industry, media, airlines and other opinion makers. Further, this is helpful in direct marketing of tourist products and services to the consumers by direct interfacing. Presently, DTTDC participates in limited national tourism fairs. These interactive activities will also be organized in Delhi and simultaneously Delhi will also participate in such exhibitions, marts and conferences within India. Ek Bharat Shreshtha Bharat : The scheme of “Ek Bharat Shreshtha Bharat” launched by Ministry of HRD, Govt. of India which envisages strengthening of existing emotional bonding between the people of our country by promoting and showcasing the rich heritage and culture, tourism, wealth, educational specificities, agricultural traditional practices etc. of each state allowing people to understand and appreciate the diversity that is India, while fostering a sense of common identity. Accordingly engagement matrix for NCT of Delhi has been earmarked with the 8 states of North-Eastern States: with Sikkim & Assam (2016-17), Tripura & Mizoram (2017-18), Arunachal Pradesh & Meghalaya (2018-19) and Manipur & Nagaland (2019-20). The DTTDC proposed to organize culinary festivals with opportunity to learn culinary practices, promotion of Home Stay for visitors, promotion of Rajya- Darshan for tourists, organizing familiarization tour for tour operators of one state, prepare and share with the partner states a book containing information on their culture, customs, traditions, flora & fauna etc. for dissemination to schools colleges, organizing film-festival in the partner state with sub-title, showcase wearing of additional attire of the partner state. Promotion of Delhi as a Film Shooting Destination : Govt. of Delhi under the directions of Ministry of I & B, Govt. of India has appointed MD & CEO, DTTDC as the nodal officer for facilitating Film Shootings in Delhi vide order no. F2/797/TSM/11 dated 3rd August, 2016 of Dy. Secretary (Tsm), GNCTD. Cinema is undoubtedly a powerful tool for the development of a nation. Its impact is immense and it plays an important role in economic expansion. Delhi has been a part of films for a long time now. Its scenic beauty, picturesque locations and historical monuments form interesting backdrops for movies. Delhi also embodies the stark, almost absurd, contrasts of India: A World- Class metro system, the chaos of Old Delhi and the Colonial Serenity of Lutyen’s Delhi. Subsequently, a Film Shooting Facilitation Cell was created within the corporation on the direction of the Chief Secretary, Govt. of Delhi with an objective that DTTDC acts as a nodal agency to act as a bridge between the filmmakers and the stakeholder agencies for facilitating single window clearances of permission for Film Shootings in Delhi. DTTDC is in the process of introducing “Single Window Clearance Mechanism” for film making facility so that the legal formalities to shoot in the city can be performed by visiting only one Government Office. Several steps are being taken to introduce a smooth system for granting permission to Film Producers, to provide them consolidated information on instructions/ guidelines issued by various Departments of Delhi and Ministries of the Government, and to make film shooting a hassle-free experience. Major Tourism Events Sponsored by the Govt. City Information Service (1280) Part B Bed & Breakfast Scheme Budget Allocation 2018-19 : ` 10 Lakh This scheme started in the month of October, 2007 and to be continued during the year 2018-19 to provide budget accommodation to tourists coming to Delhi and enjoy the traditional Indian Home & Culture and also have the confidence of the families support and protection and go back with pleasant memories. In the Bed & Breakfast accommodation in Delhi, there are two categories facilities i.e. Silver and Gold. The Registration Fee for Gold Category is ` 5000/- and for Silver Category ` 3000/-. The basic facilities available under the Silver and Gold Categories are: Facilities Silver Gold Floor Area of Room 120 sq. ft. 200 sq. ft Size of Bathroom 30 sq. ft 40 sq. ft Washing Machine Not Mandatory Mandatory Refrigerator in the room Not Mandatory Mandatory Telephone with Extension Not Mandatory Mandatory In the bedroom, double bed, AC, Furnishing etc., is mandatory. Maximum 06 rooms can be given to the establishment. The total number of Gold and silver category establishment and rooms registered under this scheme as on 31.03.2017 and target for FY 2018-19 is given below: Status till 31.03.2018 Target 2018-19 Category No. of Establishment No. of Rooms No. of Establishment No. of Rooms Gold 39 160 45 185 Silver 233 965 245 1015 Total 265 1131 290 1200 The list of Bed & Breakfast Establishments registered under the scheme is available on the website of DTTDC and Directory of Bed & Breakfast Accommodation in Delhi was also published and distributed from time to time. An expenditure of about ` 655 lakh incurred during the year 2017-18 on Promotion of Tourism in Delhi. 4. Beautification of Entry Points of Delhi Budget Allocation 2018-19 : ` 250 Lakh Development of Guru Tegh Bahadur Memorial at NH-I and other entry points of Delhi (i) Entry Point-I at NH-8 (ii) Entry Point-II at Ghazipur (iii) GTB Memorial at NH-I DTTDC proposes to beautify the road entry points to the city. These entry points would have the facility of tourist information office, public convenience, snack- bar, parking, first-aid facility etc. The entry gates would highlight the rich heritage of the city. DTTDC has constructed Guru Tegh Bahadur Memorial at Singhu Border (NH- 1), G.T. Karnal Road, spread over land measuring 11.87 acres as a deposit work of Urban Development Department. The project was set-up under the scheme of beautification of entry point of Delhi. In the landscaped tranquil background, the 24 metres high central pylon with petals at the base represents the Guru and his strength. The C arches denote his three followers and the monoliths represent the 10 Sikh Gurus with their sayings inscribed on them. Urban Development Department has transferred the project to Tourism Department, Govt. of NCT of Delhi. DTTDC is the executive agency for upkeep, maintenance and operation of the project. The MOU between DTTDC and Tourism Department was done in the March 2017 and expenditure of about 243 lakh incurred during the year 2017-18 for upkeep, maintenance and operation of the project. 5. Grant-in-Aid to DTTDC for Tourist Information Centres Budget Allocation 2018-19 : ` 150 Lakh Delhi Tourism is running Tourist Information Centers at all the main embarkation points in Delhi besides information offices in Kolkata and Chennai. Delhi Tourism disseminates information and distribute literature to the tourists from these offices and a large number of foreign and domestic tourists avail these facilities. The information centers are at the following places in and outside Delhi: • Domestic Airport- Terminal-I • New Delhi Railway Station • Coffee Home, Baba Kharak Singh Marg • I Center, Baba Kharak Singh Marg • Govt of India Tourist Office, Janpath • Dilli Haat, INA • Kolkatta • Chennai 6. Grant-in-Aid to Delhi Institute of Hotel Management & Catering Technology (DIHM & CT) Budget Allocation 2018-19 : ` 100 Lakh (This is GIA but used for capital works) a. Construction of Researcher Block (Boy’s & Girls Hostel) b. Construction of Residential Staff quarters c. Purchase of equipments for labs Delhi Institute of Hotel Management & Catering Technology is an autonomous body established in the year 1983 at Kashmere Gate. The institute was upgraded to the present new building in the year 2012 where the basic infrastructure was available for conducting the classes. During the same year, there was an increase in intake of the students from 60 to 120. Phase- I of the building which includes the academic and administrative block, has been completed and handed over by PWD in 2007 to DIHM & CT. Outlay kept in the Annual Outlay 2018-19 is for construction of Researcher Block (Boys & Girls Hostel) and Residential Staff quarters. During 2013-14, an amount of ` 3 crore was released by the Govt. of NCT of Delhi to DIHM&CT and also DIHM&CT received grant of ` 2 crore from Govt. of India. DIHM&CT has planned to start some revenue generating courses in 2018-19 and impart the in service training to the cooks, waiters, housekeeping and other MTS staff of Government Guest Houses, Govt. Offices, Canteens and Cafeteria etc.. DIHM&CT will start short term summer courses in four trades i.e. Bakery & Patisserie, Indian Cookery, Snacks Cookery and Chinese Cookery for general people, specially students, ladies and housewives. 7. Skill Development of Students in Government Schools Budget Allocation 2018-19 : ` 100 Lakh The Scheme “Skill Development of Students in Government Schools” (Aatm Nirbharta Ki Aur) is an initiative of Govt. of NCT of Delhi. It is a skill development scheme, aims to channelize the energy of the young students who have passed 8th & 10th standard and are 18 to 28 years age group. Aspirant students will be given training in the hospitality sector in the field of cookery, bakery, housekeeping etc. DIHM&CT is the implementing agency of the scheme. The venue will be the schools under the Education Department, GNCTD. During 2015-16, GIA of ₹ 75 lakh has been released to DIHM&CT towards implementation of this scheme. Initially, 4 Govt. schools has been identified by the Education Department, GNCTD. The DIHM&CT will recruit co-ordinators, data entry operators on contract for monitoring and guiding the schools and trainees. Government will incur the cost of course expenditure on equipment charges which are one time charge. 8. INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT FOR DESTINATIONS AND CIRCUITS (CSS) Budget Allocation 2018-19 : ` 2240 Lakh Under this scheme, the following sub-schemes are covered: a. Tourist Complex at Said-ud-Azaib (CSS) b. Grant-in-aid to DTTDC for Chhawala and Kanganheri Water Sports (CSS) c. Grant-in-aid to DTTDC for development of Soft Adventure Park at Sanjay Lake (Capital Assets) (CSS) d. Grant-in-aid to DTTDC for new facilities in Delhi Haat INA, New Delhi (Capital Assets) (CSS) e. GIA to DTTDC for Development of Delhi Haat, Pitampura (CSS) f. GIA to DTTDC for Development of Delhi Haat, Janakpuri (CSS) g. GIA to DTTDC for celebration of Incredible India Festival (CSS) h. GIA to DTTDC for Swadesh Darshan (CSS) The Ministry of Tourism extends Central Financial Assistance to the State Governments/Union Territory Administrations for tourism projects identified in consultation with them for the improvement of existing tourism products and also for developing new ones. Under the Centrally Sponsored Scheme, “Infrastructure Development for Destinations and Circuits”, 100% Central Assistance is given for development of destinations/ circuits including mega projects of world standard and also for rural tourism infrastructure development. The Ministry of Tourism provides financial assistance up to ` 5 crore for the development of Destinations and ` 8 crore for Circuits. The upper limit of financial assistance has been increased to ` 25 crore and ` 50 crore for development of identified mega destinations and circuits respectively. The focus under this revised scheme will be on the improvement of existing product and developing new tourism products to the world standard. It will also focus on Integrated Infrastructure Development of the tourist sites. These tourist sites/destinations would be carefully selected based on its tourism potential. The aim would be to provide all infrastructure facilities required by the tourists within such destinations and circuits. Master Outlaying of these destinations and circuits will be undertaken so as to develop them in an integrated holistic manner. The aim will be convergence of resources and expertise through coordinated action with State Governments / U.Ts and Private Sectors. Tourist Destinations and Circuits in each State would be identified in consultation with the State Governments and would be taken up for development. This would include activities ranging from preparation of a master Outlay to implementation of the master Outlay. Projects to be taken up under this scheme should follow an integrated, projectised, area development approach. Comprehensive DPRs should be prepared for each project after consultations with all the stakeholders. Some of the projects implemented by Delhi Govt. under CSS are as discussed below: I) Tourist Complex at Said-ud-Azaib (CSS) Outlay 2018-19 : ` 35 Lakh (For Capital Assets) DTTDC has developed one of the finest Gardens spread over an area of 20 acres of Garden of Five Senses, Said-ul-Ajaib. Garden of Five Senses is also the venue for the DTTDC flagship festival i.e. Garden Tourism Festival which is held every year. DTTDC is developing the following theme garden at Garden of Five Senses:- • Herbal Garden • Rose Garden • Cacti Garden • Butterfly garden • Fragrance garden Ministry of Tourism, GOI sanctioned an amount of ` 192.45 lakh for the project “Development of Theme Garden at Garden of Five Senses, Said-Ul-Ajaib, New Delhi” during 2011-12 with sanction accorded for release of ` 153.96 lakh being 80% of CFA as the first installment for starting the work. Tourism Department has issued a Sanction dated 28.03.2012 of ` 50 Lakh (CFA) to DTTDC for Development of Theme Garden at Garden of Five Senses, Said-Ul-Ajaib, New Delhi under CSS- Outlay out of GOI released amount ` 153.96 lakh. Under this scheme, there was unspent balance of ` 53.96 lakh as on 01.04.2014. An expenditure of ` 40.00 lakh has been incurred during 2014-15. No expenditure has been incurred during 2017-18. There is unspent balance of ` 13.96 lakh as on 01.04.2018. Ministry of Tourism, GOI will release balance amount of ` 40 lakh after furnishing of UC by the DTTDC. II) GIA to DTTDC for Development of Water Sports Complex at Chhawla and Kanganheri (CSS) Budget Allocation 2018-19 : ` 40 Lakh (For Capital Assets) Chhawla Water Sports Complex: DTTDC has taken 2.77 acres of land at Chhawla from Irrigation and Flood Control Department on lease basis. DTTDC has set up Chhwala Tourists Complex on Island in Nazafgarh Drain near the campus of Border Security Force. The site is well connected by Road via Nafargarh – Kapashera Road and Metro Line Via Dwarka Sector -21. The following facilities are being created at this site:- • Elevated Walk ways, Restaurant, Boat Jetty, fish Jetty, Toilet Block, Machan, Parking, Pedestrian Path and Club House. Ministry of Tourism, GOI sanctioned an amount of ` 297.87 lakh during 2007-08 and released an amount of ` 238.30 lakh. DTTDC has already submitted the UC of an amount of ` 381.89 lakh to MOT, GOI for release of balance funds of ` 48.92 lakh. Kanganheri Water Sports Complex: This project is being developed on the piece of land measuring 11.44 acres, which is approximately 2 km from Chhawla Bridge and is located in Kanganheri Village in South West Delhi. The project has accessibility through Nafargarh – Kapasehra Road and Metro Line via Dwarka Sector 21. The following facilities are being created at this site:- • Platform for tents, administrative block, canteen, toilet block, pantry, balloon plaza, water body, overhead tank, underground tank, cycle track, store block and paved parking. Ministry of Tourism, GOI sanctioned an amount of ` 416.21 lakh during 2007-08 and released an amount of ` 332.97 lakh. DTTDC has already submitted the UC of an amount of ` 414.81 lakh to MOT, GOI for release of balance funds of ` 59.57 lakh. III) GIA to DTTDC for Development of Soft Adventure Park at Sanjay Lake (CSS) Budget Allocation 2018-19 : ` 30 Lakh (For Capital Assets) DTTDC has taken over 6.3 acres of land at Sanjay Lake on license fee and revenue sharing basis from DDA for a period of 20 years. The DTTDC has also been allowed boating activities in the lake adjacent to the park. The following structures / works have been completed at the project:- 1. Restaurant Block having carpet area of 119 sq. mts. This includes sitting area, pantry, store, kiosks and publicity utility. 2. Portal cabin structures:- a. Souvenir Shops b. Ticket window c. Toilet block {2} d. Rooms {4} 3. Rain water Harvesting 4 Elevated walk way : 90 M (approx) 5. Walk way along lake : 250 M (approx) 6. Outlayters : 280 M (approx) 7. Pedestrian walk way The boundary wall has been constructed on three sides of the plot of land and on one side the area is protected by the lake. DTTDC is in the process of selection of operator for this project. Basic structure will be provided by the DTTDC and operator will set up the required equipment to operate the Park. The investment is likely to be about ₹ one crore to make the project operational towards the cost of equipment for the activities being proposed, which are as under:- Inflatable Rock Climbing Wall, Rock Climbing (permanent), Burma Bridge, Monkey Bridge, Spider Web, Dismantle able tented accommodation, Monkey crawling, Mountain Biking, Paint ball, Archery, Rifle shooting, Pit Jump, Rappelling, Zorbing, Commando net, Cat walk, Flying Fox, Dirt Track, Day and overnight camping and Bungee Jumping water based game/boating in the lake is also proposed to be allowed. In addition the operator shall also be required to activate the Restaurant Block and other facilities created at the project. Ministry of Tourism, GOI sanctioned an amount of ` 451.82 lakh during 2010-11 as CFA on 07.05.2010 and released an amount of ` 361.46 lakh being 80% CFA as the first installment for starting the work. DTTDC has already submitted the UC of an amount of ` 400.75 lakh to MOT, GOI for release of balance funds of ` 39.26 lakh. An expenditure of ` 499 lakh (` 56 lakh during 2010-11, ` 304 lakh during 2011-12, ` 75 lakh during 2012-13, ` 64 lakh during 2013-14) has been incurred till April 2014 by the DTTDC. An Amount of ` 361.46 lakh (released by GOI earlier) kept in GNCTD account has been released to DTTDC during 2014-15. IV) GIA to DTTDC for Up-gradation of Dilli Haat at INA (CSS) Budget Allocation 2018-19 : ` 10 Lakh (For Capital Assets) DTTDC had set up a tourism project, Dilli Haat at INA, in pursuance of Government Policy for promoting and preserving our immense heritage of human skill. The objective of this first Haat of its kind in the country was to provide a platform to the artisans of different parts of the country to display their ethnic wares. A take off from the traditional ‘bazaar’ where local artisans sell their merchandise, it offers the visitors a fascinating glimpse of India through its array of crafts, foods and folk performances. The project attained vast popularity among foreign & domestic tourists and won PATA Gold Award in the year 1993 and titled with the award of first barrier free project in the year 2005 in view of its wide success. The Haat fascinated Prince Charles so much that he stretched his whistle-stop visit to an hour long fiesta during his visit in the year 2003 and desired to put up a similar Haat in London. The Corporation has organized Dilli Haat exposition at Trafalgar Square in London in association with Govt. of India, Ministry of Tourism in June 2005. The Haat is being visited by most of the foreign delegations during their visit to India. The Haat has completed its 14 years of success, however requires the additions of new concepts like Art Gallery, International Fine Dining, Museum, setting up of more craft stalls in view of meet out the increasing demands. Ministry of Tourism, GOI sanctioned an amount of ` 72.85 lakh during 2011-12 and released an amount of ` 58.28 lakh. DTTDC has already submitted the UC of an amount of ` 249.05 lakh to MOT, GOI for release of balance funds of ` 14.57 lakh. V) GIA to DTTDC for Development of Dilli Haat at Pitampura (CSS) Budget Allocation 2018-19 : ` 10 Lakh (For Capital Assets) VI) GIA to DTTDC for Development of Dilli Haat at Janakpuri (CSS) Budget Allocation 2018-19 : ` 100 Lakh (For Capital Assets) Delhi Tourism & Transportation Development Corporation Ltd. (DTTDC) has developed 3rd Dilli Haat at Janakpuri. This project has been developed on a land measuring 08 acres allotted by DDA to DTTDC on lease for 20 years on revenue sharing basis. This Dilli Haat is set up with an objective to promote the national and international tourism activities and to cater the growing tourism needs in West Delhi and Delhi. This project is going to add value to the entire Township, residency and officers in and around west Delhi. 1. The following facilities are provided in Janakpuri Dilli Haat :100 craft shops – to be allotted to the registered artisans of DC (Handloom) and DC (Handicrafts), Ministry of Textile, Govt. of India. 2. 85 open platforms shops - to promote art, craft and handloom and in line with Dilli Haat vision. 3. Dormitory (80 beds) – for specific use for artisans and craft men at nominal charges. 4. Food court - 14 shops are being created to provide food of different states on India through state tourism corporations. 5. Exposition hall – to promote art, cultural events and various initiative / exhibition etc. 6. Music store and museum in two baskets towers – to promote and provide platform for Indian classical music and literature, keeping in view the theme of this Dilli Haat, which is Music. 7. Auditorium and Amphitheatre – an open auditorium with seating capacity of 800 persons and air conditioned auditorium with seating capacity of 800 persons. 8. Public convenience Public convenience such as parking, drinking water, toilets, tourist facilitation center, landscaping, seating spaces, elevators etc. will be provided. ATM and courier services are also proposed. In addition to the above some commercial activities are also incorporated including air conditioned shops, food courts, cafeteria, and fine dining restaurants with banqueting facilities. Originally, Finance Department has restricted and approved the estimated cost of the project as ` 79.96 crore after approval of the EFC of ` 81.44 crore in the meeting held on 20.12.2011. (With GNCTD share of ` 25 crore, GOI share of ` 25 crore and DTTDC share of rest amount of ` 29.96 crore). Govt. of NCT of Delhi already released an amount of ` 25 crore as financial support to DTTDC as mentioned in the EFC minutes in the approved EFC cost of ` 79.96 crore. Ministry of Tourism, GOI has sanctioned an amount of ` 24.36 crores, out of which ` 8.85 crore were released earlier, ` 4.50 crore in 2015-16 and ` 10 crore in 2017-18 by the Ministry of Tourism, GOI. VII) GIA to DTTDC for Celebration of Incredible India Festival (CSS) Budget Allocation 2018-19 : ` 15 Lakh DTTDC organized Incredible India Festival at Baba Kharak Singh Marg, New Delhi from 1st - 15th October 2010. The best of Indian Handicrafts, Handlooms and variety of Indian Cuisine was available to the tourists during the festival. The festival was organized on turnkey basis through an agency. The expenditure incurred on this festival was ` 94.92 lakhs. Ministry of Tourism, govt. of India sanctioned ` 100 lakhs and released ` 80 lakhs for this festival. Utilization Certificate has already been submitted for release of balance payment of ` 14.92 lakhs. VIII) GIA to DTTDC for Swadesh Darshan (CSS) Budget Allocation 2018-19 : ` 2000 Lakh The scheme is 100% centrally funded and funds are available under this scheme for development of theme based tourism circuits. Project is of development of 7 Heritage Routes with special focus on Mehrauli Node along with construction of elevated walkways connecting Qutub Metro Station to Qutub Minar. Delhi Heritage Circuit comprises of 7 circuits Mehrauli, Tughlaqabad & Suraj Kund, Hauz Khas & Safdarjung’s Tomb, Nizamuddin, Purana Qila & Lodhi Gardens, Shahjahanabad and New Delhi. Spiritual circuit comprises of Dargah Matka Pir, Dargah Hazrat Nizamuddin, Dargah at Chirag Delhi and Quttub Bakhtiyar Kaki, Mehrauli. The Metro Station of Qutub is very far from Qutub Minar and visitors coming to Qutub Minar on Metro find it difficult to reach Qutub Minar due to poor connectivity. Adjacent to Qutub MInar is Mehrauli Archaeological Park which has a number of notified monuments like Jamali Kamali, Quli Khan’s tomb, Raja ki Baoli, Metcalf house besides a number of other monuments. It is proposed that an elevated walkway may be constructed connecting Qutub Metro Station with Qutub Minar which may pass through Mehrauli Archaeological Park. The elevated walkway may have the facility of getting down near important notified monuments like Jamali Kamali, Quli Khan’s Tomb etc. in the Mehrauli Archaeological Park and may finish at Qutub Minar. The cost of the project is approx. ` 100.00 Crores. The appointment of consultant for preparation of detailed project report is under process. After preparation of DPR by the consultant, the Ministry of Tourism, Govt. of India will consider & sanction the scheme. Afterwards, the clearances from different agencies will be taken up.

Tourism Policy

Chandigarh Tourism Policy

GOVERNMENT OF INDIA MINISTRY OF TOURISM AND CULTURE DEPARTMENT OF TOURISM MARKET RESEARCH DIVISION Final Report On 20 YEAR PERSPECTIVE PLAN FOR SUSTAINABLE TOURISM DEVLOPMENT IN UNION TERRITORY OF CHANDIGARH March 2003 Submitted by India Tourism Development Corporation TLC Marketing Pvt. Ltd. Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu India Private Limited 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh Contents for the 20 Year perspective Tourism Master Plan 1. Executive Summary 1 2. The approach a. Guidelines for developing 20 year perspective Master Plans as issued by the Department of Tourism, Government of India 6 b. Background of Consortium partners 11 i. ITDC ii. Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu iii. TLC Marketing Pvt Ltd c. Approach 15 d. Approach to Environmental Impact Assessment 19 3. Background on the State 21 a. History b. Physical features, Flora and Fauna c. Current infrastructure i. Access – Road, Rail, Air ii. Water & Sewage iii. Power – Electricity iv. Industrial Estates – list of major corporates d. Demographics versus other Northern States District Profiles e. Chandigarh Headquartered Corporate Houses 4. Current Tourism scenario in the State 38 a. Current Chandigarh Tourism Policy b. Inventory of Accommodation c. Current Tourism Statistics 1 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh i. By city ii. Comparative with other Indian States – employment, project spends d. Taxes on Tourism activities e. Fairs & Festivals f. Roles of relevant bodies i. State Tourism Development ii. Urban Development & Town Planning iii. Industrial Development g. Tourism activities of contiguous States 5. Assessment of Tourism Attractions of the State 65 a. How other “City States” have developed tourism b. Inventory of attractions i. Versus criteria ii. By type of tourist and linkages c. Current State Tourism Policy versus National Tourism Policy d. Potential markets and market segments for the State e. Shortlisted projects f. Approach to Environmental Impact Assessments 6. Marketing State Tourism. Case studies of Kerala, Rajasthan and Uttaranchal 79 7. Implementation of shortlisted projects 90 a. Setting up a system for coordination of Departments b. Assessing the economic impact of tourism 2 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh c. Setting up Police outposts d. Setting up a system for accreditisation of shops and transporters e. Creating a Tourist/ Cultural Centre f. Promoting traditional cuisine g. Horse race track & Club h. Amusement park i. Linking the sightseeing j. Conference Centre k. Adventure Tourism and Wildlife Tourism 8. Attracting the Private Sector investments in Tourism 126 9. Summary Tables 147 a. Prioritisation of projects b. Job creation c. Funding of projects d. Visitor numbers e. Economic impact 3 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This 20 year perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh attempts to identify short, medium and long term tourism projects for the Union Territory of Chandigarh using the National Tourism Policy as a guideline. However, all existing and planned projects of Chandigarh Tourism have also been addressed. In these cases, thoughts that complement/ supplement the current thinking have also been listed. We have examined the success of several other “City States” and how they have positioned themselves. Very few, like the Vatican, have the benefit of historical attractions. Some like the Bahamas, Bermuda and Mauritius have natural attractions like beaches. Some traditional trading centers like Hong Kong, Singapore and Dubai have developed as financial hubs. In nearly all cases, however, city states have developed man made attractions with an emphasis on world class recreation and leisure. Gambling – Macau, Monaco & Sun City Horse Racing in Hong Kong & Dubai Sporting events – Singapore, Hong Kong, Dubai, Monaco and Sun City Entertainment events – in all the above, Seychelles etc. Interestingly, most do not rely on immediate neighbouring countries as source markets. Several suggested projects do not have any precedent in India. As such, projections of usage and hence revenues are difficult to make. However, these projects have been endorsed by knowledgeable individuals in the Travel & Tourism industry based on their personal experiences. The Plan makes some observations on current practice. Several specific actions and projects have been recommended. These have been divided into those projects to develop and sustain tourism infrastructure and those that generate visitors. These are summarized in the following pages. In all cases, the involvement of the private sector has been examined. The Plan shortlists the following projects Basic Tourism Infrastructure Projects 1. Setting up a system of coordination between Departments through a “Mission approach” on the lines of Rajasthan’s Rajiv Gandhi Mission on Tourism Development a. Coordination between Chandigarh Tourism/ Chandigarh Hotels/ Town Planning/ PWD (B&R)/ PHD/ Police/ Trade Associations/ NHAI/ Indian Railways b. The Mission should have a mission statement, a manageable number of objectives and specific activity milestones for effective review. 2. Assessing the Economic Impact of Tourism in Chandigarh. Tourism will not get the attention it deserves unless it can demonstrate the economic and social benefits it generates. a. We have suggested annual surveys and the use of multipliers to measure the impact of tourism investments and of tourist spendings 3. Tourism Police outposts. Safety and security are a major concern of travelers. a. We have suggested Tourism Police outposts be set up in the proposed “Tourist Centres” in Chandigarh. The list of locations can be expanded over the Plan period. 4. Accreditisation of Shops and transporters. These are two areas where most tourists feel most insecure in terms of being cheated. a. For shops, we have suggested accreditising shops that have price tagged items and a reasonable return/ refund policy. Shops will carry a Chandigarh Tourism plaque and be advertised in an official map. For Taxis/ auto rickshaws. Must be metered and carry tariff cards. These will be identified with a plaque 5. Cultural/ Tourism Information Centre. This should showcase Chandigarh and be a cross between Dilli Haat and The National Crafts Museum. This center should provide information and reservation capabilities for potential tourists to Chandigarh and neighbouring States. These will provide employment to artisans/ performing artists a. We recommend arts/ crafts, State cuisine and performing arts be showcased b. We recommend some permanent stalls backed by open spaces for stall for celebrating State festivals c. Incorporated into “Recreation & Leisure Centres” in Kishangarh 6. Promoting Traditional Cuisines. Chandigarh has eight neighbouring States each with a rich cultural tradition. We propose that food and cultural festivals be held on a regular basis. We further propose that the existing facility of Kalagram, which has held successful festivals in the past, be utilised. 7. Horse Race Track & Club. There is no good Horse Race track in North India. North India is also home to about 10 stud farms. Hotels in cities like Pune and Bangalore have their week end occupancies boosted by punters from major metros. The Race Club can have other facilities to attract a permanent membership. 8. Amusement park. The Rock Garden/ Sukhna Lake/ Golf Course area is already one hub of tourist activity. An area for an amusement park, for a Sports Complex and a Tourist Health Resort have already been ear-marked in the Chandigarh Master Plan. We propose the Amusement Park be marketed to families traveling Delhi- Shimla with young children to encourage an overnight break. 9. Linking the sightseeing. The distance between the Rock Garden and the area identified for the Amusement park is a long walk but a short auto-rickshaw ride. We propose a vintage narrow gauge railway be set up to link all the points in this Recreation & Entertainment area. 10. Conference Center to attract Business Travellers. Chandigarh Tourism has already identified a plot in Sector 31 next to the CII Regional HQ. We believe that this can cement Chandigarh as the commercial center of North India. 11. Developing the City Centre – Sector 17 – as a social and cultural hub. There is already a trend in this direction. We recommend a partnership between the Sector 17 shop owners and Chandigarh Tourism to develop a calendar of events. We also recommend a relaxation in Excise rules in terms of bar licence costs and hours of operation. 12. Adventure Tourism & Wildlife Tourism. We do not recommend any additional activity in this area other than the ongoing levels. 13. Attracting the Private Sector. We have recommended a package of incentives to attract the Private Sector to invest in tourism related projects in Chandigarh. In all visitor generating projects we have recommended roles for the private sector As a “City State”, Chandigarh does not have the scope – or the space - to develop new projects over a 20 year time span. There is no particular need either in terms of funds or manpower to spread the suggested projects. Guidelines of Dept. of Tourism for 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plans 1. Year wise phasing of investments required having regard to resources available 2. Plan should indicate short term & long term plans, targets and ground realities. 3. Plan should indicate all activities by agency with timeframes 4. Assess the existing tourism scenario in the state/UT with respect to existing traffic levels and inventory of - Natural resources - Heritage & other socio-cultural assets - Quantitative/ demographic factors - Services & infrastructure available 5. Plan should review the status of existing development/ investment for the development of tourism in the region 6. List and evaluate existing potential tourist destinations and centers and categorise them on the basis of - inventory of attractions - infrastructure available - degree of popularity - volume of traffic flow 7. Plan should analyse and categorise existing destinations and centers as - stand alone - part of a circuit - niche attractions for special interests 8. Plan should assess the existing infrastructure levels at identified destinations/ centers in terms of - quality of roads/ transportation facilities - civic amenities - en route transit facilities - boarding and lodging facilities 9. Plan should assess traffic flow for assessment of infrastructure requirements based on - Past growth - Suggested links and integration - Future expected developments - Likely investments from State - Investment climate/ incentive for private sector 10. Plan should attempt indicative cost configuration of likely investment on infrastructure under different heads and prioritise investment needs over 20 years 11. Plan should identify existing as well as new tourism projects including - expansion/ augmentation, - upgradation of services/ facilities - Destinations & centers 12. Plan should undertake product conceptualization cum feasibility for identified projects covering - locational evaluation - schematic product planning - quantification of individual product parameters - assessment of investment levels - project viability 13. Action plan for implementation of identified projects along with development of infrastructure in conformity with - State/ Central policy objectives & guidelines - National development and funding agencies - WTO’s Bali declaration 14. Project wise potential for employment generation including for women 15. Projection of domestic and foreign tourist arrivals for each proposed tourist place 16. Prioritise schemes based on employment potential and tourist arrivals 17. Prepare inventory of existing accommodation including paying guest and proposed needs split by various providers including various State Govt depts 18. Each project to be scutinised and finalized with a view to suggesting State Tourism projects to foreign funding agencies 19. Explore sources of funding such as FIs, TFCI. - Suggest incentives for private sector 20. Suggest institutional machinery in the State to oversee/ supervise the development of Tourism infrastructure 21. Build in facilities for performance of local artistes, cultural troupes 22. Cultural complexes to be suggested with the financial help of the State Dept of culture 23. Handicraft shops to be suggested. These can be run by women 24. Include development of potential health resorts. 25. Plan should have an Executive summary 26. Plan should include attractive packages/ schemes to attract private sector investments 27. Environmental issues shouls be dealt with in sufficient detail and EIA made in respect of new projects 28. Plans should include - carrying capacities - instruments of spatial and land use planning - instruments for architectural controls - strategy for local community participation & protection of cultural identity - Awareness programmes for local 29. Measures for mitigating adverse environmental impact and rehabilitation 30. Strategy for privatisation of State and State Tourism Corp owned tourism related properties 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan THE CONSORTIUM We believe that 20-year Tourism Master Plans require detailed knowledge in several domains. To address this need we have formed a consortium of experts. The consortium comprises of India Tourism Development Corporation – ITDC – Consultancy Division with relevant past experience in Master Plans, Technical Consultancy and project execution. TLC Marketing Pvt.Ltd, a marketing consultancy empanelled by The World Tourism Organisation (WTO), Madrid for various aspects of Tourism Development. TLC Marketing will ensure a balanced tourism plan that is marketable to both developers and the Tourist industry Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu, an international firm of Chartered Accountants and consultants with a wide range of experience in perspective planning in various industries. Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu also have access to their global expertise in the area of Tourism Master Planning. RELEVANT EXPERIENCE India Tourism Development Corporation ITDC was established in 1966 with the objective of developing tourism infrastructure and promoting India as a tourism destination. ITDC has a Consultancy Division which has completed many projects. ITDC has the capability of conducting Techno-Economic feasibility studies, providing Engineering and Technical Services, Mangement Consultancy and Advisory services, consultancy for Adventure Tourism. Assignments already completed by ITDC include Feasibility Reports for hotel projects in Baroda, Calicut, Cochin, Kanpur, Kohlapur, Lucknow, Nagpur, Nainital, Pine, Rishikesh, Varanasi, Raipur, New Delhi, Calcutta, Bangalore and Agartala 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan Tourism Master Plans for Assam, Nagaland, Orissa, Pondicherry, Sikkim, Punjab and Tripura. Technical consultancy for multiple hotels, youth hostels, forest lodges and restaurants Special projects for Rail Yatri Niwas, Indian Railways Catering, College of Combat, Institute of Water Sports at Goa. Project consultancy/ Execution – 28 hotels, the IITTM in Gwalior. TLC Marketing Pvt Ltd. The Directors of TLC Marketing have been involved with Tourism Development for almost 30 years and have had exposure to Tourism Planning in Egypt, Mexico and India. This has been mainly from the project developer’s aspect and are familiar with the requirements of the parties that invest in Tourism Development. They are also familiar with all aspects of tourism including resorts, cruises, timeshare, charters, conferences etc. Some relevant projects undertaken by the directors of TLC Marketing include Study for the India Convention Promotion Bureau on promoting conferences of various sizes to India Assignment with The Planning Commission for Tourism Development Plans for Uttaranchal and Uttar Pradesh. This included the development of a “tourist train” concept Review of Hotel classification norms covering Heritage and Resort hotels for the Govt. of India, Department of Tourism Feasibility studies for business and leisure hotels at over 40 destinations all India. Entry strategy for a hotel company into India looking at mid level hotels. This involves studying business destinations across India Strategy for a chain of Ayurvedic Spas, initially in the North of India Entry strategy into Timeshare for both mid-market and Luxury Resorts Launch of an Outbound Adventure Tour Operator 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu India Private Limited Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu believes that for achieving a client’s business objectives, a variety of knowledge and skills are required. Our national coverage and international experience allows access to professionals in the industry and other areas of specialisations. Our clients include government bodies, non-government organisations, public sector organisations, private companies and international agencies. Brief details of some of our assignments in the hospitality, tourism and entertainment sectors is set out below: International assignments in hospitality and the tourism sector are detailed below: • Privatisation of Hungary Hotels, which comprises some 45 hotels and over 250 restaurants, in association with the Swiss Bank Corporation and Cazenove & Co. Our UK offices worked with our Budapest office on this extensive assignment. • Business valuation of Astir Hotel Company. We assisted the National Bank of Greece on the proposed sales as part of the Government’s privatisation programme. • Advised the public enterprises reform and divestiture secretariat of the Ministry of Finance, Government of Uganda, on the divestiture of Government owned hotels. • Valuation of four state-owned hotels in Morocco prior to their intended privatisation and sale for the Government of Morocco. In conjunction with the Deloitte & Touche Corporate Finance Group, investment memoranda were subsequently prepared to assist in the privatisation process. Indian assignments in Hospitality and Tourism Sector • Strategic advice to Quality Inns Private Limited. • Business plan for a holiday resort based in Kerala. This is under implementation. • Advisory services provided to an international chain of hotels • Business advisory services for Resort Condominiums International • Business advisory services for Singapore based company, for setting up operations in India in the area of serviced apartments and estate development. 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan • Business valuation and due diligence review for Landbase India Limited, • Business advisory services for The Radisson Hotel. • Entry strategy, valuation, negotiations and joint venture identification for Keystone and Venkys. • Trade survey for travel agents and tour operators for a large multinational company. • Review of project parameters and returns compiled for the airport expansion planned for Chennai by the Airports Authority of India. • Economic Feasibility study for setting up a permanent Trade Fair Venue, Madras International Exposition Limited, under the aegis of Federation of Indian Export Organisations (FIEO). Privatisation/ Disinvestment experience • Bharat Heavy Plates & Vessels Ltd., Visakhapatnam • RBL Limited, Calcutta • Tractors Corporation Limited • Bharat Goldmines Limited • Lamps Division of HMT Limited • Paradeep Phosphates Limited Ongoing disinvestments assignments include • IDCOL Cement Limited • The Fertiliser and Chemicals Travancore Limited • Instrumentation Limited • Braithewaite & Co. Limited • Bharat Heavy Plate limited 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan APPROACH Our approach is as follows 1. Review existing Tourism Policy a. This is reviewed in conjunction with stated National Tourism Policy as State Tourism activities should be in synch with National Policy b. Thisis also reviewed in terms of “Best Practice” of other Indian States and some Internationally successful players. 2. Validate Proposed projects a. Plans still to be implemented were reviewed to validate their broad feasibility 3. Suggest new Tourism Products a. This is done with costs, revenues, timelines and responsibilities. b. A broad Economic Impact assessment is made for each suggested product for both primary and secondary effects. Objective Our objective is to develop 20-year Perspective Tourism Master Plans that encourage sustainable tourism by achieving a balance between the growth of tourism on one hand and the impact on natural, heritage and cultural resources on the other. Criteria The Critical Criteria would be that the Plan should be viable. In other words, it should be attractive and marketable to all agencies involved – The traveler, the Travel industry, State and Government agencies, Financial Institutions, Tourism project developers and last but not least to the local population. The Plan will Clearly indicate short term and long term projects and targets Identify agencies involved and the actions required to be taken by each 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan Ensure that each action will have a time frame and an indicative cost Ensure each project will also indicate possible developers and possible sources of funding. Financial structuring arrangements, where relevant will also be indicated. Endeavour to involve the private sector in the development of the plans. This will ensure a buy-in to the finished product. Be based on secondary data – published data, supplied by the State and information obtained in discussions with informed individuals. METHODOLOGY Conduct Inventories Identify existing and potential - attractions - Infrastructure - Access - Environmental impact - Human factors Identify Specific projects Develop balanced Tourist products around each identified attraction Detailed Project analysis Identify each element, the possible developers, sources of funds, incentives etc Final Recommendations Shortlist projects, prioritise over 20 years. - Tourist projections - Employment and other economic benefits Identifying the attractions – the reasons for visiting. 1. The first step would be to make an inventory of all possible visitor attractions both current and potential. These would be studied under a. Long stay – natural and activity resorts such as hill/ beach/ health & fitness/ sports/ wildlife/ shopping and other activities 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan b. Short Stay destination – Business visitors, conferences, weekend stays, pilgrimage c. Short stay itinerary – where the attraction is part of an itinerary and dependent on other links 2. Each attraction will be assessed for “Carrying capacity” using absolute numbers as well as indices such as Tourists/ sq.km, Tourists/ 1000 population. This assessment will use international benchmarks and Best Practices. 3. The Environmental sensitivities will be addressed by a strategy to measure the impact on a. Air quality b. Water and water bodies c. Nature, both flora and fauna d. And on the attraction itself. 4. Based on the above, an assessment of the present and future needs of infrastructural services will be undertaken to cover a. Water b. Electricity c. Sewage and waste disposal d. Communications 5. Based on the potential markets for visiting the attraction, an assessment of the present and future requirements for access will be identified by a. Road b. Rail c. Air d. Water transport 6. There are Human Factors that will also be addressed. These will cover a. Employment b. Inflationary impact c. Cultural impact d. Alienation of locals/ Displacement 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan Identifying and Conceptualising Specific Tourism Products Having assessed the attractions available and the broad feasibility of each, the Plan will e develop a balanced Tourist product around each attraction. The Tourist product consists of the following 1. The attraction – the reason for the visit 2. Accommodation – requirements at each level a. Propose incentives for balanced development 3. Recreational facilities – to supplement the attraction. Eg. a hill resort could have rock climbing, paragliding, river & lake fishing, golf, entertainment and shopping 4. Local transportation a. Airport/ station transfers, shuttles, city sightseeing, public transportation 5. Information a. Signage, guides, brochures, photo ops 6. Wayside amenities a. Rest stops, service stations 7. Safety & Security a. Accreditisation of shops etc b. Tourism police Detailed Analysis and Final Recommendations After identifying the Tourism Products to be developed, the Plan will prioritise them over the 20-year perspective, each project will be analysed to detail The key agencies/ organizations involved in developing the product The investment required Identify possible investors and sources of funds and the processes to access these Possible incentives for the development Identify environmentally threatened places and buildings for restoration. Projection of tourist numbers – domestic and international Employment potential – occupations and income levels Other economic, social and cultural benefits Suggestions on marketing the products Environmental Impact Assessment Studies Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) studies are complex exercises. They are also dependent on the specific projects. For example, projects next to water bodies would require a much deeper assessment of impact on water than other projects that would confine the study to the impact on ground water resources. In the Technical Bid for this project, the Consortium had clearly stated that we are not competent to undertake EIA and would not include them in the final report. However, we are listing out the essential aspects of EIAs. Each attribute must be monitored on a regular basis. Frequency of monitoring may vary from daily for some air samples to annually for soil characteristics. EIAs are best undertaken by specialist organizations like TERI, TARA etc. Attribute Parameters Ambient air quality SPM, RPM, SO2, NO2, CO, CO2, HC etc. Usually 24 hour samples twice a week. Meteorology Surface wind speed and direction, temperatures, relative humidity, rainfall Water quality Physical, Chemical and bacteriological parameters of surface and ground water Ecology Existing flora and fauna. For environmentally sensitive projects, inventory and state of health Noise levels Noise levels in DB(A) Light Lighting levels and impact on fauna, insects Soil Characteristics Parameters relating to agriculture and afforestation potential Land use Trends in land use change for different categories Socio Economic aspects Socio-economic characteristics, labour force characteristics, population statistics and existing amenities, current inflation Geology and mining Geological history, minerals details Hydrology Drainage area and pattern, nature of streams, acquifier characteristics of the area 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh HISTORY India attained Independence in 1947; but in the process the territory of British India was partitioned to form India and Pakistan. The large and prosperous Province of Punjab, was divided and Lahore, its capital, fell within the borders of Pakistan, leaving Indian Punjab without a capital. Those who had been compelled to migrate to India keenly felt the loss of Lahore, a city much loved by its inhabitants. Though there was a temporary secretariat at Shimla in Himachal Pradesh, the political leadership decided on the construction of a modern and accessible capital. In March 1948, the Government of Punjab in consultation with the Government of India approved a 114.59 sq. km tract of land at the foot of the Shivalik Hills in Ropar district as the site of the new capital. The city was named after the Mother Goddess Chandi, (Chandi - Goddess of Power + garh - fortress). The temple of the Goddess is on Chandigarh-Kalka Road. The temple is known by the name of Chandi Mandir. Prior to the construction of Chandigarh, the present site was a typical rural tract, with a rainfed subsistence agricultural economy. It was dotted with 24 village settlements, surrounded by cultivated land parcelled into consolidated irregular, small fields. Each settlement had a number of mango groves remnants of which are still visible in parts of the city. There were banyan or pipal trees within the settlements or near village ponds. The majority of houses were kutcha or partially pucca. Among the physical features, the choes, with their broad, shallow, and dry sandy beds, constituted an important element of landscape. These represented undulations in an otherwise level topography. Hills and mountains provided a panoramic background. The new city was needed not only to serve as a capital but also to resettle thousands of refugees who had been uprooted from West Punjab. India’s first Prime Minister, Jawaharlal Nehru enthusiastically supported the project and took sustained interest in its 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh execution. When he visited the project on April 2, 1952, he declared: “Let this be a new town symbolic of the freedom of India, unfettered by the traditions of the past, an expression of the nation’s faith in the future.... The new capital of Punjab will be christened as Chandigarh-a name symbolic of the valiant spirit of the Punjabis. Chandigarh is rightly associated with the name of Goddess Chandi — Shakti, or power.” The responsibility for the design was given to the French architect Le Corbusier or the Crow. With the help of his cousin Pierre Jeanneret, and that of the English couple Maxwell Fry and Jane Drew (alongwith a number of Indian architects prominent amongst them Chief planner Narinder S. Lamba & Chief Engineer J.C. Verma) Chandigarh, the present capital, came into existence at the foothills of the Shivaliks. Profile of People It was built in 1953 and serves as the capital of two states, i.e. Punjab and Haryana. It is administered by the Central Government and is hence classified as an Union Territory. Since 1986 there has been much talk about officially handling it to Punjab on the basis of demography. The issue however continues to be a matter of discussion with many political disputes. Chandigarh had to be a city of migrants as it was built on the land acquired and cleared of existing settlements. One of its objectives was to rehabilitate persons displaced from Pakistan in 1947. Early settlers in the city were government officials transferred from Shimla, the temporary capital of Punjab after partition and displaced persons from Pakistan in search of a new home. According to 1991 census data, around two-third of the city's population were migrants, the remaining one-third were locally born. About one-third of the migrants hail from Punjab, Uttar Pradesh comes next, having contributed one-fifth of them. Haryana, Himachal Pradesh and Delhi are other important contributors of migrants. The city has 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh attracted migrants from distant states, such as Bihar, Tamil Nadu, West Bengal and Maharashtra. The number of migrants from Nepal is also considerable. Over one-half of migrants to Chandigarh came from other urban places; the rest had a rural base. An urban origin was more typical of migrants from nearby states, such as Punjab, Haryana, Delhi, and Jammu and Kashmir. Migrants from relatively distant states, such as Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, and Tamil Nadu, mostly had a rural origin. According 1991 census the Pakistan-born displaced persons reduced to about 4% of all in-migrants. In the early sixties, they accounted for nearly 40% of the total population. PHYSICAL FEATURES Location Chandigarh is located in the Northern part of India and bound by two states, Chandigarh has Punjab to its north and west and Haryana to its south and east. Chandigarh lies at 30o 44'N latitude, 76o 53"E longitude. 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh Chandigarh Map 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh ROAD MAP Road Transportation The Union Territory of Chandigarh is well served with by an excellent network of roads. The National Highway 21 ( Ambala – Simla) and 22 ( Chandigarh – Manali) link Chandigarh to rest of the country Buses of seven State Road Corporations connect Chandigarh with many cities and towns of neighboring states. The important cities that are connected by buses with Chandigarh are Delhi, Dehradoon, Simla, Manali, Jammu and major Towns of Punjab and Haryana. 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh National Highway Development Project – Golden Quadrilateral & North South East West Corridors Note: Red Line: North South East West Corridors Blue Line: Golden Quadrilateral 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh Chandigarh Rail Network : Rail Transportation Chandigarh is well connected on the rail network. The main railway routes passing through Haryana are: Kalka-Delhi, Chandigarh-Delhi, Kalka-Amritsar, Kalka-Jodhpur,Kalka-Hawrah,Amritsar-Hawrah, Kalka- Sir Ganganagar (Rajasthan). 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh Chandigarh Air Network: Air Transportation Chandigarh Airport is 12 kms. from City Centre, Indian Airlines and Jet Airways connect Chandigarh with Delhi, Leh and Amritsar. Jet has daily flights Delhi – Chandigarh – Delhi. Indian Airlines has a weekly flight Leh – Chandigarh – Leh. 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh Physical Features The geographical area of the U.T. Chandigarh is 114 sq. km. and another 25.42 sq. km. of the hilly area, which has now been declared as 'Sukhna Wildlife Sanctuary' was acquired for soil conservation works. Chandigarh lies at 280 feet above sea level, with an average altitude of 362m (m.s.l.). The location of Chandigarh is unique as it lies in the foot hill region and is also adjacent to the plains of north India. As such it contains the vegetation of the foot hills and the north Indian plains.Chandigarh has 27 villages in its jurisdiction and two satellite towns, Sahibzada Ajit Singh Nagar, conveniently shortened to SAS Nagar, now Mohali, in the Punjab territory and Panchkula in the Haryana territory. Climate Four seasons are noticeable as (i) the rainy season (late-June to mid-September); (ii) the post monsoon or transition season (mid September to mid-November); (iii) the winter of cold season (mid November to mid-March) and (iv) summer or hot season (mid-March to Mid-June). Southwest monsoons commence in late June and usually continue up to mid-September when there are high intensity showers and the weather is hot and humid. May and June are the hottest months of the year with mean daily maximum temperature being about 40oC and mean daily minimum temperature being about 25oC.January is the coldest month with a mean maximum being around 24oC and a mean minimum being around 1.8oC. Fauna In the small and large water bodies there are about a dozen types of fishes, of which Mahseer , Thail and Rohu are more well known. The common frog is Rana tigrina (Indian Tiger Frog) but the other ones are Indian Rice Frog and Indian Burrowing Frog. Two types of tortoise are found. Three four types of lizards are found in buildings, lawns, hedges, etc. and one of these attracts the attention by its brilliant vermilion colour during mating season. Snakes are of quite a many types as Russels Viper, Cobra, Blind Snake, Indian Python, Sand Cobra, Rat Snake etc. 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh Chandigarh has numerous types and the permanent population of birds, which may consist of over 100 different kinds. There are also migratory birds visiting during winter from as far off a region as Siberia. It is estimated that about 100 to 200 types of birds primarily visit Sukhna Lake. The number of migratory birds varies from year to year. The common mammals are Grey Musk, Shrew Monkey, Langur, Flying Fox, Tickellis Bat, Stripped Squirrel, Indian Rat, Common Rat, House Mouse, Porcupine, Indian Hare, Common Mongoose, Stripped Hyena, Jackal, Indian Fox, Nilgai, Blackbuck and Chital. Flora The flora of Chandigarh area is in fact very rich, existence of 860 species of flowering plants in Chandigarh and its neighborhood. This excludes the ornamentals species whose number is anybody's guess because amongst the residents of Chandigarh and neighboring areas garden culture and love for ornamental herbs and shrubs is fast growing. Chandigarh region is home to number of plant species with Medicinal importance. Areas like Shivalik Reserve Forests, Sukhna Catchment area, Rock Garden, Rose Garden, adjoining villages, are among the various places where different kinds of Medicinal plants and few to endangered species of the same can be found. The most fascinating feature of the City's landscaping is perhaps the Tree Plantation along avenues, open spaces, green belts and around building complexes. The total forest cover in Chandigarh is 32.42 sq. km., which forms 23.5% of the total area. The green spaces like Parks, Gardens, Green belts, Leisure valley and Road avenues etc. are in addition to the forest cover of 23.5 %. Thus the green cover in the city is more than 33 % with 26 types of flowering trees and 33 types of evergreen trees in Chandigarh. 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh DEMOGRAPHIC INDICATORS Unit Year Haryana Himachal Jammu & Madhya Punjab Rajasthan Uttar Delhi Chandi All India Pradesh Kashmir Pardesh Pradesh garh Sq.Km. 1982 44212 55673 222236 443446 50362 342239 294411 1483 114 3287263 Share in India Percent 1982 1.34 1.69 6.76 13.49 1.53 10.41 8.96 0.05 0 100 Population Million 1991 16.46 5.17 7.72 66.18 20.28 44 139.11 9.42 0.64 846.3 Share in India Percent 1991 1.94 0.61 0.91 7.82 2.4 5.2 16.44 1.11 0.08 100 Population Density Per sq.km. 1991 372 93.0 76.0 149.0 403.0 129.0 473.0 6352.0 5632.0 274.0 Avg Annual Growth in Percent 1981-91 2.42 1.89 2.54 2.38 1.89 2.5 2.27 4.15 3.54 2.14 Population (1981-91) Population (Projection) Million 2001 20.1 6.8 10.1 81.2 23.8 54.5 174.3 14.4 0.8 1012.4 Urban Population (Projection) Million 2001 27.5 - - 26.9 31.9 25.4 22.7 - - 28.8 Sex Ratio Females/ 1991 865 976 923 931 882 910 879 827 790 927 1000males Urbanisation Ratio Percent 1991 24.6 8.7 25.5 23.2 29.5 23.0 19.8 90.0 89.7 27.0 Urban Density Per sq.km. 1991 5309 2114 3132 6054 4997 2238 4364 14313 8433 4092 Death Rate Per '000 1996 8.1 8 - 11.1 7.5 8.9 10.2 6.05 4.1 9 Live Birth Rate Per '000 1996 28.2 23 - 32.4 23.5 32.3 34 24.6 16.9 27.5 Work Participation Rate Percent 1991 31 42.83 NA 42.82 30.88 38.87 32.20 31.64 34.94 37.46 Male Percent 1991 48.51 50.64 NA 52.26 54.22 49.30 49.68 51.72 54.34 51.55 Female Percent 1911 10.76 34.81 NA 32.68 4.40 27.40 12.32 7.36 10.39 22.25 Source: PHD Chambers of Commerce. 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh MACRO ECONOMIC INDICATORS Unit Year Haryana Himachal Jammu & Madhya Punjab Rajasthan Uttar Delhi All India Pradesh Kashmir Pardesh Pradesh Net State Domestic Product (NSDP) at Factor Cost*: - At current prices Rs. Million 1998-89 383990 49310 58120 610187.8 342900 **586500 1527260 365040 8755940 - At 1980-81 prices Rs. Million 1997-98 75450 $14,190 #17540 147480 101420 @116480 273650 *75740 323820 - At 1993-94 prices Rs. Million 1998-99 254090 NA NA NA NA **379720 971390 251650 NA NSDP Growth 1980-81 prices Percent 1997-98 1.1 NA NA 3.1 2 @0.4 2.2 3.3 87.3 Gross State Domestric Product Rs. Million 1997-98 374270 65040 72930 708320 503580 678050 1299770 445100 NA Per Capita Income at 1993-94 Rs. 1998-99 13084 8864 6658 7350 15504 7694 5890 19091 9739 Prices* 2.00 Sectoral Shares: - Agriculture Percent 1997-98 39 27.6 43 41.4 44 **34.2 37 1 31 - Industry Percent 1997-98 21 32.3 8 26.3 15 **24.088 20 83 28 - Services Percent 1997-98 40 40.1 49 32.3 41 **41.72 43 16 41 Sectoral Growth Rates: - Agriculture Percent 1995-96 -6 9 4 -2 0 -6 2 -40 -1 - Forestry & Logging Percent 1995-96 7 10 5 -12 1 2 -25 - -1 - Fishing Percent 1995-96 16 10 14 15 8 -12 6 3 5 - Mining & Quarrying Percent 1995-96 1 14 10 5 16 -18 1 -58 7 - Manufacturing Percent 1995-96 9 13 3 11 10 6 4 13 14 Per Capita Consumption Rs. 1995 5127 4347 7080 3442 5750 4503 3852 NA NA Expenditure * Note: Owing 10 differences in source material used, figures for different States are not strictly comparable. $: 1995-96 #: 1996-97 @: 1998-99 **: 1999-2000 Source: PHD Chambers of Commerce. 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh MINIMUM MONTHLY WAGES OF WORKMEN Haryana Himachal Jammu & Madhya Punjab Rajasthan Uttar Delhi Pradesh Kashmir Pardesh Pradesh Chandigarh With effect from Jul-00 Jan-99 Mar-93 Mar-00 Nov.99 Feb-00 Jan-96 UNSKILLED 1914.86 1530 NA 825 1796.5 1560 1920 2419 1350 SEMI UNSKILLED A 1964.86 1695 NA 928 1941.55 928 2220 2585 1495 SEMI UNSKILLED B 1989.86 NA NA NA 1875.45 NA NA NA NA SKILLED A 2039.86 1950 NA 1032 2104.55 1032 2660 2843 1657 SKILLED B 2064.86 NA NA NA 1983.45 NA NA NA NA HIGHLY SKILLED 2114.86 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES SCENARIO Recognised Educational Institutions in Northern Region (1998 - 99) State University Professional Colleges for High Middle / Sr.Basic Primary/Jr. * Education general Education School/Jr. School Basic College School HARYANA 5.00 45.00 169.00 3785.00 1788.00 10269.00 HIMACHAL PRADESH 3.00 6.00 557.00 1525.00 1189.00 7732.00 JAMMU & KASHMIR 3.00 12.00 38.00 1351.00 3104.00 10483.00 MADHYA PRADESH 17.00 70.00 413.00 8341.00 21108.00 86858.00 PUNJAB 5.00 64.00 193.00 3325.00 2527.00 12633.00 RAJASTHAN 10.00 70.00 267.00 5633.00 14807.00 35077.00 UTTAR PRADESH 28.00 174.00 676.00 8339.00 20675.00 94476.00 DELHI 11.00 24.00 64.00 1459.00 601.00 2676.00 CHANDIGARH 2.00 7.00 12.00 107.00 34.00 48.00 NORTHERN REGION 84.00 472.00 2389.00 33865.00 65833.00 260252.00 % TO ALL INDIA 35.44 22.17 31.88 30.12 34.62 41.52 INDIA 237.00 2129.00 7494.00 112438.00 190166.00 626737.00 * Includes Deemed Universities and Institutes off National Importance Source: PHD Chambers of Commerce. 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh WATER SUPPLY Items Unit Period 1990-91 1998-99 1999-2K 2000 - 01 1 2 3 4 5 6 No. of Water Works Nos. NA 5 5 5 (Cums.) No. of Metered Connection Nos. 74892 82184 84294 120000 No. of Un-metered Nos. 9360 23464 23656 20241 Connection WATER CONSUMPTION (A) Domestic Kiloliters 67933 5227262 5334897 5943761 (B) Commercial / Industrial Kiloliters 7992 1833205 1881295 4940444 Per Capita Consumption Kiloliters 97 70 67 95 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh POWER Items Unit Period 1990-91 1998-99 1999-2K 2000 - 01 1 2 3 4 5 6 Electricity Consumed Lakh KWH 5240.80 8401.89 8491.04 8715.36 Per capita Consumption KWH 816 988 964 955 Agricultural Consumption Lakh KWH 12.71 25.58 26.59 23.02 Industrial Consumption Lakh KWH 2005.16 1792.34 1865.46 1916.35 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh POPULATION DATA 2001 - CENSUS (P) Population Total Rural Urban Population as per 2001 Persons 900914 92118 808796 Census Males 508224 56837 451387 Females 392690 35281 357409 Decennial Population Growth Absolute 258899 25932 232967 1991 - 2001 %age +40.33 +39.18 +40.46 Density of Population Sex PerSq.Kms 7903 2658 10194 Ratio No.of females per 1000 773 621 792 Males Population of 0-6 years* (I) Absolute 109293 14007 95286 Persons Males 59238 7562 51676 Females 50055 6445 43610 (II) Percentage of Total 12.13 15.21 11.78 Population Persons Males 11.66 13.30 11.45 Females 12.75 18.27 12.20 Literacy : (I) Absolute 647208 59547 587661 Persons Males 384563 40178 344385 Females 262645 19369 243276 (II) Literacy Rate 81.76 76.23 82.36 Persons Males 85.65 81.54 86.16 Females 76.65 67.17 77.53 * 6 years means completed 6 years as on 01.03.2001 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh Chandigarh Corporates Name of the Organisation State Amrit Banaspati Co. Ltd. Chandigarh Bank of Punjab Limited Chandigarh Bhushan Industires Limited Chandigarh Bhushan Steel & Strips Ltd Chandigarh Chandigarh Distillers & Bottlers Ltd. Chandigarh Chandigarh Industrial & Tourism Development Corporation Chandigarh Control & Switch Gear Company Ltd. Chandigarh Dhillon Kool Drinks & Beverages Chandigarh Golden Laminates Limited Chandigarh Gorz-Beckert Asia Ltd Chandigarh Guru Nanak Paper Mills Ltd. Chandigarh IPF - Vikram India Ltd. Chandigarh Indian Acrylics Limited Chandigarh Indo - Swift Limited Chandigarh Industrial Cables India Limited Chandigarh JC Coach Builders Limited Chandigarh Kamla Dials & Devices Ltd. Chandigarh Khandelia Oil & General Limited Chandigarh Metro Expoters Limited Chandigarh Modern Steel Limited Chandigarh Mohan Meaken Limited Mohangram (Chandigarh) Munak Chemicals Limited Chandigarh PCP International Ltd. Chandigarh Punjab Alkalies & Chemicals Ltd Chandigarh Punjab Chemicals & Pharmaceuticals Ltd Chandigarh Punjab State Civil Supplies Corpn. Ltd Chandigarh The Punjab State Co-oop Milk Producer's Federations Ltd Chandigarh Rana Polycot Limited Chandigarh Shivalik Agro Poly Product Limited Chandigarh Singhania & Co. Chandigarh Surya Medicare Limited Chandigarh Variendera Agro Chemicals Limited Chandigarh Winsome Textiles Industries Ltd Chandigarh POPULATION DATA 2001 - CENSUS (P) Population Total Rural Urban Population as per 2001 900914 92118 808796 Census Persons Males 508224 56837 451387 Females 392690 35281 357409 Decennial Population 258899 25932 232967 Growth 1991 - 2001 Absolute %age +40.33 +39.18 +40.46 Density of Population PerSq.Kms 7903 2658 10194 Sex Ratio No.of females 773 621 792 per 1000 Males Population of 0-6 years* (I) Absolute 109293 14007 95286 Persons Males 59238 7562 51676 Females 50055 6445 43610 (II) Percentage of 12.13 15.21 11.78 Total Population Persons Males 11.66 13.30 11.45 Females 12.75 18.27 12.20 Literacy : (I) Absolute 647208 59547 587661 Persons Males 384563 40178 344385 Females 262645 19369 243276 (II) Literacy Rate 81.76 76.23 82.36 Persons Males 85.65 81.54 86.16 Females 76.65 67.17 77.53 * 6 years means completed 6 years as on 01.03.2001 Name of the Organisation State Amrit Banaspati Co. Ltd. Chandigarh Bank of Punjab Limited Chandigarh Bhushan Industires Limited Chandigarh Bhushan Steel & Strips Ltd Chandigarh Chandigarh Distillers & Bottlers Ltd. Chandigarh Chandigarh Industrial & Tourism Development Corporation Chandigarh Control & Switch Gear Company Ltd. Chandigarh Dhillon Kool Drinks & Beverages Chandigarh Golden Laminates Limited Chandigarh Gorz-Beckert Asia Ltd Chandigarh Guru Nanak Paper Mills Ltd. Chandigarh IPF - Vikram India Ltd. Chandigarh Indian Acrylics Limited Chandigarh Indo - Swift Limited Chandigarh Industrial Cables India Limited Chandigarh JC Coach Builders Limited Chandigarh Kamla Dials & Devices Ltd. Chandigarh Khandelia Oil & General Limited Chandigarh Metro Expoters Limited Chandigarh Modern Steel Limited Chandigarh Mohan Meaken Limited Mohangram (Chandigarh) Munak Chemicals Limited Chandigarh PCP International Ltd. Chandigarh Punjab Alkalies & Chemicals Ltd Chandigarh Punjab Chemicals & Pharmaceuticals Ltd Chandigarh Punjab State Civil Supplies Corpn. Ltd Chandigarh The Punjab State Co-oop Milk Producer's Federations Ltd Chandigarh Rana Polycot Limited Chandigarh Shivalik Agro Poly Product Limited Chandigarh Singhania & Co. Chandigarh Surya Medicare Limited Chandigarh Variendera Agro Chemicals Limited Chandigarh Winsome Textiles Industries Ltd Chandigarh 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh Chandigarh Tourism Policy Chandigarh Tourism has declared the following vision “ Tourism as a major industry in Chandigarh is to be developed by Providing leadership, organizational and strategic direction, Improving the quality of tourism products, Developing places of tourist interest, Providing necessary facilities for all categories of tourist and Marketing Chandigarh’s Tourism products internationally and domestically So as to provide employment and economic, environmental, social and cultural benefits to the citizens of the city beautiful – Chandigarh” In the new economic scenario, Chandigarh Tourism has recognized the need to involve the private sector in the development of tourism infrastructure in conjunction with the Government. The following activities are included in the ‘Tourism Industry’ Accommodation facilities Restaurants and fast food facilities Transportation facilities Tourist entertainment Souvenirs With this background, the objectives have developed as 1. Employment generation. Tourism generates both direct and indirect employment 2. Attract private investment 3. Preserve heritage and tradition. As Chandigarh is a new city, the traditions are related with gardens and festivals 4. Preserve the environment 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh 5. Diversification of the Tourism product into adventure sports, entertainment, leisure etc. 6. To provide adequate publicity both domestic and international 7. Create accommodation facilities – renovate and upgrade existing facilities 8. Develop human resources for Hospitality and Tourism. The following strategic projects have been suggested to implement these objectives 1. Develop Chandigarh as a convention city – attract the MICE segment 2. Eco- tourism wildlife park around the Sukhna Bird sanctuary 3. Sound & Light show at the Rock Garden 4. Further development of Tourist amenities at Sukhna Lake 5. Amusement park 6. Translites and signeages for the convenience of tourists 7. Tourist information center to house other State Tourism offices as well as railways, airlines and trade associations 8. Promotion of Rail Tourism – in particular on the Kalka-Shimla line 9. Promotion of Kalagram as a showcase for the Northern States 10. Development of innovative tourism packages o Buddhist places o Pilgrimages - Hindu and Sikh o Holiday packages to Hill stations o Heritage packages o Adventure packages o NRI packages 11. Promotion of off-season tourism 12. Special Tourism packages for NRIs 13. Development of Chandigarh as a Film City 14. Integrate the police to safeguard the interests of tourists 15. Promotion of week end golf packages 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh Another major initiative has been an attempt to integrate Tourism Development in the Northern States of Punjab, Haryana, Himachal Pradesh and Jammu & Kashmir via a ‘Tourism Advisory Board’. The Board would have the Tourism Secretaries of the participating states as members, the Chairmanship rotating between the States. The Board would also have prominent persons from the Tourism industry as members. The primary role is seen as Working out a strategy for integrated approach for promotion of tourism in the region Promotion of interstate Tourism via programmes such as Tourism Trade fairs & Exhibitions Setting up joint information centers Organising interstate package tours Collaboration on Tourism promotion schemes Joint participation in Traevl Industry Trade fairs Joint cultural festivals Linkages of websites Part of this initiative would be to declare a Special Tourism Area for a radius of 100 Km around Chandigarh with the prime objective of allowing the free movement of designated tourism vehicles. 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh FAIRS & FESTIVALS Chandigarh citizens celebrate several festivals that are uniquely their own. The Festival of Gardens This is a three-day extravaganza organized in the last week of February; included on the national calendar of festivals. Initially called the Rose Festival it intended to encourage people to stroll through the Rose Garden and enjoy the sight of the blooms. Each year the festival grew: now it includes performances of music and dance, both classical and folk, flower shows, events for children, exhibitions by local artists, photographers and craftsman and a wide range of amusements. Since 1997 it is known as the Festival of Gardens. The city pulls out all the stops for this celebration, reminiscent of ancient India's Vasant Utsav in honor of spring. April Fools' Day (April 1) On this day poets from all over the country gather at Chandigarh to recite verses in a jocular vein. Even those who do not ordinarily enjoy poetry look forward to the Maha Moorkh Sammelan, or Conclave of Colossal Fools. No other city in India hosts such a gathering. Baisakhi Baisakhi is the first day of the new year in the traditional Vikrami calendar, it celebrates the wheat harvest, and it is one of the high points of the year for Sikhs as it is anniversary of the founding of Khalsa. As the capital of two basically agrarian states, Punjab and Haryana, this day sees festivities organized by both the state governments as well as the Administration of the UT, and of course many institutions in the city. 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh The Mango festival This festival is held in June. Mango-growers from all over India are invited to enter their prize fruits in the various competitions. Visitors to the fair can see and taste all the traditional varieties of the fruit as well as the latest hybrids from the agricultural universities. It is also an occasion for agro-industries, and food industries processing mango into jams, pickles and canned fruit to display their wares. TEEJ Teej is a traditional holiday celebrated by women in the middle of the monsoon season-generally around the first week of August. The Rock Garden with its swings and pavilions is the festival venue and the day is basically a grand picnic with songs and dances, purchase of new bangles, painting the hands with mehndi. The Indo-Pak Mushaira This gathering in December brings together poets from India and Pakistan. The significance of this event is felt especially by the older generation whose memories go back to the years before the partition of India. For the younger generation it brings home the deep commonalties of language and culture that unite the people of two nations. The Chrysanthemum Show - in December turns the Terraces Flower Garden in the city's Sector 33 into a multi-coloured wall-to-wall carpet of chrysanthemums. Hundreds of varieties of the flower are on display and city gardeners vie for coveted honours in the competitions. The Plaza Carnival 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh This Carnival is on every-Saturday-night is held on an open-air stage set up in Sector 17's central piazza. The weekly three-hour programme draws a large crowd and provides an opportunity for talented local singers, dancers, magicians, comedians, actors and acrobats to do their stuff. The Chandigarh Carnival This carnival is a three-day event celebrated in the second week of November shortly before or after Nehru's birth anniversary on November 14,otherwise known as Children's Day. The carnival opens with a colourful procession, which everyone is encouraged to join. The carnival is a time for students to show their talent (or simply have fun) and elders too participate in a number of competitions and exhibits. 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh Roles of relevant bodies in Tourism The main bodies that generate and cater to leisure and business travel to the State are 1. CITCO – Chandigarh Industrial & Tourism Corporation 2. Urban Development and Town Planning Chandigarh Tourism. The Chandigarh Industrial & Tourism Development Corporation Limited (CITCO) was set up in 1974 for construction and allotment of industrial sheds and for supply of iron & steel to the industries in Chandigarh. Its original name was Chandigarh Small Industries and Development Corporation Limited (CSIDC). The Chandigarh Administration transferred Hotel Mountview and other cafeterias to the Corporation in 1982. It's name was first changed to Chandigarh Industrial & General Development Corporation Limited (CIGDC) and finally to Chandigarh Industrial & Tourism Development Corporation Limited (CITCO). In terms of Tourism responsibilities, Chandigarh Tourism plays both developmental and operational roles. Its prime areas of responsibility are 1. Promotion of Chandigarh and its attractions as destinations 2. Creation of tourism related infrastructure 3. Development of accommodation and restaurants 4. Activities pertaining to the preservation of art, culture, history and heritage of the State 5. Establishment of recreation and leisure facilities 6. Tourism related human resource development 7. Promotion of package tours 8. Information and signage 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh Chandigarh Tourism is a profitable venture. A short overview of its performance over various activities is given below Unit Hotel Mountview 1997-98 Rs. - Lacs Sale Profit 824.55 215.71 1998-99 Rs. - Lacs Sale Profit 891.57 266.84 1999-00 Rs. - Lacs Sale Profit 1093.08 323.97 Hotel Shivalikview Hotel Parkview Chef Lakeview 677.08 127.68 111.28 145.49 9.98 16.04 651.46 121.22 117.20 81.74 -47.61 12.43 673.31 124.21 160.69 91.11 -4.60 39.98 Chef Bus Stand Rock Garden Canteen Canteens Tours & Travels 41.56 5.44 9.50 10.47 -14.55 -3.00 -18.59 -15.48 38.50 6.61 17.41 9.80 -10.07 0.14 -23.02 -15.24 36.89 1.24 16.88 7.96 -10.84 -0.54 -23.03 -13.54 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh URBAN PLANNING The Department is headed by the Chief Architect who is the Ex-officio Secretary, Urban Planning. The Department consists of two wings. Architectural Wing Town planning Wing Architectural Wing This wing has five basic duties: • To design buildings for the Chandigarh Administration and work entrusted to it by various departments of the Central and State governments and autonomous bodies • To Co-ordinate with the various wings of the Engineering Department both in the planning and construction phases and to incorporate structural designs and other engineering services into the buildings. • Architectural supervision during the course of construction of works designed by the deptt. • To scrutinize building plans submitted to the Estate Office for approval of the Administration and to inspect commercial buildings for issuance of completion certificates by the Estate Office. The Chief Architect's jurisdiction encompasses the entire Union Territory. Town Planning Unit The Town Planning Unit consist of Senior Town Planner with supporting team of Divisional Town Planner, asstt, Town Planners and other draftsmen in different grades. The Senior Town Planner is responsible for implementing the Chandigarh Master Plan proposals. He prepares project reports dealing with different aspects of the development of the city and its surrounding area. He plans 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh Industrial Development As this, along with Chandigarh Tourism, is part of CITCO, there is complete coordination within their roles and no overlaps. The Corporation was set-up in 1974 primarily for supplying raw-material to the small scale industries and for construction and allotment of industrial sheds. Some more activities were added subsequently. The details of the industrial activities in chronological order are as under: Year Activity 1974 Construction and allotment of industrial sheds. Supply of iron and steel to the SSI Units. 1978 Industrial Development and Facility Centre ( IDFC ). This Centre was setup with the assistance of Industries Department . 1979 Emporium as marketing outlet for the products of SSI units. 1992 Supply of Petroleum products- Agents for IPCL (Indian Petro Chemical Limited) 2000 Consignment Agency of Steel Authority of India Limited (SAIL) 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh the Phase-II and II sectors and the left out pockets of Phase I and II with the aim of bring areas under intensive utilization. HE scrutinizes building plans and cases concerning construction in areas falling under the Periphery Control Act. He studies Urban trends, which will require plan revisions and plans for changing traffic and transportation needs. Rehabilitation and resettlement of squatters settlements and other rehabilitation housing projects come under his purview and he also outlines the statutory zoning plans in respect of land for commercial/residential/cultural/educational purposes. In accordance with the Estate Officer, the Senior Town Planner releases land for auction and sets plinth levels. He provides guidance to the Chandigarh Housing Board and prepares plan for the development schemes of Manimajra. He is involved in planning for the integrated development of the Chandigarh Inter-State Region. The Senior Town Plan's jurisdiction encompasses the entire area of the Union Territory of Chandigarh. 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh Activities of contiguous states UTTAR PRADESH After the formation of separate hill state of Uttaranchal, UP doesn’t account for any breath taking topography as is associated with Uttranchal. Its most important physical feature is the River Ganges, which traverses the length of the state and accounts for some of the oldest cities/ regions of the world. Rivers are a significant physical feature and tourism resource. All important tourist destinations of UP have an attractive riverfront that can be developed. UP Government is concentrating on improving river-based experience by way of improving ghats, improving the experience at the ghats, encouraging water sports, river cruise, Better destination management at key tourism centers by way of urban decongestion, traffic management, ghats and river experience improvement and better accommodation facilities at Varanasi ,Allahabad and Agra. Product Innovation and better packaging of existing products a. The Bundelkhand area has a rich inventory of heritage properties. Lack of connectivity, infrastructure and communication facilities makes it difficult to create a tourism experience. Plans are to start a tourism train to provide connectivity, accommodation and basic infrastructure in a single product. It also provides a “theme” that is attractive and marketable. b. Agra as an International convention and events center. Plans to set up a international size convention facility. Agra has the advantage of instant international positive name recognition. It is well connected with Delhi gateway. Agra has numerous monuments besides Taj Mahal and numerous possible excursions extensions. Agra has ample accommodation in different ranges. 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh UTTRANCHAL Tourism has been identified to have the potential to become the main stay of Uttranchal’s economy, and needs to be developed in planned and time bound manner. To achieve this objective the state has taken following steps The state has constituted a high-level Tourism Development Board, which will replace the existing tourism directorate. The role of the board will be a. Formation of a policy and strategy for development of tourism in Uttranchal b. Preparation of plans and guidelines for developing and strengthening tourism related infrastructure in the state c. Establish standards/norms for and forming policy guidelines for various tourism activities d. Strategy for mobilizing private sector participation and investments in the private sector. e. Single window Information and assistance center. Outsourcing Expertise The Uttranchal tourism board empanelled more than hundred experts/ agencies to seek services of specialists and consultancy agencies. The board identified seven projects and awarded the work to different agencies. These projects are master plans, which dovetail all developments and have a long-term perspective for sustainable tourism products. Destination Management The existing tourism centers need destination management plans to maintain and improve their effectiveness. Haridwar, Mussoorie, Nainital and Rishikesh being the key hubs through which pass the maximum number of tourists in the region would require immediate attention. 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh Plans need to be made for better connectivity, city decongestion, improvements of accommodation etc. The master plan is being prepared for the Char Dham route, and same might be planned for other important destinations mentioned above. New Destinations New tourism destinations have been identified which will develop and marketed as spokes to hubs. These new destinations will also help in decongesting the hubs. Private Sector Participation The areas and opportunities have been identified for the private sector which are development of accommodation facilities for different categories of tourists, tourist resorts, specialized food restaurants, facilities for adventure sports, amusement parks etc. To make these investment opportunities attractive special incentives and concessions have been planned. 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh RAJASTHAN Tourism is a significant contributor to the economy to Rajasthan economy. Rajasthan has adopted the mission approach for tourism sector to accord very high priority and ensure planned and time bound growth and development of tourism industry in the state to make it a truly “people’s industry” in Rajasthan. a. Rajasthan has estimated tourist accommodation of 19000 rooms in 772 hotels and as per assessment of the state tourism department, 20000 additional rooms will be required by year 2005.The state has decided to encourage more private investment. The state will encourage private investment in developing ancient buildings and heritage properties as tourist resorts; this will have dual advantage of preservation of heritage properties and additional accommodation. b. Traditionally Rajasthan has been depending on it heritage to attract tourists. Rajasthan Government is looking at ways and means of enhancing the tourist products. o The State has rich forest reserves and national parks like Sariska, Bharatpur- Ghana and Rathambore. Other areas, which have the potential for Wildlife, will be promoted. o Rajasthan has rich and varied heritage of handicrafts, handlooms and other products, which are appreciated by and purchased by tourists visiting the State. Efforts will be made to improve direct access of tourists to artisans. RTDC will develop shopping arcades in their existing properties and provide space to artisans to display and market their products. Efforts will be made to set up Shilpgrams and a Handicrafts Museum. o Experience has shown that Fairs and festivals have great tourist appeal and promotional value. Some of the fairs and festivals have become internationally popular like the Pushkar and Dessert Festival, 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh Jaisalmer. The Government proposes to consolidate the facilities at such places to make these fairs and festivals more attractive. c. Destination Management o In view of possible exploitation of tourists, Government of may enact a suitable legislation for regulating tourism trade. o The Department of tourism will be empowered to license and inspect such establishments as are engaged in providing services of to tourists. Since there is an existing procedure for classification of Hotels, such establishments will not be brought under the purview of the legislation to avoid duplication of regulatory procedures. o Complaints received through tourists may be readdressed through Tourist Assistance Force. o Care will be taken to avoid unrestricted entry of tourists beyond the carrying capacity of National Parks and Sanctuaries. DELHI Delhi has a rich inventory of heritage properties. Delhi is one of the two major gateways to the country. Delhi has done very little to promote tourism in the state. This tourist has to come to Delhi for visiting all the popular tourist destinations in North India. Delhi is planning to set up 6/8 more Delhi Hatt type of facilities in different parts of Delhi. Efforts are being made to rejuvenate Tuglakabad Fort area. PUNJAB Punjab has done very limited to promote tourism in the state. It has limited heritage assets and the same have been neglected. The Golden Temple or Darbar Sahib is the most frequented pilgrimage center of the state. The Patiala Fort houses the National Sports Academy.Lately the Sheesh Mahal has been used as a backdrop to organize music concerts and contests and the area around the property has been improved. 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh CHANDIGARH HOTELS HOTEL SECTOR AMAR 22 A ALANKAR 22 A AROMA 22 C CHANDIGARH 22 C CLASSIC 35 C DIVYADEEP 22 B G.K. INTERNATIONAL 35 C HERITAGE 35 C HIMANI'S 35 C JASMINE 35 C JAMES PLAZA 17 JULLUNDHAR 22 B KAPIL 35 B KC RESIDENCY 35 D KWALITY RESIDENCY 22 A Le CROWN 35 B MAYA PALACE 35 B METRO 35 35 C MONARCH 35 B MOUNTVIEW 10 B PANKAJ 22 A PARK INN 35 PICCADILY 22 B REGENCY 35 B RIKHI 35 B SAMRAT 22 D SHIVALIK VIEW 17 D SOUTHEND 35 C SUNBEAM 22 B CHANDIGARH YATRI 24 B NIWAS PRESIDENT 26 C SOLITAIRE NAC Shivalik Enclave PANCHKULA HOTELS North Park Panchkula - Shimla Road Prabhat Inn *** Panchkula - Shimla Road Oscar Regency Panchkula - Shimla Road Vikrant Panchkula - Shimla Road ZIRAKPUR HOTELS Mark Royal (10 Kms from Panchkula) Bristol (10 Kms from Panchkula) Shagun (10 Kms from Panchkula) Grow Green (10 Kms from Panchkula) NO OF ROOMS 16 12 30 16 14 14 28 14 17 14 N/A 16 13 26 14 16 26 16 14 156 14 26 48 25 16 16 13 57 20 26 30 20 12 50 30+ Info. Not avail. 12 (approx) 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh State Luxury tax on room Qualifying rate -Rs Actual/ Published Sales tax on Food Sales Tax on softbeverages Sales tax on Liquor Annual Bar licence -Rslakhs Excise onconsumption- BeerRs Excise onconsumption-liquorRs Electricity / unit Elcetricity demandMonthperKVA/ 10 for Andhra Pradesh 5% 300 pub 8% 8% 8% hotel nil nil 4.61 108 Assam 20% all pub 7% nil nil 0.5 1.95+75% 3.75+75% 3.70+ 5% 70 Arunachal nil nil nil nil nil nil 0.5 nil nil 2.15 Bihar 7% 151 act 6+1% 11+1% 25+2% 3 1 6.75 2.92 125 Delhi 10% 500 act 8% 10% 20% 4.5 to 7.5 5.25 to 7.0 Goa 15% 500 pub 15% 20% on foreign 0.6 2.90 to 3.30 110 Gujarat 20% 500 act 12% 0.2 3.5 +45% Haryana nil nil NA 10% 20% 20% 5.75 4.02 Himachal Pradesh 10% 150 pub 8% 33% on out of state 0.7 2.8 Jammu & Kashmir 2% 8% 32% 1 3.18 Karnataka 15% 1,000 pub 10% 10% Indian 10% Foreign 60% 2.08 6.2 Kerala 15% 500 act 9% Local 5% imported 13 2 100% Madhya Pradesh 10% all act 9% 10% nil 2 3.63 122 Maharashtra 10% 1,200 act 20% 20% 20% 1.18 to 3.71 2.64 Orissa nil nil nil 8% Indian nil imported 20% 1.5 3.45 Punjab nil nil nil 9% nil nil 1.2 7.95 88 3.39 120 Indian nil imported Rajasthan 8% 1,200 act 14% 50.6% 1.5 to 6.0 11 31 3.72 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh State Luxury tax on room Qualifying rate -Rs Actual/ Published Sales tax on Food beverages Sales Tax on soft Sales tax on Liquor - Rs lakhs Annual Bar licence Beer - on Rs consumption Excise liquor - on Rs consumption Excise Electricity / unit per KVA/ Month Elcetricity demand Sikkim nil nil nil 8% nil nil 0.06 2.5 Tamil Nadu 20% all Pub 8% 2.2 4 Uttaranchal 5% Uttar Pradesh 5% 1,000 act 8% out of state 32.6% 8 per hotel 8 48 4.13 West Bengal 10% a/c act 17% imported 30% daily 1 to 25 30 to 175 4.88 Chandigarh nil Source : FHRAI 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh Transport taxes Token tax/ qtr Tax perseat/km Tax per day Tax per month Tax per week Total permonth All IndiaTouristPermitpermonth Delhi 35 seat coach 1675 560 1600 Ambassador 850 285 Esteem 1300 433 Haryana 35 seat coach a/c 8.53 4000 35 seat coach non a/c 8.31 Ambassador/ Esteem 875 291 Qualis- 9 seats 3175 1058 Punjab 35 seat coach 3175 nil Ambassador/ Esteem 800 267 Qualis- 9 seats 1000 333 UP & Uttaranchal 35 seat coach 14500 485 4835 Ambassador/ Esteem 730 243 Qualis- 9 seats 4350 1450 Gujarat 35 seat coach 9000 36000 Rajasthan 35 seat coach 20610 20610 2025 Ambassador 1000 1000 Qualis- 9 seats 3400 3400 Himachal Pradesh 35 seat coach 12000 4000 4000 Ambassador/ Esteem 386 130 Qualis- 9 seats 3250 1085 Madhya Pradesh 35 seater coach 3400 21600 Qualis/ Ambasador 210 Source : All India Transporters Association/ PHD Chamber of Commerce Employment in Hotels & restaurants Own Account Ent Establishments Total Number Employed Number Employed Number Employed Andhra Pradesh 69979 131,082 26504 134,009 96483 265,091 Arunachal 446 823 1029 4,740 1475 5,563 Assam 12005 18,186 14713 56,020 26718 74,206 Bihar 39822 62,201 21599 81,870 61421 144,071 Delhi 10917 14,822 10642 65,402 21559 80,224 Goa 1740 2,578 1189 9,331 2929 11,909 Gujarat 14759 22,622 12945 66,042 27704 88,664 Haryana 11971 15,360 5426 18,682 17397 34,342 Himachal Pradesh 7931 9,937 3214 11,651 11145 21,585 Jammu & Kashmir Karnataka 60093 103,972 34429 160,522 94522 264,494 Kerala 71472 101,290 27483 103,657 98955 204,947 Madhya Pradesh 39248 57,836 24412 96,007 63660 153,843 Maharashtra 47828 73,828 52237 312,763 100065 386,591 Manipur 2174 4,400 794 3,169 2968 7,569 Meghalaya 2222 4,430 3100 11,767 5322 16,197 Mizoram 1010 1,635 619 1,706 1629 3,341 Nagaland 589 1,301 949 4,179 1538 5,480 Orissa 34811 60,779 18007 68,292 52818 129,071 Punjab 10006 13,503 6694 23,984 16700 37,487 Rajasthan 29426 38,606 14820 50,224 44246 88,830 Sikkim 261 593 398 1,809 659 2,402 Tamil Nadu 85563 139,566 36637 167,673 122200 307,239 Uttar Pradesh 73911 103,649 28760 102,230 102671 205,879 West Bengal 68179 92,019 26508 115,903 94687 207,922 Andaman & Nicobar Chandigarh Daman & Diu Dadra & Nagar Haveli Lakshwadeep Pondicherry Source : department of Tourism Transport taxes Token tax/qtr Tax perseat/km Tax per day Tax permonth Tax per week Total permonth All IndiaTouristPermitpermonth Delhi 35 seat coach 1675 560 1600 Ambassador 850 285 Esteem 1300 433 Haryana 35 seat coach a/c 8.53 4000 35 seat coach non a/c 8.31 Ambassador/ Esteem 875 291 Qualis- 9 seats 3175 1058 Punjab 35 seat coach 3175 nil Ambassador/ Esteem 800 267 Qualis- 9 seats 1000 333 UP & Uttaranchal 35 seat coach 14500 485 4835 Ambassador/ Esteem 730 243 Qualis- 9 seats 4350 1450 Gujarat 35 seat coach 9000 36000 Rajasthan 35 seat coach 20610 20610 2025 Ambassador 1000 1000 Qualis- 9 seats 3400 3400 Himachal Pradesh 35 seat coach 12000 4000 4000 Ambassador/ Esteem 386 130 Qualis- 9 seats 3250 1085 Madhya Pradesh 35 seater coach 3400 21600 Qualis/ Ambasador 210 Source : All India Transporters Association/ PHD Chamber of Commerce 20 year Perspective Tourism Master Plan for Chandigarh Approach to Assessment of Attractions Successful tourism products are those developed to meet the demands of existing and potential markets. These market segments have also been analysed. While analyzing the attractions of Chandigarh, we kept in mind both Chandigarh Tourism Policy and the National Tourism Policy. The approach has been 1. Identification of market segments 2. Listing of all attractions in Chandigarh 3. Mapping the relationship between Chandigarh Tourism and National Tourism Policies 4. Study of “Best Practice” in other City States 5. From the above, a shortlisting of projects. 1 Fitness Trail High Court The Open Hand/ Dove – symbol of Chandigarh Rock Garden scuplture Marketing State Tourism Three case studies are attached – Kerala, Rajasthan and Uttaranchal – representing “Best Practice” in the Indian context. Recently, Maharashtra has been very active in promotion. Some pertinent observations are 1. Get the basics in place. In other words set the right conditions for enhancing infrastructure for tourism. Some specific actions taken a. Common approach by all Govt.Departments. Rajasthan’s Rajiv Gandhi Mission and Uttaranchal’s Tourism Development Board ensure that various Govt.Depts and private sector are involved in Tourism plans b. Giving Tourism Industry status. Kerala did this in 1986, Rajasthan in 1989 c. Outsource expertise. Uttaranchal and Rajasthan both utilize professionals for surveys and feasibility studies d. Involve Private sector. Kerala Tourism formed JVs with two major hotel chains to attract investments. It has further set up a Tourism Investment Agency. Rajasthan offered further assistance to develop Heritage hotels. Uttaranchal has earmarked accommodation, restaurants, adventure sports, amusement parks for private development. e. Develop Human resources. Rajasthan and Uttaranchal are encouraging private sector to set up Hotel management and Food craft institutes. There is emphasis on guide training and certification. Uttaranchal plans specialist training facilities for adventure sports. Kerala set up an Institute of Tourism & Travel Studies in 1988 in addition to the IHMCT in Kovalam. f. Emphasis on civic infrastructure. Identified by Uttaranchal as a key area. 2. Enhance the Tourism product. Apart from traditional reasons for visits a. Kerala – Ayurveda and Traditional festivals like Boat races, Elephant March, Nishagandhi Dance festival. Also developing a new Hill Station b. Rajasthan – Direct access to Handicrafts and Handloom artisans, Fairs and festivals, Wildlife. c. Uttaranchal – Adventure sports 3. Concentrate on a few destinations/ activities a. Kerala – Ayurveda, Calicut-Kasargod, Quilon-Alleppey b. Uttaranchal – four hubs of Haridwar, Mussoorie, Nainital and Rishikesh. Adventure sports c. Goa – holidays d. Rajasthan - Heritage 4. Manage Destinations. Involve host population – Rajasthan positions this as a ‘peoples industry’, better connectivity, city decongestion, Safety & Security of tourists – Kerala thinking of an insurance scheme, restricting entry into sensitive areas like National Parks, Registration of establishments catering to tourist needs 5. Product Positioning. Each State needs to develop a USP. a. Kerala – God’s own Country b. Uttaranchal – Every season is the reason c. Goa – 365 days on holiday 6. Promotion to target markets. a. Market segmentation – Relevant market segments, both domestic and international, should be identified geographically and by reason for visit. Eg. Kerala also targets NRIs b. Distribution – Ability to reserve hotels/ tours in source markets c. Sales - Participation in domestic and International trade fairs, familiarization trips for identified agents, sales offices in key markets d. Communications - Focused advertising in trade and travel related media, PR, Interactive websites, e-mail magazines, sweepstake prizes for high profile contests, familiarization trips for identified journalists i. Kerala has hired an agency in the US e. Database maintenance f. Marketing alliances – on-line airlines/ transporters, neighbouring States, destination co-op marketing. How other City States/ small countries position themselves Chandigarh is similar in situation to the city states and small countries around the world. The chart below attempts to analyse some of the more successful city states in terms of their drawing power City State Attractions Singapore Trading - Was a trading post to the Far East – Now a Financial hub – Connectivity to the world Manmade attractions – Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, Sentosa Island & ropeway, Acquarium – Shopping, night markets – Golf Hongkong – now part of Trading China, but mainly unchanged Shopping Sports – Horse racing, rugby Macau Gambling – Casino/ Jai Alai Formula 1 races Monaco Gambling Casino & entertainment Formula 1 races Dubai Trading – similar to Singapore Shopping Sports – horse racing, power boats, golf, tennis, cricket Events Mauritius/ Bahamas/ Bermuda Beaches Off-shore companies Sun City, South Africa Casino, Golf,water sports, events Very few City States have the benefit of historical attractions such as at the Vatican. Some like Bahamas, Bermuda and Mauritius have the natural attractions of beaches. Most, however, have had to depend on manmade attractions. It is obvious that those city states that have had a history of trading, have managed to develop themselves as World Financial Centers. As part of this development, they have installed infrastructure for communications, in particular, very broadband channels for Internet. Another off shoot of this development is the growth in media. Dubai, in fact, is building a media city. However, the one striking feature in all these cases is the emphasis on world class standard Recreation and Leisure facilities. While facilities have been created for visitors, they are also used by the residents. – Gambling is a major attraction in Macau, Monaco and Sun City. – Horse racing is big in Hongkong and Dubai. – Sporting events attract people to Singapore, Hongkong, Dubai, Monaco and Sun City. – Entertainment Events are held in Sun City, Dubai, Hongkong, Singapore, Bahamas, Bermuda, Seychelles etc We believe that Chandigarh does have the potential to become a successful city state based on its own draw. It is interesting to note that city States like Dubai, Singapore, Bahamas, Bermuda, Mauritius etc do not rely on their immediate neighbours. Market segments for Chandigarh Tourism Market Segment Potential demand Potential Solutions Residents of Chandigarh Recreation and Leisure appear to be the main 1. Multiplex cinema halls demands. However, Chandigarh residents tend to 2. Amusement Park finish their working days relatively early and night 3. Night food bazaar cum entertainment entertainment demand is limited. 4. Horse Racing Neighbouring States Delhi 1. Transit traffic, specially families with small 1. Delhi - Transit Stopover traffic to Shimla or children on their way to Kulu/ Manali. These start 2. Haryana Kulu/ Manali later in the day from Delhi and the children get 3. Punjab - Short breaks restless after 4 to 5 hours. A good reason to stop 4. Himachal Pradesh Haryana would be an Amusement park. - Recreation & Leisure 2. Recreation & leisure. See comments above. None - Shopping of the contiguous states has developed good R&L - Business facilities except possibly the Gurgaon and - Meetings & Conferences Faridabad districts bordering Delhi. Punjab 3. Shopping. While Jalandhar and Ludhiana have now - Recreation & Leisure got good shopping facilities, they are still behind - Shopping the range offered by Sector 17. If this is combined - Business with R&L, it makes a powerful attraction. - Meetings & conferences 4. Business. This is normally connected with Himachal Pradesh Government. - Recreation & Leisure 5. Meetings and conferences. Chandigarh being the - Shopping State Capital of Haryana and the Punjab as well as - Medical the Northern Region HQ for several trade bodies, can satisfy this need 6. Medical. Medical facilities at the PGI are excellent. The new Fortis Hospital in Mohalli can also contribute to Chandigarh room occupancies Market Segment Potential demand Potential Solutions The Rest of India Apart from transit to HP, and a very small market No strong offer to attract this segment interested in architecture, the tourism demands from the rest of India are not met by Chandigarh NRIs – Also those of Chandigarh is the Gateway to the Punjab NRI’s could be encouraged to expose their children, many Punjab origin NRI Marriages of whom are negative to India, to the modern city beautiful - Chandigarh Other Foreign No real demand State Tourism Policy > Improving the Developing vs. National Tourism quality of places of Policy tourism tourist vvvv products interest Place Tourism on the Concurrent list Effective linkages and close coordination between Departments Safety & Security of Accreditisation Tourists of Shops, transporters Tourism Accounting System Computerisation Concentrate on one major project as State USP World Heritage sites as opportunity to expand cultural Tourism Themed Cultural Sound & Light Attractions at Rock Garden Providing necessary facilities for tourists Effective signages Have police posts at Tourism Information centres Provide a central reservation facility. Provide linkage between Rock Garden and Sukhna Lake and planned amusement park Other Chandigarh has already declared Tourism as an industry in 1994. However, incentives and concessions need to be reviewed Constitute a State Tourism Board/ Tourism Advisory Council Initiate a system for tracking tourism spends Secretariat & High Court complex?? Develop a documentary on the planning and development of Chandigarh State Tourism Policy Improving the Developing Providing Other > quality of places of necessary vs. National Tourism tourism tourist facilities for Policy products interest tourists vvvv Capitalise on Run regular Food traditional cuisines Festivals featuring foods from other States. Actively promote village tourism Exploit the potential of Sukhna Bird Create wildlife sanctuaries sanctuary awareness of the fauna Develop Adventure Improve the Development tourism with safety tourist amenities of the Sports standards at Sukhna lake. center at Kishangarh Recreation & leisure Develop a Dinner Develop an Multiplex Explore the are a vital component cruise on Sukhna amusement possibility of a of the local & regional Lake park. Race Track. This domestic tourism will help week market end occupancies in the hotels MICE to be developed Develop a for tourism, trade and convention commerce centre Develop Eco-tourism Create Develop the through grassroots, environmental Botanical community based consciousness garden movement through gardens Capitalise on the growing awareness of India’s holistic healing traditions Development of Incorporate shopping centers for traditional arts traditional crafts and and crafts with information on them Kalagram State Tourism Policy Improving the Developing Providing Other > quality of places of necessary vs. National Tourism tourism tourist facilities for Policy products interest tourists vvvv Promote the events, The quality of the A daily night fairs and festivals both Saturday Sector market can be locally and in the main 17 entertainment developed markets needs to be reviewed Provide the Convention infrastructure for center Business travel The following projects have been shortlisted Basic Tourism Infrastructure Projects 1. Setting up a system of coordination between Departments through a “Mission Approach” 2. Assessing the economic impact of tourism in Chandigarh through annual surveys and the use of multipliers 3. Setting up police outposts in the new concept “Cultural/ Tourism Centre” 4. Setting up a system for accreditisation of shops and transportation 5. Creating Tourist/ Cultural center Visitor generating projects 6. Promoting traditional cuisine 7. Horse Race track 8. Amusement Park 9. Linking the sightseeing 10. Conference center to attract business travelers 11. Developing the City Centre 12. Adventure tourism & Wildlife Tourism 13. Attracting the Private Sector Project 1 Effective linkages and close coordination between Departments There is a need to set up a system in Chandigarh to coordinate with other departments whose work has a bearing on Tourism. 1) Currently the following Government agencies have a direct impact on tourism products a) CITCO. Here, both Industrial development and Tourism come under the same department. b) Town Planning c) PWD (B&R) d) PHD for water, sewage & sanitation e) Police 2) Private bodies that are directly involved in tourism are the local chapters of a) FHRAI/ HAI b) TAAI/ IATO c) Transporters association 3) Indirect involvement by private sector corporations for business travel requirements and their related associations i) FICCI/ ASSOCHAM/ PHDCC etc. ii) Informed and committed individuals with current or potential interest in the State 4) Some Central Government agencies are also involved. These are a) NHAI b) Indian railways Two related approaches have been used by other Indian States Rajasthan has used a ‘mission’ approach whereby they have set up the Rajiv Gandhi Tourism Mission. This has the commitment from all State Ministries of giving tourism priority treatment. Uttaranchal is the first State to constitute a ‘Tourism Advisory Board’ with participation of both the Government and private sector The roles in planning and identification of projects, problems and solutions are similar. They vary in that the ‘Tourism Advisory Board’ is a body constituted under an Act with broad powers. The ‘Mission Approach’ is not a legal body and is probably easier to implement in states where tourism is not a major industry. Rajasthan - The Mission Approach This is exemplified by Rajasthan’s Rajiv Gandhi Mission on Tourism Development. While not a legal entity, the mission has A nodal agency in the Dept of Tourism, Art and Culture Collaborating agencies o RTDC o Dept of Urban Development o Dept of Archaeology & Museums o PWD o General Administration & Civil Aviation o Forest & Environment o Industries Dept o Devasthan Dept o West Zone Cultural Centre o Khadi & Village Industry Board o Archaeological Survey of India The Mission is structured with a Chairman – Chief Minister Empowered committee chaired by the Chief Secretary Mission Director – Secretary Tourism, Art & Culture District level Sub-Mission – Chairman is District Collector Site/ Local – mini mission A Mission Statement has been defined. Ten Mission objectives have been identifies and a 12 point strategy developed to implement the objectives. The mission statement seeks “To make Tourism the peoples industry”. The objectives and strategy were developed with the help of task forces that surfaced problems and solutions on a variety of subjects including Policy needs. 10 Milestones have been defined and for each milestone specific activity and deadlines detailed. The mission Director coordinates with other departments as well as professionals. The Directorate has the following Advisors Advisor Heritage Advisor Handicrafts Advisor Economist Advisor Media & Marketing Advisor Human Resource Development Advisor Research & Development Advisor Ecology/ Sociology As well as consultants from the private sector 1. Uttaranchal - Constitution of a Tourism Development Board A high level Tourism Development Board has replaced the Tourism Directorate. The responsibilities of this board are a. Formulation and Strategy for development of tourism in Uttranchal b. Preparation of plans and guidelines for developing and strengthening tourism related infrastructure in the state. c. Preparation of plans for various tourist segments and activities, identification and development of projects and ensuring their timely implementation. d. Establishment of standard / norms and framing of policy guidelines for various tourism activities. e. Formulation of a strategy for mobilizing private sector participation and investment in the tourism sector. f. A single window solution to all tourism related information, sanction for projects, escort services for obtaining clearances and approvals from other departments. 2. Identifying Key Projects - Based on the present tourist interest and the future potential in each destination. 3. Outsourcing Expertise - The tourism board empanelled more than hundred experts/ agencies to seek services of specialists and consultancy agencies. 4. Destination Management - The existing tourism centers need destination management plans to maintain and improve their effectiveness. Plans to be made for better connectivity, city decongestion, improvements of accommodation etc. 5. New Destinations - New tourism destinations have been identified which will developed and marketed as spokes to hubs to help in decongesting the hubs. 6. Private Sector Participation - The areas of accommodation facilities, tourist resorts, specialized food restaurants, facilities for adventure sports, amusement parks etc. Special incentives and concessions have been planned. 7. Human Resource Development - Plans to upgrade existing institutes and set up new institutes for diploma and degree training programmes. a) Specialist training for activities like adventure sports etc. b) Self-employment opportunities for local residents to encourage maximum participation of the host community. 8. Infrastructure Development Establishment of world class infrastructure facilities will be the highest priority of Uttranchal government. In order to do this, special efforts are being made to mobilize institutional resources and private sector investment and participation. Recommendation We recommend that Chandigarh start with a mission approach. This would require the backing of the Governor and the Chief Secretary to make it successful. The mission approach provides the coordination required and gives tourism a better profile with other departments. Project 2 Tourism Accounting System Tourism will not get the attention it deserves unless the positive impacts can be demonstrated. Several measures of the changes in economic activity can be generated. The most common are Changes in Sales or spending - The spending of visitors within the local area becomes sales or receipts for local businesses Changes in regional incomes - This is the sum of wages & salaries accruing to workers in these businesses and owners income and profits Changes in employment - Number of jobs supported by the given level of Sales. What is required to be measured for an impact analysis is the changes that occur with the introduction or closing down of facilities. In simple terms, the economic impact is Economic impact= change in # of visitors * average spend/visitor* Multiplier A visitor is defined by someone who lives outside the region so only ‘new’ spendings are measured. The overall impact is normally arrived at by c) Measuring distinct visitor segments eg. Day trips, transit, stayover, business travel, Government expenditure on tourism related activities including museums, cultural activities, recreational parks etc. d) Measuring spending in distinct categories – lodging, restaurants, meals, petrol etc. e) Allocating spending to receiving sectors and applying ratios and multipliers The first two measure primary effects. Secondary effects are of two types a) Indirect effects are changes in spending, income and jobs within the region in sectors that supply goods and services to the tourism sector. This requires an input-output matrix. b) Induced effects are the increased spends by residents from the incomes earned in tourism and the supporting sectors. Multipliers are required to capture the secondary effects and are generally sxpressed as a ratio to direct effects. These can be sales, income and employment multipliers. The World Bank has estimated that for every Rs 10 lakhs invested in India, the following number of direct jobs are created In Tourism projects 47.5 jobs In Hotels and restaurants 89.0 jobs In agriculture 44.7 jobs In Manufacturing 12.7 jobs Tata Consultancy Service has also estimated that for every direct job created in tourism, 4.62 indirect jobs are created in ancillary areas. The World Travel & Tourism Council uses a ‘Direct Revenue Multiplier’ in tourism of 2.07. While the intention of the Ministry of Tourism is to get a better understanding of the positive effects of tourism, at this stage the mechanism is not in place to collect the details in all sectors. Recommendation We suggest that Chandigarh Tourism puts in place a mechanism to collect data on direct effects. This may initially be in the form of annual surveys extrapolated to cover the State and calculated using the multipliers above. This will give Chandigarh Tourism the hard data required to substantiate the benefits of Tourism. Project 3 SAFETY & SECURITY SPECIAL TOURISM POLICE The National Tourism policy states that “There is a need for the creation of a special tourism police force for deployment at major tourist destinations. This will provide travelers security through a spirit of courtesy and hospitality.” While the creation of a special force at State level may not be feasible, the spirit of providing a sense of security to travelers is an important aspect. At the very least, all Tourist information centers – see note on the concept – should have a police outpost which can deal with crimes against tourists. The awareness of these police outposts should be widely created with hotels, restaurants and shopping centers in the relevant districts. There is no cost involved in this activity PROJECT 4. ACCREDITISATION OF SHOPS AND TRANSPORT AGENCIES Two other areas where most tourists feel insecure in the sense of being cheated are Tourist shops and transportation. It is suggested that Chandigarh Tourism institute a system of accrediting these establishments. For shops, the requirements are simple All items will be price tagged All sales will be subject to return in undamaged condition Shops will carry the accreditisation plaque/ sticker with the number of the monitoring agency For transport, again requirements can be kept simple Taxis/ rickshaws will be metered or carry a tariff sheet No fare will be refused if the taxi/ rickshaw is at a stand Participating transport will carry a plaque/ sticker with the number of the monitoring agency Participating transport drivers may be asked to wear a uniform In both cases, complaints will be taken up with the offending shop/ vehicle owner. A repeat complaint will bar the shop/ vehicle from carrying the plaque/ sticker. Recommendation We recommend that Chandigarh Tourism issue a tourist-cum-shopping guide – preferably in the form of a Chandigarh map - listing accredited shops and transporters. Maps should be given free at hotels, Sukhna Lake, Rock Garden and Sector 17 market. The cost of the guide can be recovered by advertising and sale of guides. PROJECT 6 PROMOTING TRADITIONAL CUISINES Indian cuisine is not just a trend internationally – no longer represented by just Tandoori Chicken – but within the country there is a growing interest in regional cuisine. Kerala vegetarian and non-vegetarian restaurants are thriving. Gujarati, Konkan, Chettinad and Punjabi outlets are being well patronized in the metros. In the past, extremely successful food festivals have been held at Kala Gram. Kalagram is an ideal venue between Chandigarh and Panchkula. It is suggested that State Tourism departments be contacted to conduct food festivals on an ongoing basis. Some arrangement will need to be worked out with the North Region Cultural Centre, but as this is a win-win situation for both parties – and the general public, this should be possible. Kalagram may require additional parking facilities. The neighbouring States of Himachal, Punjab, Uttar Pradesh, Uttaranchal, Haryana, Rajasthan, Jammu & Kashmir and Delhi can all be approached to hold festivals in Chandigarh. Chandigarh Tourism is also looking at promoting outbound traffic to adjoining States, and they may wish to use this platform more often. If the months of May to July are excluded, it should be possible to organize a festival every month, thereby giving Chandigarh residents and visitors an additional area of recreation and leisure. The festivals should be accompanied with performing arts and display the State handicrafts. Recommendation We recommend food festivals of various states be held at Kala Gram on an ongoing basis. This activity does not require much additional infrastructure and is in fact a revenue generating activity. Visitor numbers Past food festivals at Kalagram have generated 4-5000 visitors per festival over a 3-4 day festival period. If festivals are held monthly at a fixed period, say second weekend of the month or the full moon nights, the numbers can be sustained. 9 festivals x 5,000 visitors per festival = 45,000 visitors Revenues Revenues to Chandigarh Tourism/ Kalagram will be generated by entrance tickets and stall rentals. Stall owners – handicrafts/ F&B – will have direct sales revenues. Assume expenditure @ Rs 50 per visitor for handicrafts/ F&B/ parking 9 Food & Cultural Festivals/ annum Entrance fees = Rs 10 x 45,000 Stall rentals @ Rs5000 x 9 festival x 15 stalls Revenues to stall owners 45,000 x Rs 50 Costs = Rs 4.5 lakhs = Rs 6.75 lakhs = Rs 22.5 lakhs Venue costs are minimal as infrastructure exists. There will be promotional costs Project 12 Wildlife Tourism The Government of India, Department of Tourism has identified the development of wildlife sanctuaries as a priority item. Specific suggestions are to improve the quality of tourist facilities including Visitor information/ interpretation centers. Chandigarh has the Sukhna Bird sanctuary. As a reserved forest, people are not allowed without permission. This area should not be developed further. However, Chandigarh also has a wealth of flora. While the gardens attempt to highlight this, it is not generally known that there are over 1000 variety of trees in Chandigarh. Recommendation We do not recommend any additional expenditure other than that normally budgeted for this activity. Project 12 A Adventure Tourism Chandigarh has limited scope for adventure tourism. Apart from promoting serious boating – rowing, sculls, sailing, regattas - in Sukhna Lake, the area is not conducive to pursuing adventure tourism. Recommendation We do not recommend any additional expenditure on this activity other than that normally budgeted. Upgrading the facilities for the above can be taken up by the private sector. Project 5 Concept for Cultural / Tourism Information Centres These should be part of the City ‘Recreation and Leisure’ complex, and are envisioned as centers to showcase the State – a cross between Dilli Haat and National Crafts Museum. At the very least they should have 1. Tourist office with all information on the State 2. Central reservation capabilities for hotel and tour packages. a. These can be manned/ funded by the State Hotel Association & State Travel agent associations b. Space can also be rented to airlines, railways and travel trade associations. 3. A permanent live exhibition of the State’s traditional lifestyle, arts and crafts. This can be modeled on the National Crafts Museum. a. Artisans sell their goods directly and/ or through a central shop. The center provides a platform for the artisan on a revenue share or straight lease. b. State produce can also be sold e.g Basmati rice 4. A permanent restaurant featuring the State cuisine. a. This should be leased with stipulations on the menu and service standards b. The area can also carry periodic photo exhibits/ art exhibits. 5. Some permanent shops can be incorporated and leased out. a. Factory outlets of manufacturers based in the State is one example. 6. An open air amphitheatre to showcase the State’s performing arts a. This should also have screening facilities for documentaries b. This can be leased for private functions including marriages, film shooting 7. Open spaces for putting up stalls for celebrating State festivals a. These can be handicrafts and food stalls leased to private parties. 8. Space should also be allotted to other State Tourism bodies 9. A police outpost where problems faced by tourists can be addressed. Estimated costs for construction of this cultural centers are Activity Budget Tourist office building with space for State tourist offices, Central 50 lakhs reservations office, restaurant and police outpost, other offices Live exhibition of State’s arts and crafts, permanent shops 10-15 lakhs Open air amphitheatre – 750-100 persons 10 lakhs Space for temporary stalls for State festivals 2 lakhs Recommendation This should be set up in the amusement park area planned near Sukhna lake. Visitor numbers The objective of this facility is to provide service, not generate additional visitors, though there will be an indirect effect. Revenues Office rentals 10 offices x Rs10,000/ month Restaurant rental @ Rs 20,000/ month Shop rentals 10 shops x Rs 20,000/ month Amphitheatre rentals 20 functions @ Rs 20,000 Costs = Rs 12.0 lakhs = Rs 2.4 lakhs = Rs 24.0 lakhs = Rs 4.0 lakhs Ongoing costs are for maintenance and common utilities @ Rs 24 lakhs/ year. Funding The initial capital required is Rs 70-75 lakhs. Breakeven is achieved in 4-5 years and thereafter, it is a profitable operation. Attracting the Private Sector While there appears to be no requirement to incentivise the building of hotels, there are other tourism related activities that would need incentives to attract the private sector. We recommend that Chandigarh Government consider the following to develop a package of incentives.. INCENTIVES FOR TRAVEL & LEISURE INDUSTRY 1. Assistance on project report preparation 2. Concessional land for specified projects 3. Entertainment tax exemption for 5 years 4. Capital investment subsidy of 20% subject to a maximum of Rs 20 lakhs 5. Recommendation of loans to Financial Institutions 6. Interest subsidy on loans from approved financial institutions 7. Energy subsidy 8. Concessions on stamp duties/ reimbursement – urban areas, rural areas 9. Concessions on Change in land use fees 10. Excise licence fees concessions 11. Concession on Transport taxes on vehicles used for this activity. INVOLVING THE NON TRAVEL & LEISURE SECTOR IN TOURISM ACTIVITIES Chandigarh has over 25 corporates and PSUs with turnovers of over Rs 100 crores. These all have some commitment to Chandigarh and can be approached for sponsoring various activities that can improve the tourist experience. Greening of the environment – road dividers, green belts, parks Cleaning of the environment – garbage bins and collection Sponsorships of o signage o projects such as handicraft villages o events such as local festivals o information kiosks o tourist literature The companies may be compensated in terms of exposure available. It is also common to have directional signs to the company premises. Project 7 Horse Race Course Horse racing is an activity that draws week end traffic. In India, the main race tracks are in Mumbai and Kolkata. These depend largely on the local population with free income. However, Pune and Bangalore both have successful race tracks where the attendance is from outside the city. The race season in these two cities fills hotels over the normally low weekends. Revenue sources for Race Clubs are Club memberships Sponsorship of Corporate boxes Club house activities F&B concessions/ sales Gate money from attendees. Sponsorship of races. Programme sales Programme advertising Horses pay to race/ stable Share of tote Off-season revenues are buoyed by off track betting. Race tracks around the country pay for live telecasts via satellite. o This brings in viewership of about 2 lakh people Race tracks are also labour intensive, both for the track and for anciliary activities like stud farms, training paddocks, stables and for manning the accommodations for staff, trainers jockeys etc. A quality race course with a 2000 meter track requires an area of about 200 acres depending on the shape of the plot. On clear grounds, a race track can be laid in 100 acres. The area around Chandigarh and Delhi have the best stud farms in the country. Many are owned by political figures. There are at least 10 stud farms in the North where horses are bought for racing across the country. Owners of stud farms currently need to travel to other race tracks to promote their products. The Delhi Race Course does not cater to quality horse races. Setting up a race track is complicated. Tracks like Hongkong, Singapore, Malaysia, Kentucky etc all have their own systems and one suitable for Chandigarh will need to be worked out in conjunction with stud farms, race horse owners, authorities etc. The modern tote systems are totally electronic and cost upto Rs 2 crores. They are backed by broadband access to allow off track betting and satellite broadcast/ reception. The indicated expense of setting up an entire race course with track, club house, stabling, accommodation, tote machines etc is in the region of Rs 40-50 crores minus cost of land. The facility is usually given on long lease. Note Mr. Narendra Lagad from Pune is an acknowledged authority on setting up race courses. He has set up one in Kandy, Sri Lanka. (Contacts are 020-6879495/ 6870217/ 098220-28285 e-mail : narendralagad@hotmail.com ) Recommendation Chandigarh further examine the feasibility of including a Race Course in the Master Plan. The Club can have other sports facilities to attract memberships. Accommodation for out of town visitors should also be examined. The entire project should be in th private sector. Visitor numbers Race attendees 15 race days x 5000 attendees = 75,000 30 off track x 1000 attendees = 30,000 Club Members Permanent members = 500 Out station members = 300 Revenues 1. Gate money Race days 75,000 x Rs50 = Rs 37.5 lakhs Off track 30,000 x Rs 20 = Rs 6.0 lakhs 2. Club memberships 500 members x Rs 2 lakhs = Rs 1000 lakhs 300 outstation x Rs 75,000 = Rs 225 lakhs 3. Monthly dues + usage 300 x Rs 1000 = Rs 3.0 lakhs 300 x Rs 400 = Rs 1.2 lakhs 4. Company sponsored boxes 10 x Rs 5 lakhs/ year = Rs 50 lakhs 5. F&B concessions 45 days x 5 concessions x Rs5000 = Rs 11.25 lakhs 6. Programme sales 1 programme per 4 attendees xRs 10 = Rs 2.6 lakhs 7. Programme advertising @ Rs 1 lakh a programme x 45 = Rs 45 lakhs 8. Race charges 15 races x 8 horses x Rs 5000 = Rs 6.0 lakhs 9. Share of tote 5% of 105K attendees x Rs 200 per = Rs 105 lakhs Plus royalties for live telecasts. Costs - Ongoing 1. Race purses/ prizes – At least 2 prizes per meet can be sponsored by Corporate Houses. 2. Personnel – This includes a. Tote supervisors/ tellers/ gate entrance/ horsemen’s book keeper b. Racing secretariat/ starter/ announcer/ stewards/ paddock judge. Some of these can be voluntary positions c. Club house personnel d. Track maintenance/ security 3. Equipment maintenance. This can be outsourced 4. Insurance 5. Utilities 6. Track Maintenance 7. Advertising. Programme printing Funding recommendation The requirement is Rs 40-50 crores plus cost of land. The entire project should be tendered to the Private Sector. There are a variety of ways this can be managed from JV to fixed leases to profit/ revenue sharing. Project 8 Amusement Park Attracting tourists en route to Himachal Pradesh Up to less than ten years ago, given the state of the highways and the quality of cars, most tourists driving from Delhi to the Himachal destinations of Shimla and Kullu- Manali required up to 6 hours to reach the Chandigarh environments. For many, especially those on their way to Kullu-Manali or those traveling with young children, a stop-over in Chandigarh was very convenient. Today, the distance is covered in 4 hours or less and Chandigarh is now accessed before lunch. Given that the average person can comfortably drive 400 Km or 6 hours a day, they can easily reach Shimla. Also given the fact that car ownership is increasing at over 18% a year and that domestic tourism is increasing at 5% a year, traffic to Himachal out of Delhi will only increase over the next decade. The increased tourism promotion activity of Uttaranchal will also spur the HP Government to promote tourism more actively. Therefore, it is imperative that some portion of the transit traffic to Kullu-Manali is attracted to overnight in Chandigarh. The logical segment to attract is those traveling with children as children tire of long car trips. In short, the attraction should be oriented to children. Therefore, we propose an amusement cum water park. The water park would be a major attraction as most movement to the hills is in the Summer months. This need not be on the scale of a Disney World, but the rides and facilities of Appu Ghar but with quality equipment would suffice. This would also be a facility for the local population of Chandigarh, providing reasonably priced family entertainment, currently available in very limited scope. The ideal location for this facility would be in the Kishangarh area, adjacent to the current leisure areas of Sukhna Lake, the Golf course and the Rock Garden. This has already been identified by Chandigarh Town Planning. The park should be marketed to the specific segment of families with small children traveling to Kulu/ Manali. Possible facilities in an amusement park are listed below. While weekend usage will be high, it is necessary to balance the products to drive traffic throughout the week and throughout the day. The analysis below attempts this. Weekday usage Invest Direct Indirect Attraction AM PM Night ment jobs jobs Amusement Park - Ferris Wheel, slides, rides, dodgem cars Med Hi Hi Animal rides Med Hi Lo Bowling Med Hi Hi Casino/ Slot Machines Lo Med Hi Cultural Centre - Dilli Haat style to showcase the State Hi Hi Hi Fairground stalls - games of chance and skill Med Med Hi Food Court - Vishala/ Chowkidana Lo Lo Hi Go-karting Lo Lo Hi Kiddies play centre - Primeplay, Softlands Hi Hi Med Mini-golf - Putt Putt Med Med Hi Science Centre- Eg. Panorama in Kurukshetra Hi Hi Lo Shopping mall - designer shops a la Santushti, factory outlets, discount clubs Hi Hi Med Roller Skating rink Lo Med Hi Swimming Pool - heated(?) Hi Hi Hi Water Park Lo Med Hi Mini - Zoo Hi Hi Med Name of Park Area in Annual Entrance fees excluding video acres Visitors games and some selected rides. lakhs Child below 1 metre free. Essel World, Gorai 64 18–20 Child Rs.200/ Adult Rs 250 Water Kingdom, Gorai 24 12-14 Child Rs225/ Adult Rs 275 Nicco Park, Kolkata 40 12-13 Kishi Kintha, Chennai 10 VGP Universal, M’puram 8 Appu Garh, Delhi 6-7 MGM, Chennai 5-6 Fun city, Chandigarh 4 Child Rs140/ Adult Rs 140 Fun & Food Village, Delhi 12 5 Nicco Bhubhaneswar 15 2-2.5 Nicco Jamshedpur 8 2-2.5 Great Escapes, Nagpur 2 Visitor numbers Given that Fun City, with its less than prime location, attracts around 5 lakh visitors a year, and that the recommended location can easily attract highway traffic to Himachal, it is not unreasonable to base visitor numbers at 5 lakhs a year going up to 7 over 3-4 years. Visitor spends Factoring in student discounts and free children, Essel World/ Water Kingdom average Rs 175 per visitor. In Chandigarh, the average will probably be around Rs 150. In addition, visitors spend on parking, F&B and souvenirs as also on specialized rides and video games. An average visitor spend on items other than entrance is taken at Rs 50 per visitor. Therefore revenues can be assumed to be 5 lakhs x Rs 150 = Rs 7.5 crores on entrance fees and a further 5 lakhs x Rs 50 = Rs 2.5 crores on other items. Total revenues Rs 10 crores Costs It costs roughly Rs 1.0 crore an acre to create an amusement park. The investment in Chandigarh will be in the region of Rs 15 crores. Funding It is recommended that Chandigarh Tourism tenders the entire project to private sector. There a variety of ways this can be done from JV to various types of leases. Marketing This will be done by the amusement park operator. Project 9 Linking the sightseeing Chandigarh Tourism has recently introduced the Hop-on Hop-off bus linking the sightseeing of Chandigarh in an extremely user-friendly manner. This works very well for attractions that are fairly wide spread from each other where customers are willing to wait the 15 minutes to half an hour for the next lift. However, when attractions are relatively close together, waiting for the bus versus walking to the next attraction becomes a dilemma and an irritant. The main case in point is the 1 km distance between the Rock Garden and Sukhna Lake, both ‘must see’ attractions of Chandigarh. The walk versus the wait for the bus, specially with children, are both unattractive options! The other alternative option is to pay a hefty fare to the auto rickshaws It is understood that Chandigarh Town Planning has proposed leisure activities in the area beyond the Lake and between the existing Golf Course and Kishangarh. These are A sports complex Health resort/ picnic huts Amusement park This, along with the activities already existing in the Sukhna Lake area, make this area a hub of leisure activities, visited by all Chandigarh tourists and most Chandigarh residents. There are several possible solutions to ease this situation for the Chandigarh tourist. Regulate the auto rickshaws to charge the official fares o Auto rickshaws will probably boycott the stand as the potential fare is the minimum drop of flag amount. o It is probably not economically viable to increase the number of buses that would be required to increase frequency over the entire circuit. Introduce a shuttle bus between the two places o This would require one more bus to shuttle every 10 minutes o Customers may not be willing to pay any amount over and above the basic Hop-on Hop-off fare for a bus service that is seen to be part of the same system. Introduce a novel form of cheap transport between the two locations. Some alternatives o Animal drawn buggies o An elevated monorail/ rail system It has been indicated that a 2 Km elevated track would be extremely costly. The monorail is necessarily electric o A conventional rail track with ‘antique’ engines and coaches in miniature. This would be like the narrow gauge railway to Matheran/ Darjeeling. The engine would be a diesel/ electric engine and could be designed like the ‘Fairy Queen’. This would be an attraction in it’s own right. A diesel/ electric train can be run very cost-efficiently. Pollution versus a steam train is minimal Recommendation It is recommended that a narrow gauge track and rake be commissioned to the private sector. Revenues From ticket sales The Rock Garden receives an average of 3,000 – 5,000 visitors a day. All visitors to the Rock Garden also go to Sukhna Lake. With the development of the Recreational Area, the Sports complex, the Tourist & Healht Resort and the Amusement park, the number of visitors can only increase. If 35 -40% of the visitors use the transport, which is an attraction in itself, this is roughly 1500 passengers a day @ Rs 5/ passenger = Rs 2.25 lakhs/ month. If running/ maintenance costs are 50%, net profits are Rs 1 lakh a month for a 70 month breakeven. If the Amusement Park and Tourist Health and Sports Centre are developed in Kishangarh, the numbers will rise dramatically. In addition, there will be opportunity of generating revenues from advertising on the train. Costs The estimated cost for setting down 2 Km of track is Rs 20 lakhs and the cost of the train, 4 coaches with 50 passenger capacity is Rs 20 lakhs. The engine is Rs 30 lakhs for a total project cost of Rs 70 lakhs Sources of funds It is recommended that this project be funded by Chandigarh Tourism. The Indian railways may be approached to set up a mini rail museum in this area. Marketing There is no marketing and promotion necessary and hence no specific marketing costs. Project 10 Conference Centre for Business Travel Businessmen travel to Meet buyers Meet suppliers Visit Home/ branch offices Incentive travel – where the travel is an incentive reward for better performance Attend conferences – own company and business associations The first three reasons for travel cannot be influenced by third parties. Business travel however can be generated to particular destinations through incentive travel and through conferences, conventions and exhibitions. Apart from road, rail and air access which is a common essential to develop these activities, and which is adequate in Chandigarh, each of the above also has its own requirements. Incentive Travel Incentive destinations are typically not those with cultural attractions but those with a wide range of leisure activities and nightlife. The participants of an incentive group are all prize winners of performance awards and are looking for a fun time in a place that ordinarily would be out of reach of their pockets or regular family holiday destinations. Chandigarh is not suited for incentive travel. Meetings, Conventions and Exhibitions Meetings and conferences These are traditionally organized by companies for their own staff, distribution chain and, occasionally, suppliers. They are company need-based to communicate messages that require some interaction to a medium sized audience. The size of the company in terms of number of people and the spread of distribution are the prime drivers of meetings and conferences. Apart from companies headquartered in Chandigarh, those headquartered in the surrounding districts of the Punjab and Haryana are also candidates for holding meetings and conferences in Chandigarh. A listing of such companies is attached. Conventions and Seminars These are meetings held for multiple organizations interested in the same topic. They are usually organized by industry associations, professional associations, management associations, universities and NGOs to discuss topics of common interest. Among the more common conventions are various medical disciplines, religious, environmental subjects etc. However, the local chapter of the association needs to drive the organization of conventions and seminars. Typically, a bid document is put up to the national body that then may make an inspection trip to view facilities. The bid is normally submitted with comprehensive back-up documentation which apart from the core expertise is exhibited, the documentation covers extra-curricular activities during the day for spouses and evening and night entertainment, accommodation facilities, transportation etc. The local chapter must also organize the convention/ seminar. This can be fairly complicated and many organizations do not have in-house expertise. Successful conventions require that organizers are educated in meetings management. Cities that have evolved as convention destinations generally have a dedicated ‘Convention Visitors Bureau’ that works with local organizations to generate conventions. The Bureau has full time employees and a committee made up of representatives from the local tourism, hospitality, transport facilities as well as Associations. The attachment gives some organizations that can generate conventions in Chandigarh. Exhibitions Exhibitions are held to display products. These may be organized by Companies – A launch of new products is usually accompanied by an exhibition Associations – Manufacturing associations, agricultural associations and other industry associations including travel, automobile, job fairs all require exhibition area. Exhibition halls, typically being unfurnished have multi usage potential such as marriages, concerts and other social events. It appears that there is scope for a meetings facility in Chandigarh. Given that hotel capacities, both current and in the future, will be contained by town planning, the conference facility should not be too large. Chandigarh Town Planning has already identified a 7 acre plot in Sector 31, next to the CII Northern region Headquarters. Recommendation It is suggested that this offers A venue for General Body meetings of 600-800 persons (Approx 600-800 sq.mtr). This would be auditorium seating 3-4 break-out rooms. These are not with any fixed seating but should have capacities ranging from 50 to 150 persons theatre style.( Approx 400 sq.mts) Exhibition area of approximately 1500 sq.mtr Business center facilities Restaurant and snack Bar Parking Visitor numbers Typically, utilization of convention and exhibition area space is taken at 25% of capacity, even though it is possible to use spaces more than once a day. Exhibition area space may be better utilised as it has multi-functionality for social occasions. A 600 seat auditorium with break out rooms should see a throughput of roughly 55,000 persons a year. The exhibition space will have utilization for both exhibits and social functions. These are mutually exclusive. If the space is used 25% for exhibitions - 90 days a year including set up and knock down times – in other words exhibits available for 60-65 days, throughput of visitors will be 60-65,000. Of the 270 days available for social functions, we can take a utilization of 40% or 100 days with an average marriage attendance of 500 pax, this will be 50,000 pax. Visitor revenues Revenues from conference hall Rentals per event @ Rs 20,000/event x 90 days = Rs 18 lakhs F&B on attendance of 55,000 x Rs 200 = Rs 110 lakhs Revenues from exhibition hall Rentals per event @ Rs 20,000 x 90 days = Rs 18 lakhs F& B on attendance of 60,000 x Rs 25 = Rs 15 lakhs Revenues on Social functions Attendance 50,000 x Rs 200 = Rs 100 lakhs Total = Rs 261 lakhs Cost The total cost of construction of approximately 3000 sq.mtrs convention center will be in the region of Rs 8-10 crores. Landscaping 7 acres with parking will be around Rs 15 Lakhs. Profitability of rental income is around 80% - Rs 29 lakhs - and F&B income around 50% - Rs 112 lakhs for a total profitability of Rs 140 lakhs approx. Project viability break even in 5 –7 years. Funding Sources Part of the cost of construction can be de-frayed by Corporates paying to have some of the break-out rooms and possibly the main auditorium named after their company/ founder. ASSOCHAM has done this successfully with their HQ in Delhi. Marketing A convention promotion bureau should be set up. Potential clients for conferences and conventions both in India and abroad are easily identified from ICCA and other association lists. The convention bureau will need to work with their India Chapters to prepare attractive bid documents. Project 11 Energising the City Centre Sector 17 is the City Centre of Chandigarh. While most sectors have their own markets for daily essentials, Sector 17 is where aspirational ‘Lifestyle’ products are retailed. The market has been designed with vast pedestrian spaces and is eminently suitable to be developed as a social and entertainment hub. Apart from the months of May & June, Chandigarh weather is suitable for outdoor activities Evenings - Mid March to end April, July to November During the Day - December to mid March A social and entertainment hub would require Shopping for aspirational items. This trend already exists in Sector 17. Opening hours should allow for late shopping. Night market stalls of handicraft items should be allowed Special Sales periods/ Shopping Carnivals should be announced in advance Range of F&B outlets. There is a reasonable range of outlets. These should be encouraged. Liquor licences should be made more easily available and extension of service should be allowed till 1am. Entertainment Movie Halls/ multiplexes/ open air movies and documentaries Video parlours/ Bowling alleys/ slot machines Street entertainment. Local performing artists and those performing at Kalagram, All the Chandigarh festivals could be moved to Sector 17 – April Fools Day, Mango Festival, Indo-Pak Mushaira, Chrysanthamum Show Administration Energising the City Centre would require the active involvement of the Sector 17 shop keepers who have the most to gain from this initiative. They should be brought into the very initial planning stages. These activities do not require large funding, but coordination is crucial for success. Committees comprised of shop keepers and Chandigarh Administration should be formed for various types of activities. Funding As noted, large funds are not required. It should be possible to levy a small cess on shop turnover to fund activities. Marketing This is aimed to provide a focal point for Chandigarh residents. Communicating events will not require more than posters in Sector 17 and other sector markets. Attracting Private Sector Investment In Tourism Sector 1. Taxes 1.1 Rationalisation of taxes Expenditure tax is imposed by National Government while Luxury tax by State Governments. With the Expenditure tax, which is being levied at 10% where room charges are Rs. 3000 or more, being discontinued from 1 June 2003 as per the Union Budget 2003 and no Luxury tax levied, Chandigarh has an advantage over its neighbouring States. Incase in future Expenditure tax or any other tax is levied, then it is preferable to review the effect of total tax while calculating the taxes to be levied on the hotel industry. Moreover these taxes may be charged on the actual room tariff rather on published tariff rate card. 1.2 Other taxes In addition Service tax by Center and Entertainment tax by UT are also being imposed on the hotels. In the Union Budget 2003 services provided by the Hotels are exempted from Service tax. The rates of these taxes, together with expenditure tax and luxury tax, may be decided considering the composite tax (indirect taxes) rate for the hotel industry. The composite tax on hotel industry in India vis-à-vis neighbouring countries is presented in the table below: Composite Tax on Country Hotel Industry (%) India 30* Indonesia 21 Thailand 17 Malaysia 15 Singapore 14 Source: PHDCCI * Estimation includes 10% expenditure tax. 1.3 Sales Tax The Sales tax on beverages and liquor is 12% in the UT, which is moderately higher, compared to other states like Uttar Pradesh, Himachal Pradesh, Punjab, Delhi, etc. Keeping in view the tax structure of other States and especially neighbouring States, Chandigarh may reconsider the sales tax rates for these. 1.4 Transport tax Chandiragh has no transport tax while its neighbouring states Punjab and Haryana are charging the same. A single point tax collection system may be implemented in order to simplify the procedure and ensure smooth movement of tourist inter-states. Further, the tax rate per quarter levied on air-conditioned and non air-conditioned tourist vehicles may be limited by an overall cap amount for the country. 1.5 Power The cost of electricity is a major component in the overall cost structure for a hotel and hence may need to be maintained in line with other comparative States. 1.6 Foreign exchange earnings The UT may consider requesting the Centre for the extension of the time frame of income tax exemption on export earning under section 80HHD of the Income Tax Act 1961. The tourism sector may be granted this extension as like other exporters they too export their services and earn foreign exchange for the country. However, we may mention that it is unlikely that Centre will agree to this request as it has announced phasing out of such incentives. 1.7 Income Tax The UT may also request Centre for providing investments in hotels as well as other industry in the tourism sector with Tax Holiday for a pre-determined period which can be decided in consultation with the various departments and the private sector participants. In order to promote new investments in a particular industry, request for tax holiday for about 5 years for new investments, applicable for 2 year from the current financial year, may be sought. This may likely create positive interest among private sector to invest in these industries with in 2 years to avail the tax holiday. Here too, we may like to mention that the Centre providing such benefits is very unlikely. 2. Investment 2.1 Land rates The Government may consider providing land at concessional rates for construction of hotels and other infrastructure for tourism by private investor. Alternatively, Government may provide land free of cost and acquire stake in the new project constructed on it by private sector through a join venture. The Government has draft a joint venture policy for attracting private sector, a review of which is also incorporated in this report. 2.2 Stamp duty Chandigarh may consider reducing the stamp duty levied especially in the area related to pilgrimages, rural area, etc. 2.3 One window clearance Chandigarh may provide one window clearance to the prospective private sector willing to invest in the UT. This will ensure speedy and efficient investment procedure for the private sector thereby attracting necessary investments. 3. Administrative Structure 3.1 Tourism Advisory Board The UT may strive towards constituting a board or a council comprising members from Tourism Development Corporation, Investment Promotion Board, Industrial Development Corporation, National Tourism Corporation/Department, etc. which will be primarily responsible for co-ordination and monitoring of tourism related activities and projects to ensure proper implementation of Tourism Policy. A detailed suggestion is set out in this report earlier. 3.2 Tourism Development Fund The UT may implement Targeted Funding approach by creating Tourism Development Fund (TDF) which will be recipient of all revenues generated from tourism and tourism related businesses. The Fund will be created by raising low interest loans from multilateral agencies that are actively involved in providing financial assistance to public/private sectors for infrastructure development. A Special Purpose Vehicle may be created where all the funds raised will be parked and a deployed in developing infrastructure to enhance tourism sector. The identification of infrastructure for the development can be done in consultation with other administrative bodies, which are also responsible in developing infrastructure of the state to ensure proper co-ordination between all such bodies. 4. Infrastructure The Government may try to identify areas of strategic importance and involve private sectors in non-strategic areas. Further it may try to segregate core and non-core activities involved in the areas of strategic importance e.g. maintenance of railway platform, maintenance of bus station, etc. and allow private sectors in these activities. Such activities may be provided on a license basis, lease basis, etc. as decided after a proper study of the same. The funds raised by disinvesting of these non-core activities can be utilised in developing infrastructure of the UT. 5. Promotion Chandigarh may plan for an advertising strategy, which will attract tourist from the desired regions and thus benefiting the tourism industry in the UT. This will increase the interest of the private sector in investing in the tourism sector in the UT. The advertising strategy may include amongst others: Shopping festivals, Fun and Fair festivals, Rural art and handicraft festivals, etc. Options for Attracting Private Sector Participation The projects in tourism, like infrastructure projects, too have long gestation period and requires huge capital investment initially. Further, the feasibility of tourism related projects are contingent on development and quality of infrastructure of the region like power, road, railway, water and communications. No single individual agency either the private sector or the Government could finance the sector all alone as the investment required are large and the risk too is relatively higher. Hence part of the load of development of tourism sector may be shared by the inclusion of private sector There are primarily two ways of sharing the responsibility with the private sector: Attracting Private Sector for new projects on all alone basis, Creating Public Private Partnership for new projects, Creating Public Private Partnership for existing projects owned by Government bodies, and Privatisation of existing projects to private sector. A brief note on each method of involving private sector is set out below: 1. Attracting Private Sector for new projects: The private sector may be attracted towards new projects related to tourism like Leisure centers, entertainment parks, theatres, health spa, hotels, etc. by providing incentives for such investments. The list of incentives, applicable period, industry, investment amount, etc may be decided once the type of industry in the tourism sector is identified where Government would like the private sector to accept the responsibility. 2. Creating Public Private Partnership for new projects: The strategy to encourage Public Private Partnership include creating a Tourism Development Finance Company and developing alternative options for partnerships. 2.1 Tourism Development Finance Company A TDFC may be formed with the investment from various state as well as centre owned financial institutions and inviting private sector and international agencies too may be considered. The main role of TDFC will to promote investment in tourism sector by providing long term debt and equity for the same. 2.2 Alternative Models The alternative models for Public Private Partnership for new projects is set out below: Build Operate Transfer (BOO) The private participant invest, executes the project, runs the business and transfer the property to the Government after the agreed span of period is over. Build Operate Lease Transfer (BOLT) The private sector will invest, execute the project, operate the business and then transfer the assets to the Government on completion of agreed span of time. After the hand over of the assets to the Government the private participant will get fixed income by way of lease, which is agreed during the inception. Build Own Operate and Transfer (BOOT) The private sector will invest, execute the project, own the assets created, operate the business and then transfer the assets to the Government on recovery of investments made at a designated rate of return. Until such time the hand over of the assets to the Government is completed, the private participant is responsible for maintenance and operation of the assets. 3. Creating Public Private Partnership for existing projects owned by Government bodies: The private sector may be interested in few existing projects owned by the Government, which the latter may like to share the responsibility of day-today-operation of the business but at the same time would also like to retain stake in the assets. We may like to mention that such properties may be spun-off as a separate entity and private sector may be invited to run the business in following two ways: Formation of Joint Venture by inclusion of a private strategic partner: The private participant will invest funds in the new entity (existing project spun-off) and in return the Government will provide stake in the entity. While the private participant will be primarily be responsible for operating and strategic management decisions, approval of key decisions will required an concurrence from the Government. Issuing license for management control to private parties and retaining ownership with the Government: The private participant neither provides any fund to the Government nor invests funds in the existing project. The ownership of the entity lies with the Government whereas the day-to-day operations are carried out by the private participant for a fixed fee or a revenue sharing model as agreed upon. 4. Privatisation of existing projects to private sector: The step wise strategy for privatisation of the tourism related properties is set out below: 4.1 Setting up a Commission The UT/Center may initiate the process of privatisation by setting up a Privatisation Commission (or Disinvestment Commission) for the purpose of privatisation of Government owned Tourism related properties. The commission will be primarily responsible for reviewing all properties with respect to the financial status of the properties, priority of privatisation, the strategic importance of the property, etc. 4.2 Identification of Tourism Properties Subsequently, the commission will identify the Government owned properties related to tourism to be disinvested and the approach in which the privatisation process will be adopted. The various strategies, which may be considered for the privatisation, are set out below: a. The related properties may be clubbed together and privatised, b. Create chain of hotels, chain of restaurants, chain of dhabas, etc and privatise each chain, c. Sell certain properties on stand alone basis, etc. d. Create a trail and sell the trail, etc. We may mention that the Government may appoint an advisor at this stage to assist in the process of formulation of detailed property-wise strategy, implementation of the strategy, structuring of the deals in terms of creation of Special Purpose Vehicles, spun-off of units, regulatory requirements, etc. marketing of the transactions and advise Government in the process till the transactions are completed. A detailed scope of work for the advisor may be drafted once the list of properties to be privatised in prepared. Funding Of Tourism Projects Type of Funds The funds required to be raised for projects can be categorised broadly under three heads: Equity, Quasi equity, and Loans. The mix of funding will depend upon the nature of project undertaken, the risk involved, the cash flows envisaged in future, creation of physical assets in order to leverage the project, etc. Source of Fund Most of the Financial Institutes provide all kinds of plain vanilla funds, which are set out above. In addition, they also provide funds such as syndicate loans, Interest rate hedging/swaps, currency hedging loans, etc. in order to match the requirements of the projects. An indicative list of Financials Institutions who may be approached for assistance in investments in Tourism sector are set out below: 1. Domestic Financial Institutes Tourism Finance Corporation of India Infrastructure Leasing Finance of India Industrial Development Bank of India Industrial Finance Corporation of India ICICI Limited Industrial Development Finance Corporation Limited Investment Institutes Life Insurance Corporation of India General Insurance Corporation of India United Trust of India State Financial Institutes Haryana State Industrial Development Corporation Haryana Financial Corporation 2. International Financial Institutes International Monetary Fund World Bank Asian Development Bank International Finance Corporation(only to private sector) KFW Line of Credit International Bank of Reconstruction Overseas Private Investment Corporation Application for Fund There is no standard application form for financing a project as it varies from one Financial Institution to another. A company or entrepreneur, foreign or domestic, seeking to establish a new venture can approach the FI by submitting an Investment Proposal. The proposal submitted to FI for consideration should include the preliminary information as set out in Annexure A. Terms and conditions of Funding Terms A list of terms, which are usually a part of any funding agreement, is set out below: Currencies The currency of the loan/fund to be disbursed by the Lender, payment of interest and repayment of the principal amount to the Lender is specified under this head. Lending Rate Lending rate can be broadly of three types: Floating rate: 6-month London Interbank offered rate (LIBOR) for the US dollar and Japanese Yen and 6-month euro interbank offered rate (EURIBOR) for the euro plus a lending spread. Fixed rate : The cost of Bank’s fixed rate borrowing of US dollars, Japenese yen or Swiss francs plus a lending spread. Resetter : Its is similar to fixed rate loans for the initial period which is tailored to the borrower’s need after a specified period. It is charged as a % per annum on progressive amount of undisbursed loan Commitment Fee balance. Its is a flat percentage fee of the loan amount Front-End Fee As may be determined based on project needs and could comprise of a Maturity grace period and a repayment period with final maturity. Following conversion options would be available subject to the Bank’s Loan Conversion conversion procedures as may be applicable at the time of conversion. Options Transaction Fees Disbursement schedule Prepayment Cancellation Repayment Lending Rate Reset / Payment Dates Currency Conversion: The undisbursed amounts/disbursed amounts in whole or part of the undisbursed balance/disbursed amount of the loan may be converted into the three offered currencies. Interest Rate Conversion: The floating lending rate on the whole or part of the disbursed balance may be converted into a fixed-rate at the prevailing market rate or vice versa for whole or part of the loan's residual maturity. Interest Rate Caps and Collars: A cap or collar on the floating lending rate may be purchased for up to the entire disbursed amount, for the whole or part of the residual maturity. A transaction fees may be charged pertaining to the above referred loan conversion. Amount and timing of loan disbursement are structured as per the project needs. All or part of the disbursed and outstanding loans may be prepaid. Floating rate loans could be prepaid on an interest payment due date without a prepayment premium. Prepayment of floating rate loans on a date other than the interest payment due date will attract payment of a premium based on the difference, if any, between the rate at which the proceeds from the prepayment could be reinvested and Bank’s funding cost for the prepaid amount. Prepayment of fixed rate loans or floating rate loans that involve conversion and a corresponding hedge requiring termination will attract payment of hedge unwinding costs, if any. Borrower may cancel all or a part of the undisbursed balance at any time. Equal principal or annuity repayments. Lending rate for floating rate loans are generally reset every six months on an interest payment date. Interest payment are generally due either on the 1st or 15th day of a calendar month and semiannually thereafter. Conditions The primary objective of introducing conditions while providing loan/funds is to ensure that the proceeds of the loan are used only for the purposes for which the loan was granted and with due attention to considerations of economy and efficiency. Thus, the Lender’s loan documents (e.g., loan agreement, guarantee agreement, where relevant project agreement, etc.) stipulate the loan covenants that are considered necessary to ensure the efficient implementation of, and the full realisation of benefits from, projects financed by Lender. The loan covenants can be divided broadly into two categories: general covenants and special covenants: (i) General Covenants General covenants are standard assurances and undertakings that the Lender requires from all borrowers, guarantors, if any, and executing agencies for projects financed by the loans regardless of the special features of a particular project. General covenants include obligations on the part of the borrower, guarantor, if any, and the executing agency: to carry out the project with diligence and efficiency; to repay the loan; to procure goods and services and engage consultants in accordance with specified procedures; to maintain project records and accounts; to provide local currency funds, facilities, and other resources required for carrying out the project; to submit financial statements/ progress reports; and to establish and maintain adequate auditing arrangements with the provision that the Lender will retain the option to communicate directly with the auditors. (ii) Special Covenants Special covenants are those assurances and undertakings which the Lender considers necessary or desirable to obtain from the borrower, guarantor, if any, and the executing agency for each project, having regard to the special features, identified difficulties, and reference points for monitoring of each project. Special covenants are an important part of the loan documents and are so designed that compliance with these covenants will further ensure the successful implementation of the project, sustainable operation of the facilities, and full realization of its benefits. They also provide a basis for the Lender to monitor project implementation and performance. To facilitate monitoring of compliance, special covenants should indicate, wherever possible, the dates by which compliance is expected of various items therein, on the basis of a realistic assessment of project-specific requirements and the related government policy and procedure. Where special circumstances so warrant, special covenants may be used to require the borrower, if any, or the executing agency/guarantor to undertake necessary action even after completion of project implementation so as to ensure sustainability of project benefits. Compatibility of Loan Covenants with Local Laws Covenants are generally compatible with local laws, administrative practices and procedures, sectoral/subsectoral requirements, and socioeconomic conditions of developing member countries. Interventions required Sr Suggestions Agencies Involved 1 Taxation Rationalisation, reduction and SEB, Finance Department tax holidays. and Government of India 2 Land rates Concession CITCO 3 One window Creation of a body for one stop CITCO and SEB clearance processing 4 Structure Creation of a Tourism Advisory Government of Chandigarh Body Creation of Tourism Finance Deparment and Development Fund CITCO 5 Infrastructure Development of infrastructure CITCO, PWD, Finance and involvement of private Department. sector 6 Marketing Promotion of Chandigarh CITCO Tourism 7 Attracting Private Providing incentives SEB, Ministry of Finance and Sector Participation Government of India, L&DO New Joint Ventures (PSP) CITCO, Finance Department Joint Ventures for existing CITCO projects Privatisation CITCO and Finance Department Annexure A IN\DICATIVE INVESTMENT PROPOSAL OUTLINE There is no standard form for applications. This is an indicative framework providing key heads to be covered in an Investment Proposal to be submitted for funding. 1. Executive Summary Summarise all the important points of the proposal. 2. Lender’s role Propose an equity, debt, or cofinancing arrangement. 3. Background to the project Brief introduction and history of the borrower State the need to undertake the project. Briefly describe the project, including the implementation and operation philosophy. Specify the support obtained from government, lending institutions and investors for the project. State the need for the assistance required from the Lender. 4. The Market Describe the market and marketing arrangements. Include all the following: Basic market orientation: local, national, regional, or export. Projected production volumes, unit prices, sales objectives, and market share of proposed venture. Potential users of products and distribution channels to be used. Present sources of supply for products. Future competition and possibility that market may be satisfied by substitute products. Tariff protection or import restrictions affecting products. price sensitivity market risks Critical factors that determine market potential. 5. Feasibility Study Present a feasibility study establishing the technical, financial, economic, and environmental viability of the project, prepared by a reputable consultant. 5.1Technical feasibility, manpower, resources, and environment: Brief description of the process. Availability of manpower and of infrastructure facilities (transport and communications, power, water, etc.). Breakdown of projected operating costs by major categories of expenditures. Proposed location in relation to markets, infrastructure and manpower. Proposed capacity in comparison with other known competitors. Potential environmental issues and how these issues are addressed. 5.2 Cost Estimates Provide cost estimates for the project, analyzed two ways: major cost category local and foreign currency cost. 5.3 Investment requirements, project financing, and returns: Estimate of total project cost, broken down into land, construction, installed equipment, and working capital, indicating foreign exchange component. Proposed financial structure of venture, indicating expected sources and terms of equity and debt financing. Type of financing (loan, equity, quasi-equity, a combination of financial products, etc.) and amount required from the Lender. Projected financial statement, information on profitability, and return on investment. Critical factors determining profitability. 5.4 Financial and Economic Evaluation Calculate the economic and financial rates of return as well as return on the equity investment. 5.5 Analysis Analyze the risks in implementing and operating the project with the accompanying mitigating measures showing which party will bear the risk and/or pay for the mitigating measures. The risk analysis should be accompanied by a list of proposed insurance coverages for both implementation and operation of the project. 6. Ownership of the project Describe the proposed ownership and management structure of the project. 7. Government support and regulations: Project in context of government economic development and investment program. Specific government incentives and support available to project. Expected contribution of project to economic development. Outline of government regulations on exchange controls and conditions of capital entry and repatriation. 8. Environmental Aspects Provide a site-specific environmental impact assessment report, highlighting environmental impacts and mitigating measures, prepared by an acceptable consulting firm in accordance with Lender’s guidelines. 9. Permitting and Licensing List all permits and clearances required for implementing and operating the project, the issuing authority, and the date of issue or expected issue. 10. Implementation Arrangements Explain the implementation and contractual arrangements for the project, including the construction and supervision methodology. Make sure the followings are included: a bar chart showing major scheduled achievements and completion for each of the major components of the project draft construction contracts sources of possible cost increases and delays Detailed description of liquidated damage provisions and performance bond requirements. Attracting Private Sector Investment In Tourism Sector 1. Taxes 1.1 Rationalisation of taxes Expenditure tax is imposed by National Government while Luxury tax by State Governments. With the Expenditure tax, which is being levied at 10% where room charges are Rs. 3000 or more, being discontinued from 1 June 2003 as per the Union Budget 2003 and no Luxury tax levied, Chandigarh has an advantage over its neighbouring States. Incase in future Expenditure tax or any other tax is levied, then it is preferable to review the effect of total tax while calculating the taxes to be levied on the hotel industry. Moreover these taxes may be charged on the actual room tariff rather on published tariff rate card. 1.2 Other taxes In addition Service tax by Center and Entertainment tax by UT are also being imposed on the hotels. In the Union Budget 2003 services provided by the Hotels are exempted from Service tax. The rates of these taxes, together with expenditure tax and luxury tax, may be decided considering the composite tax (indirect taxes) rate for the hotel industry. The composite tax on hotel industry in India vis-à-vis neighbouring countries is presented in the table below: Composite Tax on Country Hotel Industry (%) India 30* Indonesia 21 Thailand 17 Malaysia 15 Singapore 14 Source: PHDCCI * Estimation includes 10% expenditure tax. 1.3 Sales Tax The Sales tax on beverages and liquor is 12% in the UT, which is moderately higher, compared to other states like Uttar Pradesh, Himachal Pradesh, Punjab, Delhi, etc. Keeping in view the tax structure of other States and especially neighbouring States, Chandigarh may reconsider the sales tax rates for these. 1.4 Transport tax Chandiragh has no transport tax while its neighbouring states Punjab and Haryana are charging the same. A single point tax collection system may be implemented in order to simplify the procedure and ensure smooth movement of tourist inter-states. Further, the tax rate per quarter levied on air-conditioned and non air-conditioned tourist vehicles may be limited by an overall cap amount for the country. 1.5 Power The cost of electricity is a major component in the overall cost structure for a hotel and hence may need to be maintained in line with other comparative States. 1.6 Foreign exchange earnings The UT may consider requesting the Centre for the extension of the time frame of income tax exemption on export earning under section 80HHD of the Income Tax Act 1961. The tourism sector may be granted this extension as like other exporters they too export their services and earn foreign exchange for the country. However, we may mention that it is unlikely that Centre will agree to this request as it has announced phasing out of such incentives. 1.7 Income Tax The UT may also request Centre for providing investments in hotels as well as other industry in the tourism sector with Tax Holiday for a pre-determined period which can be decided in consultation with the various departments and the private sector participants. In order to promote new investments in a particular industry, request for tax holiday for about 5 years for new investments, applicable for 2 year from the current financial year, may be sought. This may likely create positive interest among private sector to invest in these industries with in 2 years to avail the tax holiday. Here too, we may like to mention that the Centre providing such benefits is very unlikely. 2. Investment 2.1 Land rates The Government may consider providing land at concessional rates for construction of hotels and other infrastructure for tourism by private investor. Alternatively, Government may provide land free of cost and acquire stake in the new project constructed on it by private sector through a join venture. The Government has draft a joint venture policy for attracting private sector, a review of which is also incorporated in this report. 2.2 Stamp duty Chandigarh may consider reducing the stamp duty levied especially in the area related to pilgrimages, rural area, etc. 2.3 One window clearance Chandigarh may provide one window clearance to the prospective private sector willing to invest in the UT. This will ensure speedy and efficient investment procedure for the private sector thereby attracting necessary investments. 3. Administrative Structure 3.1 Tourism Advisory Board The UT may strive towards constituting a board or a council comprising members from Tourism Development Corporation, Investment Promotion Board, Industrial Development Corporation, National Tourism Corporation/Department, etc. which will be primarily responsible for co-ordination and monitoring of tourism related activities and projects to ensure proper implementation of Tourism Policy. A detailed suggestion is set out in this report earlier. 3.2 Tourism Development Fund The UT may implement Targeted Funding approach by creating Tourism Development Fund (TDF) which will be recipient of all revenues generated from tourism and tourism related businesses. The Fund will be created by raising low interest loans from multilateral agencies that are actively involved in providing financial assistance to public/private sectors for infrastructure development. A Special Purpose Vehicle may be created where all the funds raised will be parked and a deployed in developing infrastructure to enhance tourism sector. The identification of infrastructure for the development can be done in consultation with other administrative bodies, which are also responsible in developing infrastructure of the state to ensure proper co-ordination between all such bodies. 4. Infrastructure The Government may try to identify areas of strategic importance and involve private sectors in non-strategic areas. Further it may try to segregate core and non-core activities involved in the areas of strategic importance e.g. maintenance of railway platform, maintenance of bus station, etc. and allow private sectors in these activities. Such activities may be provided on a license basis, lease basis, etc. as decided after a proper study of the same. The funds raised by disinvesting of these non-core activities can be utilised in developing infrastructure of the UT. 5. Promotion Chandigarh may plan for an advertising strategy, which will attract tourist from the desired regions and thus benefiting the tourism industry in the UT. This will increase the interest of the private sector in investing in the tourism sector in the UT. The advertising strategy may include amongst others: Shopping festivals, Fun and Fair festivals, Rural art and handicraft festivals, etc. Options for Attracting Private Sector Participation The projects in tourism, like infrastructure projects, too have long gestation period and requires huge capital investment initially. Further, the feasibility of tourism related projects are contingent on development and quality of infrastructure of the region like power, road, railway, water and communications. No single individual agency either the private sector or the Government could finance the sector all alone as the investment required are large and the risk too is relatively higher. Hence part of the load of development of tourism sector may be shared by the inclusion of private sector There are primarily two ways of sharing the responsibility with the private sector: Attracting Private Sector for new projects on all alone basis, Creating Public Private Partnership for new projects, Creating Public Private Partnership for existing projects owned by Government bodies, and Privatisation of existing projects to private sector. A brief note on each method of involving private sector is set out below: 1. Attracting Private Sector for new projects: The private sector may be attracted towards new projects related to tourism like Leisure centers, entertainment parks, theatres, health spa, hotels, etc. by providing incentives for such investments. The list of incentives, applicable period, industry, investment amount, etc may be decided once the type of industry in the tourism sector is identified where Government would like the private sector to accept the responsibility. 2. Creating Public Private Partnership for new projects: The strategy to encourage Public Private Partnership include creating a Tourism Development Finance Company and developing alternative options for partnerships. 2.1 Tourism Development Finance Company A TDFC may be formed with the investment from various state as well as centre owned financial institutions and inviting private sector and international agencies too may be considered. The main role of TDFC will to promote investment in tourism sector by providing long term debt and equity for the same. 2.2 Alternative Models The alternative models for Public Private Partnership for new projects is set out below: Build Operate Transfer (BOO) The private participant invest, executes the project, runs the business and transfer the property to the Government after the agreed span of period is over. Build Operate Lease Transfer (BOLT) The private sector will invest, execute the project, operate the business and then transfer the assets to the Government on completion of agreed span of time. After the hand over of the assets to the Government the private participant will get fixed income by way of lease, which is agreed during the inception. Build Own Operate and Transfer (BOOT) The private sector will invest, execute the project, own the assets created, operate the business and then transfer the assets to the Government on recovery of investments made at a designated rate of return. Until such time the hand over of the assets to the Government is completed, the private participant is responsible for maintenance and operation of the assets. 3. Creating Public Private Partnership for existing projects owned by Government bodies: The private sector may be interested in few existing projects owned by the Government, which the latter may like to share the responsibility of day-today-operation of the business but at the same time would also like to retain stake in the assets. We may like to mention that such properties may be spun-off as a separate entity and private sector may be invited to run the business in following two ways: Formation of Joint Venture by inclusion of a private strategic partner: The private participant will invest funds in the new entity (existing project spun-off) and in return the Government will provide stake in the entity. While the private participant will be primarily be responsible for operating and strategic management decisions, approval of key decisions will required an concurrence from the Government. Issuing license for management control to private parties and retaining ownership with the Government: The private participant neither provides any fund to the Government nor invests funds in the existing project. The ownership of the entity lies with the Government whereas the day-to-day operations are carried out by the private participant for a fixed fee or a revenue sharing model as agreed upon. 4. Privatisation of existing projects to private sector: The step wise strategy for privatisation of the tourism related properties is set out below: 4.1 Setting up a Commission The UT/Center may initiate the process of privatisation by setting up a Privatisation Commission (or Disinvestment Commission) for the purpose of privatisation of Government owned Tourism related properties. The commission will be primarily responsible for reviewing all properties with respect to the Funding Of Tourism Projects Type of Funds The funds required to be raised for projects can be categorised broadly under three heads: Equity, Quasi equity, and Loans. The mix of funding will depend upon the nature of project undertaken, the risk involved, the cash flows envisaged in future, creation of physical assets in order to leverage the project, etc. Source of Fund Most of the Financial Institutes provide all kinds of plain vanilla funds, which are set out above. In addition, they also provide funds such as syndicate loans, Interest rate hedging/swaps, currency hedging loans, etc. in order to match the requirements of the projects. An indicative list of Financials Institutions who may be approached for assistance in investments in Tourism sector are set out below: 1. Domestic Financial Institutes Tourism Finance Corporation of India Infrastructure Leasing Finance of India Industrial Development Bank of India Industrial Finance Corporation of India ICICI Limited Industrial Development Finance Corporation Limited Investment Institutes Life Insurance Corporation of India General Insurance Corporation of India United Trust of India financial status of the properties, priority of privatisation, the strategic importance of the property, etc. 4.2 Identification of Tourism Properties Subsequently, the commission will identify the Government owned properties related to tourism to be disinvested and the approach in which the privatisation process will be adopted. The various strategies, which may be considered for the privatisation, are set out below: a. The related properties may be clubbed together and privatised, b. Create chain of hotels, chain of restaurants, chain of dhabas, etc and privatise each chain, c. Sell certain properties on stand alone basis, etc. d. Create a trail and sell the trail, etc. We may mention that the Government may appoint an advisor at this stage to assist in the process of formulation of detailed property-wise strategy, implementation of the strategy, structuring of the deals in terms of creation of Special Purpose Vehicles, spun-off of units, regulatory requirements, etc. marketing of the transactions and advise Government in the process till the transactions are completed. A detailed scope of work for the advisor may be drafted once the list of properties to be privatised in prepared. State Financial Institutes Haryana State Industrial Development Corporation Haryana Financial Corporation 2. International Financial Institutes International Monetary Fund World Bank Asian Development Bank International Finance Corporation(only to private sector) KFW Line of Credit International Bank of Reconstruction Overseas Private Investment Corporation Application for Fund There is no standard application form for financing a project as it varies from one Financial Institution to another. A company or entrepreneur, foreign or domestic, seeking to establish a new venture can approach the FI by submitting an Investment Proposal. The proposal submitted to FI for consideration should include the preliminary information as set out in Annexure A. Terms and conditions of Funding Terms A list of terms, which are usually a part of any funding agreement, is set out below: Currencies The currency of the loan/fund to be disbursed by the Lender, payment of interest and repayment of the principal amount to the Lender is specified under this head. Lending Rate Lending rate can be broadly of three types: Floating rate: 6-month London Interbank offered rate (LIBOR) for the US dollar and Japanese Yen and 6-month euro interbank offered rate (EURIBOR) for the euro plus a lending spread. Fixed rate : The cost of Bank’s fixed rate borrowing of US dollars, Japenese yen or Swiss francs plus a lending spread. Resetter : Its is similar to fixed rate loans for the initial period which is tailored to the borrower’s need after a specified period. It is charged as a % per annum on progressive amount of undisbursed loan Commitment Fee balance. Its is a flat percentage fee of the loan amount Front-End Fee As may be determined based on project needs and could comprise of a Maturity grace period and a repayment period with final maturity. Following conversion options would be available subject to the Bank’s Loan Conversion conversion procedures as may be applicable at the time of conversion. Options Transaction Fees Disbursement schedule Prepayment Cancellation Repayment Lending Rate Reset / Payment Dates Currency Conversion: The undisbursed amounts/disbursed amounts in whole or part of the undisbursed balance/disbursed amount of the loan may be converted into the three offered currencies. Interest Rate Conversion: The floating lending rate on the whole or part of the disbursed balance may be converted into a fixed-rate at the prevailing market rate or vice versa for whole or part of the loan's residual maturity. Interest Rate Caps and Collars: A cap or collar on the floating lending rate may be purchased for up to the entire disbursed amount, for the whole or part of the residual maturity. A transaction fees may be charged pertaining to the above referred loan conversion. Amount and timing of loan disbursement are structured as per the project needs. All or part of the disbursed and outstanding loans may be prepaid. Floating rate loans could be prepaid on an interest payment due date without a prepayment premium. Prepayment of floating rate loans on a date other than the interest payment due date will attract payment of a premium based on the difference, if any, between the rate at which the proceeds from the prepayment could be reinvested and Bank’s funding cost for the prepaid amount. Prepayment of fixed rate loans or floating rate loans that involve conversion and a corresponding hedge requiring termination will attract payment of hedge unwinding costs, if any. Borrower may cancel all or a part of the undisbursed balance at any time. Equal principal or annuity repayments. Lending rate for floating rate loans are generally reset every six months on an interest payment date. Interest payment are generally due either on the 1st or 15th day of a calendar month and semiannually thereafter. Conditions The primary objective of introducing conditions while providing loan/funds is to ensure that the proceeds of the loan are used only for the purposes for which the loan was granted and with due attention to considerations of economy and efficiency. Thus, the Lender’s loan documents (e.g., loan agreement, guarantee agreement, where relevant project agreement, etc.) stipulate the loan covenants that are considered necessary to ensure the efficient implementation of, and the full realisation of benefits from, projects financed by Lender. The loan covenants can be divided broadly into two categories: general covenants and special covenants: (i) General Covenants General covenants are standard assurances and undertakings that the Lender requires from all borrowers, guarantors, if any, and executing agencies for projects financed by the loans regardless of the special features of a particular project. General covenants include obligations on the part of the borrower, guarantor, if any, and the executing agency: to carry out the project with diligence and efficiency; to repay the loan; to procure goods and services and engage consultants in accordance with specified procedures; to maintain project records and accounts; to provide local currency funds, facilities, and other resources required for carrying out the project; to submit financial statements/ progress reports; and to establish and maintain adequate auditing arrangements with the provision that the Lender will retain the option to communicate directly with the auditors. (ii) Special Covenants Special covenants are those assurances and undertakings which the Lender considers necessary or desirable to obtain from the borrower, guarantor, if any, and the executing agency for each project, having regard to the special features, identified difficulties, and reference points for monitoring of each project. Special covenants are an important part of the loan documents and are so designed that compliance with these covenants will further ensure the successful implementation of the project, sustainable operation of the facilities, and full realization of its benefits. They also provide a basis for the Lender to monitor project implementation and performance. To facilitate monitoring of compliance, special covenants should indicate, wherever possible, the dates by which compliance is expected of various items therein, on the basis of a realistic assessment of project-specific requirements and the related government policy and procedure. Where special circumstances so warrant, special covenants may be used to require the borrower, if any, or the executing agency/guarantor to undertake necessary action even after completion of project implementation so as to ensure sustainability of project benefits. Compatibility of Loan Covenants with Local Laws Covenants are generally compatible with local laws, administrative practices and procedures, sectoral/subsectoral requirements, and socioeconomic conditions of developing member countries. Interventions required Sr Suggestions Agencies Involved 1 Taxation Rationalisation, reduction and SEB, Finance Department tax holidays. and Government of India 2 Land rates Concession CITCO 3 One window Creation of a body for one stop CITCO and SEB clearance processing 4 Structure Creation of a Tourism Advisory Government of Chandigarh Body Creation of Tourism Finance Deparment and Development Fund CITCO 5 Infrastructure Development of infrastructure CITCO, PWD, Finance and involvement of private Department. sector 6 Marketing Promotion of Chandigarh CITCO Tourism 7 Attracting Private Providing incentives SEB, Ministry of Finance and Sector Participation Government of India, L&DO New Joint Ventures (PSP) CITCO, Finance Department Joint Ventures for existing CITCO projects Privatisation CITCO and Finance Department Annexure A IN\DICATIVE INVESTMENT PROPOSAL OUTLINE There is no standard form for applications. This is an indicative framework providing key heads to be covered in an Investment Proposal to be submitted for funding. 1. Executive Summary Summarise all the important points of the proposal. 2. Lender’s role Propose an equity, debt, or cofinancing arrangement. 3. Background to the project Brief introduction and history of the borrower State the need to undertake the project. Briefly describe the project, including the implementation and operation philosophy. Specify the support obtained from government, lending institutions and investors for the project. State the need for the assistance required from the Lender. 4. The Market Describe the market and marketing arrangements. Include all the following: Basic market orientation: local, national, regional, or export. Projected production volumes, unit prices, sales objectives, and market share of proposed venture. Potential users of products and distribution channels to be used. Present sources of supply for products. Future competition and possibility that market may be satisfied by substitute products. Tariff protection or import restrictions affecting products. price sensitivity market risks Critical factors that determine market potential. 5. Feasibility Study Present a feasibility study establishing the technical, financial, economic, and environmental viability of the project, prepared by a reputable consultant. 5.1Technical feasibility, manpower, resources, and environment: Brief description of the process. Availability of manpower and of infrastructure facilities (transport and communications, power, water, etc.). Breakdown of projected operating costs by major categories of expenditures. Proposed location in relation to markets, infrastructure and manpower. Proposed capacity in comparison with other known competitors. Potential environmental issues and how these issues are addressed. 5.2 Cost Estimates Provide cost estimates for the project, analyzed two ways: major cost category local and foreign currency cost. 5.3 Investment requirements, project financing, and returns: Estimate of total project cost, broken down into land, construction, installed equipment, and working capital, indicating foreign exchange component. Proposed financial structure of venture, indicating expected sources and terms of equity and debt financing. Type of financing (loan, equity, quasi-equity, a combination of financial products, etc.) and amount required from the Lender. Projected financial statement, information on profitability, and return on investment. Critical factors determining profitability. 5.4 Financial and Economic Evaluation Calculate the economic and financial rates of return as well as return on the equity investment. 5.5 Analysis Analyze the risks in implementing and operating the project with the accompanying mitigating measures showing which party will bear the risk and/or pay for the mitigating measures. The risk analysis should be accompanied by a list of proposed insurance coverages for both implementation and operation of the project. 6. Ownership of the project Describe the proposed ownership and management structure of the project. 7. Government support and regulations: Project in context of government economic development and investment program. Specific government incentives and support available to project. Expected contribution of project to economic development. Outline of government regulations on exchange controls and conditions of capital entry and repatriation. 8. Environmental Aspects Provide a site-specific environmental impact assessment report, highlighting environmental impacts and mitigating measures, prepared by an acceptable consulting firm in accordance with Lender’s guidelines. 9. Permitting and Licensing List all permits and clearances required for implementing and operating the project, the issuing authority, and the date of issue or expected issue. 10. Implementation Arrangements Explain the implementation and contractual arrangements for the project, including the construction and supervision methodology. Make sure the followings are included: a bar chart showing major scheduled achievements and completion for each of the major components of the project draft construction contracts sources of possible cost increases and delays Detailed description of liquidated damage provisions and performance bond requirements. Prioritisation of selected projects Activity Short term Medium Long term 1-5 years term 5-10 10-20 years years Basic Tourism Infrastructure Projects 1. Setting up a system of coordination between Departments through a “Mission Approach” 2. Assessing the economic impact of tourism in Chandigarh through annual surveys and the use of multipliers 3. Setting up police outposts in the new concept “Cultural/ Tourism Centre” 4. Setting up a system for accreditisation of shops and transportation 5. Creating Tourist/ Cultural center Visitor generating projects 6. Promoting traditional cuisine 7. Horse Race track 8. Amusement Park 9. Linking the sightseeing 10. Conference center to attract business travelers 11. Developing the City Centre 12. Adventure tourism & Wildlife Tourism Job creation Potential of Projects Activity Total Project Direct jobs Indirect cost created jobs created Basic Tourism Infrastructure Projects 1. Setting up a system of coordination between Nil Departments through a “Mission Approach” 2. Assessing the economic impact of tourism in Rs 10 lakhs 50 50 Chandigarh through annual surveys and the use per year of multipliers 3. Setting up police outposts in the new concept Nil 5 20 “Cultural/ Tourism Centre” 4. Setting up a system for accreditisation of shops Nil 5 20 and transportation 5. Creating Tourist/ Cultural center Rs 75 lakhs 350 1000 Visitor generating projects 6. Promoting traditional cuisine Nil 7. Horse Race track Rs40 –50 1000 4600 crores 8. Amusement Park Rs 30 crores 1000 4000 9. Linking the sightseeing Rs 70 lakhs 100 400 10. Conference center to attract business travelers Rs 10 crores 300 1200 11. Developing the City Centre Nil ? 12. Adventure tourism & Wildlife Tourism Nil - Funding of Projects Activity Total Cost to Other project cost Govt funding sources Basic Tourism Infrastructure Projects 1. Setting up a system of coordination between Departments through a “Mission Approach” 2. Assessing the economic impact of tourism in Rs 10 lakhs/ Rs 10 lakhs/ Chandigarh through annual surveys and the use yr year of multipliers 3. Setting up police outposts in the new Nil Nil concept “Cultural/ Tourism Centre” 4. Setting up a system for accreditisation of Negligible Neglibible shops and transportation 5. Creating Tourist/ Cultural center Rs 75 Lakhs Rs 75 lakhs Corporate Visitor generating projects 6. Promoting traditional cuisine Nil 7. Horse Race track Rs 40-50 Variable Pvt Sector crores 8. Amusement Park Rs 30 crores Variable Pvt Sector 9. Linking the sightseeing Rs 70 lakhs Rs 70 lakhs Lease 10. Conference center to attract business Rs 10 crores Rs 10 crores Some travelers Corporate 11. Developing the City Centre 12. Adventure tourism & Wildlife Tourism Nil Economic impact of short term projects Activity Total Potential Multiplier Project Ongoing Effect Cost Revenues Basic Tourism Infrastructure Projects 1. Setting up a system of coordination between Departments through a “Mission Approach” 2. Assessing the economic impact of tourism in Chandigarh through annual surveys and the use of multipliers 3. Setting up police outposts in the new concept “Cultural/ Tourism Centre” 4. Setting up a system for accreditisation of shops and transportation 5. Creating Tourist/ Cultural center Rs 75 lakhs Rs 42 lakhs Rs85 lakhs Visitor generating projects 6. Promoting traditional cuisine Nil Rs 33 lakhs Rs70 lakhs 7. Horse Race track Rs 40-50 Rs 3.13 Rs 6.5 crores crores crores 8. Amusement Park Rs 30 Rs 10 Rs 20 crores crores crores 9. Linking the sightseeing Rs 70 lakhs Rs 27 lakhs Rs 55 lakhs 10. Conference center to attract business Rs 10 Rs 2.6 Rs 5.5 travelers crores crores crores 11. Developing the City Centre 12. Adventure tourism & Wildlife Tourism Name of AnnualGrowthrate Year Year Year Year Year Project Financial Parameters Rate Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 5 6 7 Year 8 9 10 Cultural/ Tourist centres Project Funding-Rs lakhs 75 Funding Yrs 1-5 75 Funding Yrs 6-10 Funding Yrs 10-20 Revenues Rental/ lease- Rs.lakhs 5% 42.4 44.52 46.75 49.08 51.54 54.11 56.82 59.66 62.64 Operational Costs 5% 24 25.2 26.46 27.78 29.17 30.63 32.16 33.77 35.46 Operating profits 18.4 19.32 20.29 21.3 22.37 23.48 24.66 25.89 27.19 Traditional Cuisine Project Funding-Rs lakhs Nil Revenues Visitor numbers 000's 5% 45000 47250 49613 52093 54698 57433 60304 63320 66485 69810 Visitor spends-Rs.lakhs Rs 60/ 5% 27.02 28.37 29.79 31.28 32.85 34.49 36.21 38.02 39.92 41.92 Rental/ lease- Rs.lakhs 5% 6.75 7.09 7.44 7.81 8.20 8.61 9.05 9.50 9.97 10.47 Total Revenues 33.77 35.46 37.23 39.1 41.05 43.1 45.26 47.52 49.9 52.39 Operational Costs-Rs lakhs 5% 24 25.20 26.46 27.78 29.17 30.63 32.16 33.77 35.46 37.23 Operational Profits 9.77 10.26 10.77 11.31 11.88 12.47 13.10 13.75 14.44 15.16 Name of AnnualGrowthrate Year Year Year Year Year Project Financial Parameters Rate Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 5 6 7 Year 8 9 10 Horse Race Track & Club Project Funding-Rs lakhs 5,000 Funding Yrs 1-5 4,000 Funding Yrs 6-10 1,000 Funding Yrs 10-20 Revenues- Rs lakhs Visitor numbers 000's 5% 105.0 110.3 115.8 121.6 127.6 134.0 140.7 Club Memberships 25/yr 600 625 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 Monthly dues 5% 4.2 4.41 4.63 4.86 5.11 5.36 5.63 Corporate Boxes 5% 50 52.50 55.13 57.88 60.78 63.81 67.00 Programme 5% 47.6 49.98 52.48 55.10 57.86 60.75 63.79 Share of tote/ Race charges 5% 111 116.55 122.38 128.50 134.92 141.67 148.75 Gate money-Rs.lakhs 5% 43.5 45.68 47.96 50.36 52.87 55.52 58.29 Rental/ lease- Rs.lakhs 5% 11.25 11.81 12.4 13.02 13.67 14.36 15.08 Total Revenues 600 625 317.6 330.9 345 359.7 375.2 391.5 408.5 Amusement Park Project Funding-Rs lakhs 3,000 Funding Yrs 1-5 3,000 Funding Yrs 6-10 Funding Yrs 10-20 Revenues Visitor numbers 000's 5% 500 525 551.3 578.8 607.8 638.1 670 703.6 738.7 Visitor spends-Rs.lakhs Rs200/ 5% 1000 1050 1103 1158 1216 1276 1340 1407 1477 Total Revenues 1000 1050 1103 1158 1216 1276 1340 1407 1477 Note : These two projects should be tendered out. The above spreadsheets give Operational revenues and visitor numbers for decision making purposes Name of AnnualGrowthrate Year Year Year Year Year Project Financial Parameters Rate Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 5 6 7 Year 8 9 10 Linking the sightseeing Project Funding-Rs lakhs 70 Funding Yrs 1-5 70 Funding Yrs 6-10 Funding Yrs 10-20 Revenues Visitor numbers 000's 550 5% 550 577.5 606.4 636.7 668.5 702 737.1 773.9 812.6 Visitor spends-Rs.lakhs Rs5/ 10% 27.5 31.76 33.35 35.02 36.77 38.61 40.54 42.56 44.69 Operational Costs-Rs lakhs 5% 15 15.75 16.54 17.36 18.23 19.14 20.1 21.11 22.16 Operational Profits 12.5 16.01 16.81 17.65 18.54 19.46 20.44 21.46 22.53 Conference Centre Project Funding-Rs lakhs 1,000 Funding Yrs 1-5 1,000 Funding Yrs 6-10 Funding Yrs 10-20 Revenues Conference visitors 000s 5% 55 57.75 60.64 63.67 66.85 70.2 73.71 77.39 81.26 Visitor spends-Rs.lakhs Rs200/ 5% 110 121.3 127.3 133.7 140.4 147.4 154.8 162.5 170.6 Rentals -Rs lakhs 5% 18 18.9 19.85 20.84 21.88 22.97 24.12 25.33 26.59 Exhibition visitors 000s 5% 60000 63000 66150 69458 72930 76577 80406 84426 88647 Visitor spends-Rs.lakhs Rs 25/ 5% 15 16.54 17.36 18.23 19.14 20.1 21.11 22.16 23.27 Rentals- Rs lakhs 5% 18 18.9 19.85 20.84 21.88 22.97 24.12 25.33 26.59 Social function visitors 000s 5% 50000 52500 55125 57881 60775 63814 67005 70355 73873 Visitor spends-Rs.lakhs Rs200/ 10% 100 115.5 121.3 127.3 133.7 140.4 147.4 154.8 162.5 Total Revenues 261 291.1 305.7 321 337 353.8 371.5 390.1 409.6 Operational Costs-Rs lakhs 5% 112 117.6 123.5 129.7 136.1 142.9 150.1 157.6 165.5 Operational Profits 149 173.5 182.2 191.3 200.9 210.9 221.5 232.5 244.1

Tourism Policy

Tripura Tourism Policy

Tourism Policy 2020 - 25 Shri Biplab Kumar Deb Hon’ble Chief Minister, Tripura MESSAGE I am delighted to learn that the Department of Tourism is bringing out the “Tourism Policy 2020-2025”. I understand that tourism in Tripura has come a long way and it is one of main engines of economic development. The initiative taken by the Department like launching Paryatan Sahayak Prakalp scheme for promoting entrepreneurship, introducing tourist friendly activities like audio guides, guides, eco- friendly vehicles, development of destinations like Chabimura, Unkaoti, Matabari and Neermahal are praiseworthy. The impact of these initiatives will be visible in coming years and will help in transforming Tripura as one the most important tourist destination in India. I hope that the Department will continue to play the perfect host to tourists from around the world by presenting the best we have as a destination and also at the same time preserving the tradition, culture, values and the interest of the people of Tripura. I hope that the Tourism Policy will be a guiding document for all the stakeholders to promote Tripura as a premier tourist destination. Wishing all success. Biplab Kumar Deb Shri Pranajit Singha Roy Hon’ble Minister, Tourism, Government of Tripura MESSAGE The tourism sector in Tripura has been growing consistently with lot of innovative activities being undertaken. However it has been observed that this growth has been in an unorganised manner with all the stakeholders of this sector working independently. It has been felt that all these stakeholders have to be brought together so that the vision of Tripura being a world class tourist destination is realised. This policy formulation is one of the steps towards achieving this vision. Tourism in Tripura began very small and has been growing consistency. Today the state attracts more than 5 lakh domestic and foreign tourist every year and has created a mark for itself on the tourism map of the country. I expect the tourism sector to grow more. This policy aims at facilitating this growth and at the same time ensuring that this growth in accordance with the traditional and cultural values of the state. The Government also aims to provide an environment conducive to the growth of the tourism sector so that all the stakeholders especially private investors are encouraged. This policy document also aims to provide this framework of conducive working environment. The policy document has been prepared after consultation with various stakeholders as at various stages and it focuses on identifying thrust areas for tourism in the State, the strategy to be adopted to make Tripura a world class destination, encouraging private partnerships, boosting local entrepreneurship and local community involvement in promoting tourism and all the same preserving the environment, heritage and culture of the state. I believe that this policy will strengthen the tourism sector of the State and will contribute not only for development of tourism but in overall economic development of the State. Pranajit Singha Roy Tourism Policy of Tripura 1. Preamble Global Tourism Scenario: A large number of people are travelling across the world- be it for work, pleasure or for enjoying the natural beauty or to understand the different cultures. As one of the most prominent human activities with positive outcomes, Tourism facilitates understanding of history, culture and traditions of our nation as well as of other countries. It promotes national integration, universal brotherhood and social integration. It offers opportunities for people to people exchange, generating employment opportunities, earning foreign exchange and this raising living standards. According to the annual analysis quantifying the global economic and employment impact of travel and tourism in 185 countries, World Travel & Tourism Council’s (WTTC) research reveals that the sector has grown at 3.9% during 2018. It contributed to $8.8 trillion to the global economy and accounted for 319 million jobs, equivalent to one in every ten jobs. Tourism Scenario in India Tourism sector is one of the largest employment generators in India and plays a very significant role in promoting inclusive growth of the less-advanced sections of the society. According to India Tourism Statistics 2019 published by Ministry of Tourism, Govt. of India, Foreign Tourist Arrivals in India in 2018was 10.56 million and witnessed annual growth of 5.2%. The estimated Foreign Exchange Earnings from tourism during 2018 was Rs.1, 94,892 Cr with annual growth rate of 9.6%1.Domestic tourist visits to all States and UTs in 2018 was 1854.9 Million registering annual growth rate of 11.9%. The Indian tourism industry is responsible for creating 23 million direct jobs (or 5.5% of total jobs in India) and 36.6 million direct and indirect jobs (or 8.7% of total jobs in India). Tourism Scenario in Tripura: Tripura is a hilly North-Eastern State of India blessed with natural rich topography, unique geographical location with tropic of cancer passing through its heart. The State, an abode of rich floral and faunal biodiversity, unique landscapes and moderate climate throughout the year has immense potential for tourism .Peaceful co-existence of nineteen indigenous tribes along with Bengali and Manipuri communities in the State, their diverse cultural streams and faiths, traditional art, music and festivals, beautiful handloom and handicrafts constitute irresistible charm as a tourist destination. It has spellbound rock cut sculptures of archaeological significance, Buddhist pilgrimage sites and the royal palaces that add to the charm. During 2018-19, total 5,29,879 tourists visited Tripura including 1,12,955 foreign tourists. 1India Tourism Statistics 2019; Ministry of Tourism, Govt. of India The bulk of foreign tourists are from Bangladesh followed by tourists from USA, Canada and UK. Though in small numbers, tourists from Serbia, Sweden, Hungary and New Zealand visited Tripura in 2018-19. Tourist arrival registered 10% annual growth during 2018-19. Evolution of Tourism sector in Tripura: Tourism has been declared as an Industry in Tripura way back in1987. Realizing the potential of Tourism in the socio-economic development of the State, the State Government has set up Tripura Tourism Development Corporation Limited in 2008 for professional management and giving further impetus to tourism sector in the State. The Corporation has been registered in 2009 and since it’s functioning the revenue generation is continuously increasing indicating the opportunity for further expansion of this sector. Earlier Tourism Department was part of Information and Cultural Affairs Department but in 2013 a separate Tourism Directorate has been set up and it acts as an administrative department for the Tourism Corporation. People’s outlook towards tourism in the state: The sociable, art loving, ritualistic and festive character of local people is very conducive for tourism development in the State. People’s outlook towards tourism is positive and full of enthusiasm as this has potential for socio-economic development of the local communities. In fact, community participation in tourism development will be vital for success of tourism in Tripura. 2. Need for Tourism Policy in Tripura Tourism continued to develop in an unorganised manner with various departments engaged in tourism development and facilitation but working in isolation with each other. Thus, a need for a joint and collaborative approach has been felt which would address tourism in a holistic manner through an integrated approach. There is an urgent need to consolidate all existing missions and plans, and together with strong participation of the tourism stakeholders to develop Tripura as preferred tourist destination. Considering ever growing and changing tourism industry, the policy shall provide guidance for bringing sustainability through inclusive growth, enhancing capacities of tourism stakeholders as well as for developing regulatory frameworks, which shall ensure quality experience for visitors to the State. At this stage of tourism development, the visitors’ perspectives also need to be factored in. Increasingly people are looking for authentic and distinctive experiences. Additionally, need to conserve the culture and nature has gained even more importance. This requires a comprehensive guiding document in the form of a policy for shaping Tripura’s tourism sector, which has been a long felt need in the state. 3. Vision To promote sustainable tourism in Tripura, with emphasis on enhancing tourist experience, placing Tripura on tourism map of the world as one of the leading tourist destinations and also enabling economic and social development by linking tourism with the livelihood opportunities for local communities. 4. Mission a. To make Tripura nationally and internationally acclaimed all-season Tourist destination. b. To provide world class amenities and facilities to the tourists at all destinations and also provide well managed public amenities on the highways. c. To highlight rich culture, heritage, wildlife, bio-diversity so as to provide unique experience of unexploited wonderland to the tourists. d. To disseminate Tripura’s rich history, cultural and traditional aspects related to the ancient kingdom. e. To facilitate involvement of private sector in establishment and management of tourism infrastructure. f. To encourage local communities in management of tourist destinations as well as hosting activities like home-stay. g. To generate employment opportunities for the local communities in sectors directly and indirectly linked with the tourism. 5. Guiding Principles The tourism policy will be based on the following guiding principles: a. Promotion of religious tourism based by developing places of worship of all faiths. b. To promote eco-tourism in the State in collaboration with the Forest Department. c. Undertake measures to provide best experience to the tourists in terms of information, logistics amenities, security and hospitality. d. Establish active and coordinated participation of Government departments, voluntary organizations, the local community and other stakeholders of tourism sector. e. Set up an institutional mechanism to promote private investment. f. To create enabling framework for public-private partnerships in developing tourism products, projects and services. 6. Validity period of Policy This policy shall remain in force for five years from the date of its issuance and projects started/established/ expanded operationally during such period shall qualify for benefits/exemption/concessions under the provision of this Policy. However, tourism projects established / expanded before the issuance of this policy shall be dealt with as per the provisions of the then prevailing policy. 7. Strategy The following will be the strategy to be adopted to realise the vision of development of Tourism in Tripura: A) Tourism Infrastructure Optimization: The development of infrastructure is key for promoting tourism in the State. This will be taken up in the following ways. i. Destination and Basic Infrastructure Development: a. Destination development will be taken up through Central Govt and State Govt schemes. For each destination, a master plan will be developed, so that comprehensive development of amenities and facilities is ensured. While planning the tourism destinations, Global Sustainable Tourism Council (GSTC) Criteria will be adhered by the Tourism Department, which is aimed to bring all stakeholders together to achieve sustainable tourism. GSTC Criteria serve as the global baseline standards for sustainability in travel and tourism. They are the result of a worldwide effort to develop a common language about sustainability in tourism. They are arranged in four pillars listed as sustainable management, Socio economic impacts, Cultural impacts and Environmental impacts (including consumption of resources, reducing pollution and conserving biodiversity and landscapes). b. Department of Tourism (DoT) will collaborate with State Govt. Departments like Urban Development, PWD, Transport, Tripura State Electricity Corporation amongst others for continuous improvement and maintenance of basic infrastructure such as roads, drinking water, power, hygiene, transport, and solid waste management. c. Priority areas will include setting up of hotels, restaurants, spas and resorts, tourist centres, parking areas, entertainment centres, amusement parks, ropeways, golf course, standardized budget accommodation etc. d. New tourism destinations across the State will be identified and prioritized for development. Every year 1-2 destinations will be focused so that they can be developed in all respects for the tourists. e. Efforts to include Tourism related aspects in action plan of all departments, particularly Forest, Handloom and Handicrafts, Information and Cultural Affairs for promotion of fairs and festivals of Tripura as listed in Annexure-1,Public Works Department, Industry (for tea tourism), Horticulture and other Departments of the State for holistic development. f. Highest priority will be accorded to conservation and preservation of natural resources and beauty at eco-tourism destinations. ii. Development of Way Side Amenities a. Way side amenities will include setting up cafeteria, souvenir shop, parking facility, toilet complex etc on the major roads leading to tourist destinations. b. The way side amenities will be developed on the government land along the National / State High ways or near the tourist locations, or developed in private land by the interested entrepreneur. c. All way side amenities to carry out the brand name of Tripura Tourism. d. In case of government land, the tourism department will ensure that land is allotted / leased to the Tourism Department with a provision to be managed by the Tripura Tourism Development Corporation Limited (TTDCL) and TTDCL will do the bid management for developing the way side amenities in that location. The land leasing will be taken up as per the guidelines formulated by the State Government from time to time. e. In case of private land, the owner of the land or any other person after seeking due permission or arrangement with the owner of the land, can propose to set up way side amenities. The proposal will be given to Tourism Department, which will examine and provide approval. In this case the developer will require to pay a royalty or commission to State Government, as per the procedure laid down. f. Way side amenities will be promoted under the Paryatan Sahayak Prakalp (Details included in Annexure II) scheme launched by Department of Tourism. iii. Development of Tourist Circuits a. Tourist Circuits linking Eco-Tourism, religious and entertainment places of interests to the tourist will be designed and developed. b. Based on the profile of the tourists i.e. domestic and foreign, separate tourist packages will be developed and marketed in the suitable forums. c. Special efforts will be made to develop international tourist circuit and promote in Bangladesh. The places involved will be Moynamoti in Bangladesh along with Pilak and Boxanagar in Tripura that can be developed as archaeological / Buddhist tourist circuits. d. Similarly, there are 6 Shaktipeethas in Bangladesh which can be linked with Tripura Sundari Shaktipeetha in Tripura and developed into an international religious circuit. e. Along these circuit routes, Home stay will be promoted to provide lifestyle and cultural experience of Tripura to the tourists. B) Improving Connectivity: i. Efforts would be taken to ensure direct flights from major cities to Agartala. ii. Operationalisation of Kailashahar Airport, will help to reach Unakoti and Jampui Hills tourists destinations conveniently. iii. There are 22 helipads in Tripura. Therefore, helicopter tourism can be promoted and “Tripura Hawai Darshan” will be started by using the services of Pawan Hans every weekend. iv. The Tourism Department will also work with the Indian Railways and IRCTC for providing affordable tourist packages. v. Tourism Department will work with the NHAI, PWD Department and Rural Development department to improve the connectivity to Tourist Destinations on priority. vi. The Tourism Department in coordination with the concerned departments of the State, will take steps to ensure proper hygienic conditions and to prevent the exploitation of tourists on national and state highways and at tourist places. vii. Police and Highway Patrol to be ensured on all major state and national highways connecting major tourism destinations in co-ordination with Home Department and Highway Authorities C) Human Resource Development: i. In service sector like tourism, availability of skilled staff is essential for delivery of hospitality services professionally. The Government will invest in human resource development so that the managerial and technical skill is made available with the State. Tourism Department will facilitate the operationalisation of Hotel Management Institute at Anandnagar at the earliest ii. All the personnel directly and indirectly engaged in the tourism sector will be trained in hospitality related aspects with assistance from National level apex institutes-like IITM, IIFM, IHMs, etc. DoT shall put emphasis on youth, women, under privileged and disadvantaged sections of the society. Skill trainings and Capacity Building workshops shall be organized to make them employable in the tourism sector. iii. Professional guides will be trained, certified and deployed at tourist locations and at arrival points. iv. Service related training will be provided periodically to all the registered home stay owners, restaurant staff and hoteliers and their staff so that the tourists enjoy warm hospitality during their stay in the State. v. Feedback and 3rd Party Skill Assessment of Trainings provided and Trainees after completion of trainings shall be carried out. vi. DoT will also encourage Hoteliers/Travel Operators/Tour Agents to induct trained and certified guides/workforce for better absorption in the tourism sector. vii. A pool of consultants / experts shall be empanelled to provide necessary training like general etiquettes, English speaking and other languages, cooking, nature guides, heritage guides, resort operations etc as per the demand of the industry. viii. Convergence with Central government schemes like Hunar se Rozgar Yojana of Ministry of Tourism and other ministries shall be ensured. ix. Licensing and certification of tour guides shall be ensured to standardize their services and accreditation of travel agents shall be promoted x. Tourism sector institutions of the State shall be encouraged to include sustainable development strategies as part of their curriculum. xi. Emphasis on capacity building of Local Communities: a. Special incentive scheme “Paryatan Sahayak Prakalp” has been adopted to promote entrepreneurship and people participation in development of tourism related infrastructure & services in Tripura, where subsidised interest loans upto Rs. 5 Lakhs are given to youths. b. Transparent guidelines and standard procedures will be laid down to allow local communities to participate in the management of the tourist destinations and services. c. Active participation of local bodies will be ensured by sensitizing them towards tourism. d. In promoting the local cuisine, costume, art, handicraft and local heritage etc, involvement of local communities is crucial and it will be encouraged. e. Retail outlets for local products, arts, crafts, cuisine, etc will be encouraged wherever feasible f. Community kitchens and cluster of public conveniences at rural locations will be encouraged largely through private entrepreneurs/SHGs D) Marketing & Promotion: i. Social media and digital media will be used widely for marketing the tourist destinations. This will be key for advertisement and promotion strategy. ii. Along with this, destination and package wise new brochures, posters will be printed and short films on destinations will be developed. iii. One key area for marketing and promotion is the Information centres situated in airport, railway station and integrated check posts. The existing information centers will be upgraded and new such information centers will be planned in major airports and railways stations. iv. The participation in leading national and international tourism fairs will be taken up strategically so as to market the tourist destinations in a better way. v. Familiarization tours of the leading tour operators of the country and overseas will be taken up in major tourist destinations so that they are marketed well in the State. vi. Road shows in key national and international markets will be taken up to promote the tourist destinations vii. Signage’s of the international class will be installed on the national, state and at the important tourist highways and stations. viii. Destination Management Organizations (DMO) will be promoted locally, first at Agartala for promoting destinations in concerted manner for standardization of services. DMOs are non-government professional body that market a destination by attracting right quantum of tourists and synergizes activities at local tourist destinations. Responsibilities of a DMO include: • Facilitate reservations for villas, resorts, hotels, homestays • Provide travel management and guides • Act as local partners for group and event organizers • Acts as receptive agents for travel agents, tour operators • Training and capacity building activities for local communities • Tourism products and business development ix. DoT shall undertake initiatives to develop Coffee table books, Documentaries and knowledge material for tourists. These will focus on diversity of Tripura such as its flora, fauna, heritage, festivals and local culture covering tourism destinations x. A 5 year calendar of events across Tripura will be developed including 5 signature events that will be organized annually. Indigenous products will be promoted as part of the event calendar xi. The advertisement will be taken up by the Tripura Tourism Development Corporation Limited (TTDCL) as accordingly approved by the board of TTDCL from time to time. xii. Emphasis towards attracting International Tourists: It has been observed that international tourists prefer visiting places with rich cultural heritage, eco-friendly locations and the locations that offer them unique experience. As Tripura has all these types of locations, steps should be taken to attract international tourists. As the first step to attract international tourists, a detailed strategy will be created for top 5 visiting countries to catalyse the demand of inbound tourism including strategic link up with overseas tourism boards. a. Making linkages with the international circuits of religious and cultural significance and marketing the tourist destinations. b. Efforts will be taken to ensure travel, accommodation bookings and transit seamless and comfortable to the tourists. c. All efforts will be made to access national as well international tourist markets for marketing, branding, promotion of local Tourism Products. d. Comprehensive feedback mechanism of tourist experience shall be developed. E) Attracting Private Investments: i. To encourage establishment of tourism projects through private investment, land bank at suitable locations will be identified and created by the tourism department. ii. As tourism has been accorded the status of Industry, the, Incentives, Subsidies/Concessions will be made available to augment the establishment of various tourism facilities like hotels and resorts in the State, like to any other industry. iii. Private transport operators will be linked to tourism areas and encouraged to provide quality transport services. iv. To encourage MICE (Meetings, Incentives, Conferences and Exhibitions) Tourism in the State, establishment and management of convention centres with private investment will be promoted. v. To provide quality accommodation to tourists in the state, establishment of star category hotels with private investment will be encouraged. F) Safety & Security i. A disaster management plan will be created for major tourist destinations to brace for any eventuality. A dedicated helpline number will be launched exclusively for the tourists. ii. To provide safeguard for tourist, tourist police / private security persons will be deployed at various locations. An assessment will be made regarding the requirement of the police personnel / private security guards and they will be sensitised accordingly. iii. Tourism Department shall liaison with mobile operators to ensure efficient connectivity for all tourism destinations in the state especially far-flung areas iv. Tourists will be provided with information with the better use of information technology and communication mediums. Through mobile based applications they will be provided tourism information. v. Tourist destinations will be equipped with modern telecommunication facilities and ICT. vi. Enabling appropriate accessibility for physically challenged will be promoted at key tourist destinations. 8. Thrust Areas of Tourism in Tripura Eco Tourism Eco-Tourism is a new concept, developed around the idea of travelling to places of natural beauty, moving around and staying at places bestowed with nature for few days. It involves participation of local communities in overall economic development of area, learning environment friendly way of life and support conservation efforts while observing nature and wildlife. Tripura has immense scope for eco-tourism. The State is virtually free from industrial pollution. Its green forests, blue hills, enchanting rivers are basis on which eco- friendly tourism can be developed through: a. Tripura is an ideal place for developing eco-tourism activities like jungle safaris, trekking, rock climbing, forest trails, nature walks, angling, camping etc. All these activities are to be conducted in a manner that promotes awareness of the environment and helps maintain the ecological balance. b. Wildlife Tourism is an integral part of Eco Tourism. At present there are 04 (four) Sanctuaries, 02 (two) National Parks. Department of Toursim proposes to work actively with the Wildlife Wing of the Forest Deptt. to further develop and improve wildlife parks/zoos, bird watching towers and other public utility services for the facility of the tourists. Initiatives shall be taken in collaboration with the Forest Department to preserve/protect these areas from mass tourism flows and development. c. Development of Lakes and wetlands is also part of eco-tourism. The department will take steps in coordination with the Forest Department to maintain and enhance their beauty by undertaking development in an integrated manner. d. Policy for Eco-tourism in Forest & Wildlife areas has been outlined by Government of India. It will be followed as and where applicable. e. Forest Department will also make an endeavour to declare some areas for eco-friendly recreation. f. Creation of infrastructural facilities like good quality tents, cottages-on-stilts with provisions for ethnic food and other logistics will be taken up in the eco tourism sites along with river cruise, water sports etc. g. Dumbur lake will be developed into world class destination with the financial assistance of the Central Government / Externally Aided Project in order to develop activities like water sports, angling, bird watching, setting up of house boats, development of artificial beaches etc. h. Nature Camps, Eco-friendly accommodation, trekking and nature walks, visitor interpretation centers amongst others shall be promoted. i. Guides and naturalists shall be trained and certified in coordination with the Forest Department. j. TTDCL will conduct feasibility study to create cycle trails near selected rivers, natural parks and sanctuaries to discover natural and cultural aspects of the region. k. TTDCL will create interpretation center to promote edutainment in forest sector. Adventure Tourism: a. There is a need to make comprehensive adventure tourism promotion plan for the State by laying down the regulatory framework for enforcement of safety standards.TTDCL shall set out eligibility criteria for entities aspiring to enter the Adventure Tourism segment to safeguard the tourists from the perils of the various adventure tourism activities b. For the promotion of adventure sports, the TTDCL will identify the various adventure sports activities that can be taken up at different location and they will be developed in public private partnership mode. As the first step, TTDCL will work in close coordination with Adventure Tour Operators & Associations to frame resource mapping for developing potential adventure tourism activities. c. To attract private investment in Adventure tourism, TTDCL can offer land on lease or license. Procedure to offer the land on lease shall be followed in accordance with the guidelines issued by the State Government from time to time. d. As training and safety standards are key to adventure sports, training on different aspects of the adventure sports to the youths, will be facilitated by TTDCL. e. TTDCL will make provision for quality equipment needed for adventure activities. These shall be made available in the nearest tourism department office. f. TTDCL will market and promote adventure destinations and expeditions in domestic and international platforms. Spiritual Tourism: a. A detailed infra-gap assessment shall be carried out at major pilgrimage destinations to address the key infrastructure issues in collaboration with Temple Trusts. b. Service Level Agreements for maintaining cleanliness and hygiene with professional agencies in the domain shall be undertaken. c. Funding from CSR shall also be explored for solid waste management, provisioning of tourist amenities etc at prominent pilgrimage destinations. d. Smart solutions will be promoted in collaboration with Temple Trusts to implement services like Wi-Fi, CCTV cameras, display screens, Prasad vending cash cards, visitor management amongst others. e. With the help of local bodies regular cleanliness drives shall be ensured at religious destinations. f. TTDCL shall create Tourist Facilitation Centres to enhance tourists experience at religious destinations. These centres shall ensure centralized booking facilities, tourist information, food etc. g. Tourism Department plans to develop Tripura Sundari Matabari Temple as world class tourist destination in consultation with the Mandir Trust.Along with tourist amenities, Tourism Department will also develop Ropeway from Udaipur Railway Station upto Matabari temple, in PPP mode. This ropeway will become a major tourist attraction. h. Tourism department in collaboration with other States, will market Tripura Sundari Temple as part of shaktipeeth circuit. These efforts will be especially with Assam, so that all tourist visiting Kamakhya can also visit Tripura Sundari temple. i. An annual seven days Kharchi Mela at Old Agartala Chaturdas temple during the month of July has come to be as known as Mahamillan utsav of the tribal & non-tribal, where lakhs of people and Sadhus congregate. This shall be highlighted in publicity campaigns in domestic tourist circuits with an appropriate tagline giving forceful punch to spiritual tourism. j. The Buddhist circuit in Tripura comprising Benuban Vihar, Mahamuni and Nabincharra will be promoted, especially in South East Asia to attract tourists. TTDCL will conduct road shows in the South East Asian countries to promote Buddhist Tourism. k. With similar focus, the centres of other faiths also will be developed and promoted in the relevant market segments. Ethnic Tourism: a. Tripura is a unique in it’s cultural and ethnic diversity. The State is a home land to 19 ethnic tribes and groups, each having its own cultural heritage, life customs, religious beliefs, language, food habits, folk songs and dances which are rich and varied. b. TTDCL shall conduct Social Impact Assessment in collaboration with the Department of Tribal Welfare and Department of Forest for development of eco-ethnic tourism activities in due consultation with representatives from tribal communities. This will ascertain their willingness to participate in eco-ethnic tourism activities. c. A detailed resource mapping study shall be undertaken by analyzing the market potential of eco ethnic tourism d. Only activities and facilities having least impact on the natural resources and the tribal culture shall be permitted. e. Marketing strategies shall be developed for promotion of eco ethnic tourism activities based on sound market research and segmentation analysis and make wide use of electronic, print and cyber media. f. Destinations thus identified shall be developed in accordance with the carrying capacity of the region, and also ensured that the activities causes minimal disturbance to the social diaspora and natural ecosystem g. Tourism infrastructure for promoting eco ethnic tourism activities shall be environment friendly, low impact aesthetic architecture, including solar energy, waste recycling, rainwater harvesting, natural cross-ventilation and proper sewage disposal and merging with the surrounding habitat. h. TTDCL shall work in close coordination with Tripura Handloom & Handicrafts Development Corporation to promote the tribal products i. Accreditations like Craft Mark, Geographical Indication (GI) shall be promoted for the products developed by the tribal people, to adhere to the principals of fair trade. j. TTDCL will identify villages to develop the traditional architecture and tourism related infrastructure. k. TTDCL will also identify in the existing tourist locations and also new locations to provide the experience of local cuisine, handloom and handicrafts, art and dance forms. Efforts will be undertaken to form Village tourism Committees (VTC) in such tourist locations for effective management of tourism enterprises. SHGs of villages shall be promoted to work as supporting VTCs. l. appropriate synergies would be ensured with financial institutions to provide funds for renovating the rural homes so as to ensure attractive, clean and comfortable stay of visiting tourists. m. Some of the identified activities for promotion under eco-ethnic theme are as under:  Rural Immersion Programmes including festivals and folklore  Rural Homestays  Local cuisine  Handicraft development  Participation in tribal rituals  Tribal Sports  Village walks and Jungle Treks, Bird watching etc. Film Tourism: a. The objective will be to project and establish, Tripura as an ideal shooting destination, and for this an exhaustive publicity campaign shall be taken up by the tourism department. b. Film Tourism is an area which can be explored in Tripura, as till date no major films were shooted here. To promote film tourism, the producers need to be given incentives so that they find a reason to do shooting here. c. Also film producers face various difficulties in co-ordinating with different departments while asking permission for local level shooting. Tourism Department will co-ordinate with these departments to obtain the legal mandatory permissions needed for film producers. This service can be extended to the concerned producer company on best effort basis d. It will also be required to declare Director Tourism as the sole authority for granting all type of permissions related to film shootings and the fee thus be collected by the Tourism department could be further remitted to the concerned departments. e. In addition to this the department will invite investment from private parties for setting up of the film cities, studios and hiring of filming equipment etc. for which govt. land could be provided on PPP basis. f. Organize familiarization tours for major production houses in India and across the world for key tourist destinations in Tripura. g. To ensure safety and security to the film makers a separate film shooting wing will be formed in collaboration with the Home Department and respective District Tourism Officers on the concerned area. h. TTDCL shall lease out various instruments available for film shooting in close coordination with other departments like Education, Culture, amongst others. i. TTDCL in consultation with the production houses will retain film shooting sets/structures which can have touristic value. Tea & Golf Tourism: a. There are 54 Tea Estates in Tripura. Coordination with the management of the tea gardens can effectively do a lot in promoting tea tourism in the State. Tourism Department will engage and persuade some of the willing tea gardens to be a partner in the tea tourism packages. The quantum of land allowed and activities permitted shall be as per the provisions of TLR& LR Act as amended from time to time. b. Traditional houses in Tea Estates could be converted into home stays wherein the tourists could enjoy the beauty right from tea plantations upto tea packaging. Many of these tea gardens can be developed to have golf courses. c. TTDCL will also organise Tea Festivals in consultation with the Tea Board. Wellness Tourism: a. A detailed market plan shall be developed to promote medical & wellness tourism in association with concerned stakeholders including reputed medical institutions and practitioners, medical service providers, amongst others. b. Focus would be towards offering medical as well as wellness facilities to the rural/sub- urban regions of the State by developing seamless connectivity to the destinations. c. TTDCL shall also include these centres in it packages and promote them at national and international platforms like travel marts, road shows etc. d. Apart from this Tourism Department also proposes to develop ayurvedic spa /health resorts in association with the private sector at various locations in the State. e. Training the youth in Panchkarma and other therapies will also be undertaken by tourism department through concerned departments. Heritage Tourism: a. Heritage zones will be earmarked around site like Unakoti, Udaipur, Pilak, Baxanagar, etc and accordingly master plans will be developed for comprehensive tourism development of the region. To improve the maintenance of these destinations efforts will be taken to create ownership among locals. Feasibility of creating heritage trails will be also considered. b. Greater coordination with Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) will be ensured and all efforts will be taken to make “UNAKOTI”- a World Heritage Site. c. To increase length of stay of tourists’ development of tourist villages near existing heritage attractions will be encouraged by engaging local communities. Border Tourism: a. TTDCL will encourage tourism activities along the bordering areas of the state. Intensive marketing and promotional activities will be adopted to increase tourist visits from neighbouring states. b. Access to infrastructure to these destinations shall be developed by collaborating with other state agencies to enable smooth commute. Arts, Crafts and Souvenirs: a. Promotion of local art and culture, generation of income and employment as it is a major component of tourism policy. The tourism department will endeavour to encourage the development of souvenir industry linked to local crafts, events and places which would promote a distinctive image of the State both within and outside the State. The private sector will also be encouraged to patronize and promote local folk, culture and crafts for the visiting tourists. b. Development of souvenir industry including standardised packaging is of utmost importance for which leading institutions and voluntary organisations in the country like NID, NIFT, IIPD, NCDPD etc will be actively engaged. 9. Role of Tripura Tourism Development Corporation Ltd: The role of Tripura Tourism Development Corporation Ltd (TTDCL) for implementation of tourism policy is important. The role of the Corporation will be as follows; i. While providing tourism services, the TTDCL shall play a crucial role in establishment, expansion, marketing and advertisement of tourism related infrastructure and services. ii. TTDCL shall identify new areas for development of Tourism destinations and facilities through public and private investment. iii. TTDCL shall focus on management of core tourist services, and as per the need will be allowed to hand over its units to private sector for operation under management agreement or on a long-term lease. iv. To resolve issues related to tourism promotion, management and operations, effective steps shall be taken up in co-ordination with stakeholders of tourism industry. v. Tourism projects shall be established and appropriate support to investors to invest in new undeveloped areas with tourism potential shall be streamlined. vi. As and when required TTDCL can expand its units and develop new areas of tourism through profits realized. vii. TTDCL shall take up up-gradation and maintenance of tourist lodges and other assets regularly to provide better facilities to the tourists. viii. TTDCL shall set up a Project Monitoring Unit (PMU) for taking up intense promotional activities, attracting private investments, investor facilitation, providing incentives and subsidies to investors. 10. Tourism Projects The following activities will be treated as tourism projects to avail various facilities and subsidies as applicable under the Schemes of the State and Central Governments. The definitions of these projects will be updated as per the guidelines issued by Ministry of Tourism, Government of India and Department of Tourism, Government of Tripura, from time to time: • Hotel (Star, Deluxe and Standard Class). • Health Farm/Resort/Health and Wellness Resort. • Resort, Camping Site and Fixed tenting units. • Wayside Amenities. • Heritage Hotel. • Facilities for Meetings, Incentives, Conferences and Exhibitions (MICE). • Museum/Aquarium/Theme Parks. • Bed and Breakfast /Home Stay Units. • Golf Course. • Rope way. • Water Park and Water Sports. • Amusement Park. • Adventure tourism. • Cruise Tourism and House Boats. • Film studio and development of infrastructure and installation of equipment for film making. • Sound and light show/ Laser show. • Other activities related to tourism as notified by Tourism Department of Central / State Government, from time to time. 11. Investor Facilitation and Promoting Private partnerships i. Tripura Tourism Development Corporation Limited (TTDCL) shall function as the nodal agency for investor facilitation under this policy. ii. The engagement of private partners for suitable tourism projects will be according to the guidelines issued by the State Government from time to time. iii. For Investment Promotion in Tourism, Corporation shall work in coordination with Directorate of Industries and Tripura Industrial Development Corporation also to provide permissions, incentives and subsidies for the enterprises and projects in Tourism sector. iv. At State level, for implementation of Investment promotion activities, for granting of permissions / registration / no objections / licenses to Investor of establishment of Tourism Projects, Deputy Managing Director, TTDCL shall be nominated as the single point of contact. v. The Deputy MD shall get resolved all such Investment related proposals in tourism sector through the committees constituted at State and District level and coordinate with various departments for necessary approvals. vi. Private projects where forest/revenue clearances are needed will be dealt on priority within a specified time not exceeding 30 days. 12. Planning for Future Developments Tourism shall plan holistically for all its future tourism developments, in order to achieve the same the following practices shall be adopted: i. Tourism Roadmap The department shall undertake the exercise to create a long-term tourism roadmap of the state. In doing so TTDCL shall engage consultants, as required, to prepare a comprehensive tourism roadmap covering the detailed resource mapping exercises of potential and new tourism destinations. Thus, TTDCL can prioritize these destinations and make action plans for implementation. TTDCL shall also engage experienced operations/experts in various domains to get domain specific information on various destinations. One of the scope of services under the tourism roadmap exercise will be identify potential tourism projects. TTDCL shall use the Tourism Roadmap while preparing its own annual tourism budgets and adhere to the roadmap for seamless integration of the action plan. ii. Tourism Investment Summits The department along with TTDCL shall organize tourism investment summits as an annual affair, as it brings down the investors under one roof and facilitates the investments in tourism domain. Secondly, it is an excellent platform for the State Tourism Department to showcase various projects that are on offer for private sector participation. iii. Convergence of Tourism Projects The department shall ensure that it benefits from various schemes that are centrally sponsored for tourism development and related works. Some of the schemes targeted towards the same are Swadesh Darshan, PRASAD, HRIDAY, AMRUT, Swachh Bharat Mission, Skill Development Mission etc. TTDCL shall apply under the mentioned schemes and gain funds for tourism development. Apart from these, TTDCL shall also make a framework to utilize CSR related funds at tourism destinations. TTDCL shall also encourage projects which are green and uses renewable energy as practice by providing them faster approvals and simultaneously providing special incentives to be decided on case to case basis. 13. Incentives and Subsidy for Tourism Projects The State Government has granted the status of Industry to the Tourism Sector in 1987. The incentives and subsidies as promoted by the industry department and as detailed out in Tripura Industrial Investment Promotion Incentive Scheme 2017 and subsequent amendments will be applicable to the projects undertaken for tourism department. 14. Allotment of land for establishing Tourism Projects through private investment i. The State Government can make land available for establishment and development of all types of Tourism Units as per the existing procedures. ii. All Development Authorities, Agartala Municipal Corporation, Municipality Councils, Tripura Housing Board, Nagar Panchayat, Gram Panchayat, Forest, Industry Department and District Collectors would be requested to identify suitable land for the establishment of Tourism units, as per the requirement. iii. After demarcation and ensuring the land is encumbrance free and other issues, and after recommendation by the land allotment committees, the identified land will be sent by the concerned District Magistrate and Collector, to the revenue department for allotment / lease in favour of Tourism department. iv. Land so identified shall be set apart and reserved for tourism units. Information of such Land Bank would be made available on the Website of concerned Body/ District Collector/ Revenue Department and on Tourism department Website. v. Such identified Government land / land on which assets are erected and are transferred to the Tourism Department would be developed as per prevalent guidelines of the Government. vi. Tourism department through TTDCL will put the land to the identified use, either directly or through leasing /licensing out such land in and open, fair and transparent manner for investments, operations and management by the private investor. vii. Similarly any assets like heritage properties or any other assets that can be promoted under tourism, will be taken up by Tourism Department and operationalised through TTDCL. viii. The procedure for leasing out of Government land allotted / leased to Tourism Department will be according to the guidelines issued by the State Government from time to time. 15. Constitution of State/District Tourism Promotion Council: i. State Tourism Promotion Council (STPC) a. The State Tourism Promotion Council shall be established at the State Level. This Council under the Chairmanship of Hon’ble Chief Minister, shall be constituted with nominated stakeholders in tourism sector. b. The State Tourism Council shall be empowered to take decision for various schemes and projects emanating out of the State Tourism Policy. c. The Council shall meet as and when necessary and at least once in a quarter d. The functions of STPC shall be as follows; • Review the implementation and effectiveness of the State Tourism policy and undertake necessary amendments if required to achieve the objectives of the policy • Recommend enabling institutional structure necessary to implement this policy including establishing effective single window clearance system • Prioritize the current projects and review implementation targets • Advise on interdepartmental coordination on matters related to this policy • Invite industry stakeholders to understand their challenges and adopt suitable measures to mitigate the same • Establish a governance structure for regular management of each major destination/ tourism asset • Strategy to devise Brand, Communication and Promotion plan • Strategy towards being an enabler through PPP projects • Unlock Tourism inhibitors like land acquisition, etc. ii. District Tourism Promotion Council a. In various parts of State, cultural and tourism centric events are organized at local levels. Therefore, at each district level, District Tourism Promotion Council (DTPC) shall be constituted under the chairmanship of the District Magistrates and Collectors. b. While the State Tourism Council will drive the policy initiatives, the roll out of specific initiatives will reside with District Tourism Councils for smooth implementation of tourism projects at district level. This is essentially a decentralized arrangement, where local government engage with industry partners to promote tourism. c. Following are the key responsibilities: • Clear planning covering locations, events, etc. • Coordinate fund allocation by agencies as per budgets • Monitor implementation of the projects and assistance to private stakeholder to facilitate investments • Planning, Implementation and Regulation at the tourist sites in greater detail as set out by STC. • Identify land parcels for tourism development in the district • Nodal agency for ideas and information related to tourism at the district • Develop economically viable Tourism Projects for development • License, regulate and accreditation of tourism ventures as per the Tourism Department guidelines • Encourage/facilitate travel writers, media and bloggers for promoting places of tourist interest in the district • Prepare the local event list at the district level • Facilitate convergence of resources of various agencies for the development of tourism infrastructure& development and updation of tourism information for districts • Organize and facilitate training programs for the benefit of stakeholders in the tourism industry • Facilitate the formation of local tourism destination development bodies with local community participation for development of tourism assets • Facilitate and support the development of eco-tourism societies • Promote the development of tourism master plans for each district • Skill profiling of local population to create lists for guides, freelancers, photographers, home-stay addresses and develop a tourism service provider database 16. Tourism Excellence Awards Annual Tourism Awards will be instituted for recognition of excellence in tourism products and services as also for contribution to the growth of tourism in the State. The various categories are mentioned below: a. Best Entrepreneur in Tourism b. Best Woman Entrepreneur in Tourism c. Best Start-up in Tourism d. Most Innovative Tourism Project e. Best ICT-enabled Tourism Project f. Best-maintained Tourism Asset (Swachhta-Puraskar) g. Recognition to Hotels, Tour Operators, Agents h. Green Tourist operator taken up eco-friendly tourism measures. (Significantly contributing to the growth of Tourism in the State). 17. Implementation of Tourism Policy In order to make available required facilities/ rebate/ license etc. to tourism projects concerned departments shall issue necessary guidelines, notifications or amend the rules. In this context, if difference of opinion arises or difficulties emerge, then matters including clarifications/ explanations / disputes shall be placed before the Empowered Committee comprising of following members under the Chairmanship of Chief Secretary for resolution:- • Principal Chief Conservator of Forests • Principal Secretary, Finance • Principal Secretary, Tourism • Principal Secretary, Information and Cultural Affairs • In-charge Secretary of department related with the case • Director Tourism , shall be the Member Secretary. Committee may take decision in accordance with the prevailing policy and the decision thus taken shall be final and binding on all concerned and its compliance shall be mandatory for the concerned department. Committee shall discharge all the responsibilities mandated under this policy. ***** A. LIST OF FAIRS & FESTIVALS OF TRIPURA ANNEXURE - I Fairs & Festivals Venue & Time Pous Sankranti Fair At Tirthamukh every year in January Pilak Tourism & Archaeological Festival At Pilak every year in Non.-Dec. Rajarshi Festival At Bhubaneshwari Temple every year in the month of May. Ashokastami Festival At Unakoti every year in April Goria Festival Month of Baisakh (April) for 7 days Buddha Purnima Festival Every year in the month of May at Udayan Buddha Vihar, Lord Buddda Temple &Mahamuni Pagoda. Kharchi Festival At ChaturdashDevta Temple every year in July Boat Race Festival At Rudrasagar Lake &Gandacherra every year in August Chabimura Festival At Chabimura every year in September/October Dumboor Festival Every year in October/ November at Gandachara Diwali Festival At Matabari every year in October / November Neermahal Tourism Festival At Neermahal every year in December B. TOURIST INFORMATION CENTRE AND CORPORATE OFFICE ADDRESS 1. Tripura Tourist Information Centre, Head Office of Tripura Tourism Development Corporation Ltd,Swetmahal, Palace Compound, Agartala, Tripura, Phone: +913812325930 2. Tripura Tourist Information Centre, Agartala Maharaja Bir Bikram Kishore Manikya Airport, Tripura Phone: +913812342394 3. Tripura Tourist Information Centre, Akhaura Integrated Check Post, Agartala, Tripura, 4. Tripura Tourist Information Centre, Netaji Subhash Chandra International Airport, Kolkata, West Bengal, Phone +91 9432985706/ +91 9038244957. 5. Tripura Tourist Information Centre, Tripura Bhawan, 1- Pretoria Street, Kolkata-71, West Bengal, Phone:+9133 22825703/ 0624/ 2297, E-mail:- tripuratourism.kol@gmail.com. 6. Tripura Tourist Information Centre, Tripura Bhawan, Salt Lake, Kolkata, West Bengal, Phone: +913323340213. 7. CORPORATE OFFICE:Tripura Tourism Development Corporation Ltd, Swetmahal, Palace Compound, Agartala, Tripura West, Pin – 799001, Phone: +913812325930, e-mail: tripuratourism09@rediffmail.com,Website:www.tripuratourism.gov.in ***** ANNEXURE - II GOVERNMENT OF TRIPURA TOURISM DEPARTMENT ******** Guidelines for the “Interest subvention scheme” to promote entrepreneurship in tourism sector. 1. Background: a. Tripura has very high potential to become a great tourist destination in the North East India. There are many tourist locations in the State that are not well known across the country and there are many more tourist locations that are yet to be explored. In order to enable the tourism sector in Tripura to grow, the best strategy is to involve all the stakeholders and simultaneously create an eco-system to increase the number of stakeholders. b. Hence the scheme ‘’PARYATAN SAHAYAK PRAKALP’’ on interest subvention scheme for tourism sector is being proposed to promote the people involvement in tourism sector in Tripura. 2. Objective: The objective of the scheme is to promote entrepreneurship in tourism sector by providing interest subsidy to eligible persons to enable them to take up activities in tourism sector. Through this scheme, it is intended to facilitate the access of loans to tourism related projects and upon successful repayments, as an incentive, the interest component will be borne by the State Government. 3. Details of the Scheme: a. The interest subvention scheme is to promote entrepreneurship in Tourism Sector. b. This scheme will be applicable only to loans taken up for tourism related activities, up to maximum of Rs. 5.00 lakh per loan per person. c. Bank may extend loan beyond Rs. 5.00 lakh as per project cost and security offering within their norms. But, the support from the Government on interest subvention will be extended only upto the loan of Rs. 5.00 lakh. d. If the borrower repays the loan regularly to the bank then as an incentive at the end of every 6 months the interest component will be paid back to the beneficiary. e. The interest subvention will be paid for a period of first 5 years only calculated from the day of sanction of the loan. After that for the remaining period of the loan, the interest will be paid by the borrower. f. The amount of interest repaid under the scheme will be calculated at 8% interest rate or actual interest rate, whichever is lower. g. Borrower will contribute 5% of the project cost as margin. h. The following projects can be taken up under this scheme a. Home stay facilities b. Way side amenities – pay and use toilets, restaurant, dhabas etc. c. Boats – Speed boats, house boats, shikara etc d. Water / adventure sport facilities e. Promoting heritage tourism, eco-tourism etc f. Managing yoga / ayurvedic facilities near tourist locations g. Eco friendly transport near the tourist zones h. Any other innovative projects related to tourism sector 4. Eligibility Criteria: a. Individuals above 18 years of age upto the age of 50 years will be eligible for this scheme. b. Preference will be given to unemployed youths and to those who have completed graduation or diploma in Hotel Management or Travel and Tourism or undergone any skill development in Tourism related skills under the Prime Minister Kushal Vikash Yojana (PMKVY) or any others schemes will also get preference during the course of selection. c. Only one person from a family will be eligible for this scheme. d. Only if the borrower pays regular EMI, then the interest component will be repaid by the Government. If he/she defaults the payment for three consecutive months, as verified by the banker, then he/she will automatically cease to be the beneficiaries of the scheme. e. The borrower shall not be entitled to receive subvention facility in case of becoming a loan defaulter and unable to repay the loan within loan repayment schedule fixed by the bank. 5. Procedure: a. The scheme will be implemented by Tripura Tourism Development Corporation Ltd (TTDCL). b. Applications will be received on continuous basis throughout the year, through online portal (www.tripuratourism.gov.in). c. All the applications received in previous month will be examined by the committee on 10th of next month and if 10th is a holiday then on the immediate next working day. d. A committee with representatives of Industry department and Bankers will be formed to examine the projects. The members of the Committee will be as follows • MD,TTDCL :- Chairperson • Representative of Industry Department : - Member • Lead District Manager (West Tripura) : - Member • RM, State Bank of India : - Member • RM, UBI : - Member • MD, Tripura Gramin Bank : - Member • MD,TSCB : - Member • Any other invitee members as per the requirement. e. The committee will assess the project proposal both from the suitability to the overall tourism development plan of the State and also for its financial soundness. f. The such recommended applications will be forwarded to the banks for sanctioning of the loan. The respective banks after sanction of the loan will inform TTDCL. g. After the sanction and loan disbursal, the bankers will keep a record of repayment of the loans. All such loans where repayments are regular, interest component of these loans will be calculated and forwarded to TTDCL, once in every six month i.e. as on 1st July and 1st January. TTDCL will then pay the interest of all such regular repaying loans to the respective beneficiary as per the details provided by the bank subject to maximum of 8% of interest rate. h. There will be periodical supervision of the Tourism Department on the scheme and on the projects undertaken for necessary facilitation or handholding. 6. Loan Tracking: The loan tracking will be undertaken by the concerned Bank disbursing the loan. The Lead Bank shall maintain a detailed statement of loan repayments on the basis of quarterly information furnished by the concerned Banks. A Nodal Officer will be appointed from the side of TTDCL and one each from the Banks participating in the Scheme for coordination. 7. Repayment of loans: The loans are to be repaid to the concerned Bank disbursing the loan as per its terms and conditions. The interest subvention support from the government will be released twice in a year. The bank will submit consolidated statement (borrower wise) to the department with their declaration with their repayment status of the loan. In case of any loan account turned to NPA beneficiary will not be allowed to receive the interest subvention from the government. However, on up gradation of the loan account to standard account within the tenure of loan, the borrower will be entitled to receive the interest subvention. The repayment of the loan by the candidates should be between the bank and candidates and no guarantee shall be given by the Government. However, government may extend support on recovery process as it extending in other loan scheme. 8. Implementation: The project should be implemented within 3 (three) months of granting the Loan and should start earning income within one year. If the project is not started within three months then it will cease to be sponsor by the scheme. The Loan amount must be spent only for the sanctioned project. Diversion of the Loan amount to any other purpose is strictly prohibited. END Application for “Paryatan SahayakPrakalp” To, The Managing Director, Tripura Tourism Development Corporation Ltd, Swetmahal, Palace Compound, Agartala, Tripura West. Sir/ Madam, I would like to avail the benefit of “Interest Subvention Scheme for Tourism Sector”. The required details are furnished hereunder:- 1. Name of theApplicant:- (In Block Letters) 2. Father/ Husband/ GuardiansName:- 3. Full address of theapplicant:- (a) Habitation/Area- (b) Gram Panchayat/ Ward No- (c) Block/Nagar Panchayat/Municipal Corporation- (d) Sub-division- (e) P/S- (f) District- (g) Mobile No- (h) AadharNo- 4. Date ofBirth:- 5. Gender:- Male/Female 6. Caste:- ST/SC/OBC/UR 7. Economic Status:- APL/BPL/AdhocBPL/NFSA 8. EducationalQualification:- (Highest) 9. Skill Development Training(if any):- 10. Project Details:- (a) Name of theProject:- (b) Location of theProject:- (c) Total Cost ofProject:- (d) Whether New Project or ExistingProject:- (e) Personal investment other than BankLoan:- (f) Preferred bank for loan:- 1. Bank name:- 2. Branch name:- (g) Expected Return PerYear:- (h) Scope of Employment Generation:- If any, then for how manypersons:- (i) Detail project proposal enclosed:-Yes/No 11. Accountdetails: b) Name of the Bank &Branch: c) Accountnumber: d) IFSC code of the bank: e) PAN CardNo: I do hereby declare that the details furnished above are true and best of my knowledge and belief. I further request you to kindly grant my application and oblige thereby. Date:- Place: - ----------------------------------- Signature of the Applicant .................................................... For Official Use Only................................................... I do hereby recommended this application of Sri/Smt............... ................................................,Address....................................................................................... .................................................................................................................................................... ......................................... for availing of “Interest Subvention Scheme for Tourism Sector”. Date:- Place:- MANAGING DIRECTOR Tripura Tourism Development Corporation Ltd. Swetmahal, Place Compound, Agartala, Tripura ................................................................................................................................... ................. N: B: - Documents to be submitted by the applicant (Xerox Copy):- 1) PRTC/Citizenship ofCandidate. 2) ROR. 3) RationCard. 4) AadharCard. 5) Admit Card/SchoolCertificate. 6) Caste Certificate in case ofST/SC/OBC. 7) Qualification Certificate. 8) Training Certificate ifany. 9) A hand sketch map of the Location of ProposedProject. 10) Copy of bank passbook. END Page 29 of 29

Tourism Policy

Andhra Pradesh Tourism Policy

SUNRISE STATE OF ANDHRA PRADESH TOURISM POLICY 2015-2020 SUNRISE STATE ANDHRA PRADESH I invite you to Sunrise Andhra Pradesh, the treasure-trove of opportunities. My government is fully committed to making Andhra Pradesh as one of the top three states in India by 2020. Our ideas are big and our vision is global. Join us in growth and prosperity. - Nara Chandrababu Naidu Chief Minister of Andhra Pradesh Table of Contents Contents 1. Preamble 4 Sunrise Andhra Pradesh 4 Tourism potential in Andhra Pradesh 4 Mission-based approach to developing tourism 5 2. Tourism investment policy approach 6 Policy vision 6 Policy objectives 6 Policy targets 7 Policy validity 7 Policy Instruments 7 Tourism Investment strategy 8 Uniform Tourism Zone across the State 8 3. Tourism Infrastructure projects 9 Eligible Tourism Infrastructure projects 9 Private sector investments in Tourism Infrastructure projects : Fiscal Incentives 10 Complementary/Linkage Infrastructure Development Assistance 10 Land Conversion Charges 11 Registration and Stamp duty 12 VAT/CST/SGST 12 Luxury Tax 12 Entertainment Tax 13 Energy Tariffs 13 Tourism Infrastructure projects accorded ‘Industry’ status for specified purposes 13 PPP investments in Tourism Infrastructure Projects : Fiscal Incentives 13 Land Conversion Charges 13 Allotment of Land for PPP projects 13 Registration and Stamp duty 14 VAT/CST/SGST 14 Luxury Tax 14 Entertainment Tax 15 Energy Tariffs 15 Tourism Infrastructure projects accorded ‘Industry’ status for specified purposes ......... 15 Complementary/Linkage Infrastructure Development 15 Government projects under Tourism Infrastructure : Fiscal Incentives 15 Mega Tourism Infrastructure projects 15 Additional incentives for Tourism Infrastructure projects 16 Performance based incentives 16 Marketing incentives 16 Special conditions for Tourism Infrastructure projects 16 4. Tourism Services 17 Eligible Tourism Services 17 Incentives for setup and operations of Tourism Services 18 Investment subsidy 19 Marketing support for Tourism Services 20 Special conditions for Tourism Services 20 5. Institutional arrangements 21 Enabling a conducive environment for tourism investments 21 State Tourism Promotion Board (STPB) 21 State Tourism Promotion Committee (STPC) 21 Empowered Committee (EC) 22 Commissionerate of Tourism (CoT) 22 6. Marketing and Promotion of Andhra Pradesh for Tourism 23 7. Skill Development and Capacity Building in Tourism sector 24 Promote Andhra Pradesh as tourism education hub 24 Promote capacity building programs across entire tourism eco-system 25 Safety & Security of Tourists 25 8. Annexure 26 Abbreviations 27 Definitions 27 1PREAMBLE Sunrise Andhra Pradesh Andhra Pradesh is the State of Opportunities. The State now targets to be among the top 3 states in India by 2022 and a developed state by 2029. With the second longest coastline of 974 kilometers in the country, a rich historical and cultural heritage, ancient and spiritual temples, serene valleys and hills; the new state of Andhra Pradesh with 13 districts holds vast tourist potential, hitherto. Andhra Pradesh is strategically located on the south-eastern coast of India and is a natural gateway to East & South-East Asia. The state has a population of 4.93 crore (Census - 2011), accounting for 4% of country’s population. The State provides an amalgamation of factors conducive to high growth and accelerated development, such as strong infrastructure, highly talented technical manpower, enterprising population and dynamic leadership. These offer immense opportunities for ushering in growth, development and resurgence of the State- the ‘Sunrise State’. Tourism potential in Andhra Pradesh Tourism in India has grown by leaps and bounds over the years, with each region of India contributing something to its splendor and exuberance. The ‘Incredible India’ campaign which showcases the best that India has to offer to tourists, now commands worldwide attention. Andhra Pradesh has the distinction of being a leading tourism destination in India and is presently, the third most visited State in terms of domestic tourism. In 2013, 152.1 million domestic tourists visited Andhra Pradesh, which was about 13.3% of the total domestic tourism market. The State is a microcosm within itself – offering unmatched tourism potential to investors and tourists. It offers multitude of theme-based options to explore across its length and breadth. As part of its Tourism Mission strategy, the State offers nine major Tourism themes: 1) Beach & Water-based 2) Eco-tourism 3) Buddhist 4) Religious 5) Heritage 6) Meetings, Incentives, Conferences, and Exhibitions (MICE)& Infrastructure development 7) Recreation/Adventure 8) Spiritual/Wellness 9) Medical These nine major themes are further categorized into 42 sub-themes. 04 Andhra Pradesh Tourism Policy 2015-2020 Service Sector Mission Urban Development Mission Primary Sector Mission Realization of SwarnAndhra Vision 2029 Social Empowerment Mission Industry Sector Mission Infrastructure Mission Knowledge and Skill Development Mission Mission-based approach to developing tourism Government of Andhra Pradesh (GoAP) has envisaged a Mission- based approach to firmly set Andhra Pradesh on the path of sustainable development and growth. Seven missions have been identified to provide support in managing externalities and enhance inter-departmental synergy for improving outcomes and reducing delays. The Service Sector Mission would focus on enhancing job opportunities and providing further fillip to sectors such as tourism, construction, hospitality, financial services, education, IT and other allied activities. The Tourism sub-mission will work under the ambit of the Service Sector Mission. The Tourism sub-mission will primarily focus on two key aspects: a) Theme-based development: It will focus on developing tourism projects under themes of beach & water-based, eco-tourism, Buddhist, religious, heritage, MICE & infrastructure development, recreation/adventure, spiritual/wellness and medical. b) Destination-based development through Hub & Spoke model: It will focus on developing tourism circuits on a hub & spoke model. The emphasis will be on developing five important tourism hubs (Visakhapatnam, Vijayawada, Tirupati, Rajahmundry- Kakinada and Srisailam-Nagarjuna Sagar) by 2020, and all other district headquarters as tourism hubs by 2029. Through this policy, GoAP endeavors to make the state more conducive and attractive for potential investors and provide an impetus to the tourism sector. GoAP firmly believes that this sector can be a major growth engine for economic development, employment generation and eradication of poverty by promoting investments in the tourism sector. 2TOURISM INVESTMENT POLICY APPROACH Andhra Pradesh is on the threshold of evolving as the most preferred tourist destination in the country. The State offers myriad experiences to tourists, and multifarious opportunities to investors. The proactive Tourism Policy, coupled with abundant and world-class tourism opportunities available in the State, shall place the State on the tourism map of the world. The intrinsic potential of developing Tourism Infrastructure Projects and Services in Andhra Pradesh, when leveraged effectively and creatively, would make the State highly competitive and possibly, unmatched across other domestic and international destinations. GoAP aims to create an enabling environment to encourage private investments. The State will provide potential private investors with excellent support infrastructure and access to a host of scenic locations, virgin beaches, backwaters, pristine forest areas and divine destinations for developing world-class Tourism Infrastructure Projects and Services. To develop Andhra Pradesh as one of the most preferred tourist destinations through sustained investments, robust Tourism Infrastructure Projects & Services, and provide world-class diverse tourist experience. Tourism shall be a major engine of economic growth in Andhra Pradesh, enabling socio- economic development of the state through enhanced revenues, employment generation and significantly contributing to the GDP of the state. The objectives of this policy are: a) To position Andhra Pradesh as a globally recognized tourism destination b) To become the most preferred choice for tourism investments in the country c) To enable tourism sector to become a significant employment generator d) To deliver world-class experiences by offering unique and diverse Tourism Infrastructure Projects and Services e) To nurture and sustain the rich culture, heritage and environment of the State 06 Andhra Pradesh Tourism Policy 2015-2020 Policy Targets In line with the objectives, the following targets have been set: a) To be the most preferred State in India for domestic tourist arrivals, and among top 12 states for international tourist arrivals b) To facilitate investments in the tourism sector to the tune of Rs 10,000 crore and contribute 7% to the State GDP by 2020 c) To facilitate creation of 5 lakh additional jobs in the tourism sector Policy Validity a) The Policy will be valid from date of notification to March 31, 2020. b) The Tourism Policy 2015-20 will supersede any GO/Circular issued earlier, which are in contravention to the provisions of this policy. Policy Instruments Various policy instruments have been detailed in this policy document to facilitate achievement of the policy targets: } Enabling a conducive environment for setting up and operating tourism infrastructure projects and services } Incentives to encourage and promote private investments } Industry status for Tourism Infrastructure projects for specified purposes } Comprehensive skill development and capacity building in the tourism sector } Marketing & branding of the sunrise state as a globally recognized tourist destination and facilitating investments through a dedicated Investment Promotion team Tyda, Araku Kolleru Lake, West Godavari GoAP envisages that a majority of new projects in the Tourism sector will be driven by private sector investment. A relatively smaller proportion of projects will be through Public-Private Partnerships (PPP) and direct government investment. a) Private Sector Projects: To ensure that Tourism Infrastructure projects & services, facilities and standards are among the best in the world, the Government aims to primarily attract private sector investments in tourism sector, including purchase/lease of land to undertake Tourism Infrastructure projects or Tourism Services b) PPP Projects: PPPs can be established across all the major themes and sub-themes identified under the Tourism Mission strategy. This may include developing/ operating/ maintaining Tourism Infrastructure Projects or offering Tourism Services on behalf of, or in partnership with, the State Government. c) Government Projects: GoAP, through a designated government agency, will undertake select tourism projects where government investment is required to drive tourist activities. To achieve the target investment of Rs 10,000 crore by 2020, the Tourism Department will develop a Shelf of Projects outlining the investment opportunities in the State. However, this list is indicative and not exhaustive. A Land Bank for Tourism Projects will also be created and maintained to ensure timely grounding of Tourism Infrastructure projects. Tourist destinations are spread across the State. However, while the attractions are wide spread, tourist inflow is not. In order to balance tourist inflows and encourage maximum investment in the State, the Tourism Policy emphasizes minimum restrictions and maximum incentives to all investors. Accordingly, incentives in this Policy are proposed to be applied uniformly across the State, irrespective of the location of the Tourism Infrastructure Project or Tourism Service. 3TOURISM INFRA- STRUCTURE PROJECTS In line with the vision of the Tourism Policy, GoAP is committed to providing maximum incentives and concessions to encourage private investments for setting up and operating Tourism Infrastructure Projects in Andhra Pradesh as detailed below. Eligible Tourism Infrastructure projects a) The State Government has identified the following Tourism Infrastructure Projects based on the priorities and alignment with the state’s aspirations: i. Hotels (Three-Star or above category hotels as per guidelines of Ministry of Tourism, Government of India) ii. Resorts, including beach resorts, jungle resorts, hill resorts etc. (Three-Star or above category hotels as per guidelines of Ministry of Tourism, Government of India) iii. Heritage Hotels (Heritage Basic, Heritage Classic, Heritage Grand as per guidelines of Ministry of Tourism, Government of India) iv. Amusement Parks v. MICE Centers vi. Golf Courses vii. Botanical Gardens viii. Urban/Rural Haats ix. Tourism & Hospitality Training Institutes x. Wayside Amenities xi. Spiritual/Wellness Centers xii. Museums b) To be eligible for incentives, the project needs to be a new Tourism Infrastructure Project and compliant with the definitions and minimum requirements as prescribed in Section 8.2. c) Tourism Department will periodically review the list of eligible Tourism Infrastructure Projects and propose inclusions / deletions / modifications, wherever necessary. Andhra Pradesh Tourism Policy 2015-2020 Penukonda Fort, Anantpur Private sector investments in Tourism Infrastructure projects: Fiscal Incentives Complementary / Linkage Infrastructure Development Assistance a) Tourism Department will work with other concerned departments to ascertain, and link up, provision of major connecting infrastructure required to be established for the specific Tourism Infrastructure Project b) In addition, Tourism Department will provide incentives from the tourism budget for ‘Complementary/Linkage Infrastructure Development Assistance’ to support investors in providing last-mile connectivity for establishing comprehensive Tourism Infrastructure Projects in the State. c) The incentive will be targeted to provide support to investors in the form of establishing or, where already available, strengthening complementary / linkage infrastructure as per the specific requirement of the Tourism Infrastructure Project, but not exceeding the total complementary / linkage infrastructure cost. d) Complementary / linkage infrastructure could be in the form of: i. Road access a. From an existing road up to the project site b. Where a road is not available, the Government will provide all necessary revenue record information for the investor to acquire Right of Way. ii. Power connectivity a. From an existing transmission/distribution line till the project site b. Switching station and transformer at the project site can be covered iii. Water and Sewerage connection a. Connection charges, road cutting charges, plumber costs b. Connectivity to Sewage Pumping Station / Sewage Treatment Plant 10 iv. Transport infrastructure a. Facilitate cab services from nearest airport / railway station / bus station for tourist activity b. Bus stand at closest feasible point on the APSRTC route v. Communication network a. Facilitate access to network connectivity for mobile, internet connectivity vi. Health services a. Facilitate access to ambulance services vii. Security services a. Project Site to be covered for safety & security under the jurisdiction of the nearest police station b. Mobile police patrolling in the vicinity of the project site, as deemed feasible by the local police station e) The responsibility for applying and procuring all required approvals for establishing / strengthening complementary / linkage infrastructure will rest with the private investor. The Tourism Department will render necessary assistance as and when required f) The total cost of the Tourism Infrastructure Project will be as per the Appraisal Report prepared by a Scheduled Commercial Bank and duly certified by a registered Chartered Accountant (CA). The incentives towards Complementary / Linkage infrastructure will be applicable as per the provisions below: Total Project Cost <Rs 50 crores Total Project Cost from Rs 50-100 crores Total Project Cost from Rs 100 - 200 crores Up to a maximum of 5% of To t a l Pr o j e c t C o s t , excluding the cost of land, or Rs 2 crore, whichever is less, but not exceeding the total complementary / linkage infrastructure cost Up to a maximum of 7.5% of Total Project Cost, excluding the cost of land, or Rs 5 crores, whichever is less, but not exceeding the total complementary/ linkage infrastructure cost Up to a maximum of15% of To t a l Pr o j e c t C o s t , excluding the cost of land, or Rs10 crores, whichever is less, but not exceeding the total complementary / linkage infrastructure cost g) In case of Mega Projects with significant tourist impact, GoAP may provide for higher fund allocation for provision of Complementary / Linkage infrastructure on case-to- case basis, but not exceeding the total complementary / linkage infrastructure cost. a) Private investors will follow due approval process for conversion of land for Tourism Infrastructure Projects as required by the Revenue Department or Urban Development Authority b) If conversion of land is permitted by the relevant government authority, GoAP will waive the Non-Agriculture Land Assessment (NALA) tax or Land Use Conversion charge, as applicable. Andhra Pradesh Tourism Policy 2015-2020 Araku, Visakhapatnam Papikondalu, East Godavari Registration and Stamp duty a) Incentives have been provisioned towards reimbursement of Registration and Stamp duty charges for the first time only and will be applicable for one of the following: a. Land bought for Tourism Infrastructure projects or b. Land taken on lease for Tourism Infrastructure projects or c. Development Agreement charges for land taken on development agreement for Tourism Infrastructure projects b) GoAP will provide 100% reimbursement on Registration and Stamp duty for all Tourism Infrastructure Projects c) Additionally, if a private investor has registered land within the last two (2) years, and chooses to develop a Tourism Infrastructure Project on such land, GoAP will reimburse 100% of the registration and stamp duty charges towards such investors d) Reimbursement towards Registration and Stamp Duty charges will be subject to certification by the Registration Department and by the Commissionerate of Tourism after commencement of operations VAT/CST/SGST a) VAT will be charged at 5% for all new Tourism Infrastructure Projects from date of commencement of operations. GoAP will make necessary amendments to the relevant clause(s) in the Andhra Pradesh Value Added Tax Act 2005. The proposed VAT rate shall also be applicable for existing three star and above category hotels in the state. b) The Tourism Unit is entitled to only collect VAT/CST/SGST at the rate prescribed and pay the same to the Government. c) Incentive for VAT will be reviewed when GST is introduced. Luxury Tax a) GoAP will provide 100% exemption of Luxury Tax for all new Tourism Infrastructure Projects meeting the minimum requirements in Section 8.2 for a period of 3 years from date of commercial operations. During this period of exemption, Tourism Unit shall not collect any Luxury Tax. 12 b) After 3-years of commencing commercial operations of the Tourist Unit, Luxury tax shall be applicable as per existing laws c) Incentive for Luxury Tax will be reviewed when GST is introduced. a) GoAP will provide 100% exemption of Entertainment Tax for first 3 years from date of commercial operations. During this period of exemption, Tourism Unit shall not collect any Entertainment Tax. b) Incentive for Entertainment Tax will be reviewed when GST is introduced. a) All Tourism Infrastructure projects (new as well as existing) which avail High Tension (HT) connection, will be charged as per the rates provided in the “H.T. Category-III: Airports, Railway Station and Bus Stations” in the Andhra Pradesh Electricity Regulatory Commission (APERC) Tariffs. b) The tariff shall be applicable after the Energy Department issues necessary orders, following due process. 3.2.8 Tourism Infrastructure projects accorded ‘Industry’ status for specified purposes a) To encourage and accelerate rapid world-class tourism infrastructure development, GoAP shall accord industry status to new Tourism Infrastructure Projects, compliant with the definitions in Section 8.2, during the policy period for the following purposes: i. GoAP will work with Government of India for facilitating inclusion of Tourism Infrastructure projects to be eligible for availing loans at par with Industries ii. Special incentives like ‘accelerated depreciation’ which Government of India may provide to new industries in Andhra Pradesh as ‘special status’ will be made available for new Tourism Infrastructure projects a) The incentives towards Land Conversion Charges will be applicable as per the provisions in Section 3.2.2 a) A dedicated land bank shall be created by the Tourism Department and regularly updated for undertaking Tourism Projects on PPP basis. b) The policy of land allotment on long lease for eligible Tourism Infrastructure Projects will be continued. The lease tenure can be maximum up to 33 years at the first instance, unless specified otherwise for Mega Tourism Projects. Where the developer has complied with all the terms and conditions of the lease or license during the tenure, they shall be eligible for an automatic extension. The terms of the next lease will be determined by the policy prevailing at that point of time. However, the “Right of First Refusal” will be given to the existing developers/operators as defined in the RFPs & Agreements. 13 Andhra Pradesh Tourism Policy 2015-2020 Orvakal, Kurnool Orvakal, Kurnool c) Competitive and transparent bidding will be adopted in projects initiated by GoAP. Notice inviting participation will be adequately publicized and the bid process shall be specified in the advertisement. d) GoAP Guidelines for Public Private Partnerships will be applicable for Tourism Infrastructure projects. e) For setting up of Tourism Infrastructure projects that are proposed on government land, lease rent of 2% of 'Basic Market Value' of the land from the Date of Possession, as per the valuation of the concerned sub-registrar office, will be charged to the developers with a 5% annual increase. f) The investor will also be required to provide other securities and performance guarantees as specified in the specific tender document, besides making an up front onetime payment covering all project development costs. g) Normally, the bidding parameter will be Additional Development Premium (ADP), which shall be a percentage of annual gross revenue of the Tourism Infrastructure Project or minimum annual assured amount, whichever is higher. h) As per the Project Feasibility Report and specific project details, the percentage of annual gross revenue may be fixed, and the minimum annual assured amount may be used as the bidding parameter or the minimum annual assured amount may be fixed and the percentage of annual gross revenue may be used as the bidding parameter. i) GoAP may also opt for models like Joint Venture, Special Purpose Vehicle, Equity, Annuity etc. for select Mega Tourism Infrastructure Projects. j) In cases where a private sector investor submits an unsolicited or suo-motu proposal; not initiated by the Government, the “Swiss Challenge Approach” shall be followed, as enunciated in GoAP “Guidelines for Public Private Partnerships” and as per provisions of APIDE Act. 3.3.3 Registration and Stamp duty a) The incentive towards Registration and Stamp duty charges will be applicable as per the provisions in Section 3.2.3 a) The incentive towards VAT//CST/SGST will be applicable as per the provisions in Section 3.2.4 a) The incentive towards Luxury Tax will be applicable as per the provisions in Section 3.2.5 14 Maredumilli, East Godavari a) The incentives towards Entertainment Tax will be applicable as per the provisions in Section 3.2.6 a) Incentives towards specified purposes will be as per the provisions in Section 3.2.7 3.3.8 Tourism Infrastructure projects accorded ‘Industry’ status for specified purposes a) Incentives towards specified purposes will be as per the provisions in Section 3.2.8 a) While preparing the Project Feasibility report of the PPP project, where the Tourism Department feels that the provision of Complementary/Linkage Infrastructure Development will help faster project implementation, Tourism Department will work with other concerned departments for establishment of required major Complementary/Linkage Infrastructure, as per the provisions in Section 3.2.1, and provide last-mile connectivity subject to the maximum limits prescribed in Section 3.2.1. These will be appropriately included in the bid document for the specific PPP project. In cases where select Tourism Infrastructure Projects are undertaken by GoAP, through a designated government agency, the incentives and support to be provided would be based on internal government decisions on a case-to-case basis. a) All projects with investment above Rs. 200 crores, irrespective of the location in the State, will be treated as Mega tourism projects. Additional incentives and concessions on a case-to-case basis may be granted with approval of the STPB/STPC or the SEDB as the case may be. b) For Mega Tourism projects implemented on PPP mode, formation of Special Purpose Vehicles (SPV) may be explored 15 Andhra Pradesh Tourism Policy 2015-2020 Puligundu,Chittoor Mypadu Beach, Nellore Additional incentives for Tourism Infrastructure projects Performance based incentives a) GoAP will institutionalize Tourism awards for rewarding best performing Tourism Infrastructure Projects in the State based on various parameters. Guidelines for the same will be published separately. Marketing incentives a) Government of Andhra Pradesh will facilitate a central booking engine through the Andhra Pradesh tourism website b) Support will be provided by the State Government for leading tourism units under Tourism Infrastructure Projects to participate in Tourism events in India and abroad. Guidelines for the same will be published separately. c) GoAP will advertise Tourism Infrastructure Projects in brochures and other print material of Andhra Pradesh Tourism. Special conditions for Tourism Infrastructure projects a) Incentives provisioned in this Policy shall not be applicable for any existing Tourism Infrastructure project that is being expanded, modified or upgraded. b) For incentives proposed in this policy to be applicable for a new Tourism Infrastructure project, commercial operations must start before March 31, 2020. c) While extending incentives, subsidies and concessions, it shall be a general condition that the total financial commitment from GoAP, including incentives mentioned in 3.2.1, 3.2.2 and 3.2.3 for private sector investments and 3.3.1, 3.3.3 and 3.3.9 for PPP projects, shall not exceed 20% of the Total Project Cost of the Tourism Infrastructure Project, excluding the cost of land. This condition will also be applicable for Mega Tourism Infrastructure Projects. 16 TOURISM SERVICE Andhra Pradesh provides an incredible amount of opportunities for offering world-class tourism services across a wide range of themes, and GoAP is keen to usher investments from quality tourism service operators. Eligible Tourism Services a) The State Government has identified the following Tourism Services based on the priorities and alignment with the State's aspirations: i. Beachside shacks ii. Water sports (sailing, windsurfing, jet skiing, scuba diving, river rafting, kayaking, snorkeling, paddling, etc.) iii. Water ride/sailing facilities (sail boats, houseboats, glass bottom boats, amphibious, hovercraft, seaplanes, etc.) iv. Sea/ River/Canal Cruises v. Adventure services (Parasailing, paragliding, camping/trekking/hiking services, cycling trails, nature trails etc.) vi. Ropeways vii. Heli-tourism viii. Farm Tourism Services ix. Rural Tourism Services x. Heritage walks xi. Caravan tourism xii. Inbound travel & tour operators xiii. Cab services / car hire services catering to tourists xiv. Food courts/stalls at tourist destinations xv. Rest rooms at tourist destinations xvi. Cloak rooms at tourist destinations Andhra Pradesh Tourism Policy 2015-2020 Simhachalam Temple, Visakhapatnam xvii. Parking facilities at tourist destinations xviii. Souvenir shops at tourist destinations xix. Light & sound/laser shows at tourist destinations xx. Audio-video guide services at tourist destinations b) The Government encourages beachside services such as tonga rides, animal rides, children play area, beach volleyball, etc. However, these services will not be eligible for incentives. c) The list of Tourism Services is only indicative and not exhaustive. Tourism Department will periodically review the list of Tourism Services and shall propose inclusions/ deletions/ modifications as per the market demand and suggestions of the Industry. d) GoAP will bring out special policies/guidelines with clear procedures for registration, classification, certification and operation of Tourism Services in the State. e) Tourism Services need to be compliant with the definitions and minimum requirements as prescribed in Section 8.2. Incentives for setup and operations of Tourism Services Various provisions for incentives and concessions to encourage private investments for setting up and operating Tourism Services in Andhra Pradesh are made as detailed below. 18 Investment subsidy a) GoAP will provide Investment Subsidy to investors for setting up and operating the following Tourism Services in Andhra Pradesh. Tourism Service Total Project Cost <Rs.1crore Total Project Cost from Rs.1-10 crore Total Project Cost from Rs.10-20 crore } Water sports } Water ride / sailing facilities } Sea / River cruises } Ropeways } Heli-tourism } Caravan tourism } Audio-video guide services at tourist destinations 15% of value of Total Project Cost, excluding the cost of land 15% of value of Total Project Cost, excluding the cost of land, or Rs.1.25 crore, whichever is less 15% of value of Total Project Cost, excluding the cost of land, or Rs. 2 crore, whichever is less b) The Total Project Cost will be evaluated by a Government registered Valuer. The Tourism Service will need to be approved by the relevant Regulatory Authority for the particular Tourism Service, and will only then be eligible for receiving Investment subsidy c) Investment subsidy will be reimbursed in slabs of i. 20% (at time of commissioning for commercial operations) ii. 30% (end of first year of commercial operations) iii. 50% (end of second year of commercial operations) Borra Caves, Visakhapatnam Andhra Pradesh Tourism Policy 2015-2020 Gooty Fort, Anantpur Akkanna, Madanna Caves, Vijayawada d) GoAP will support building of Complementary/Linkage Infrastructure which becomes essential for the provision of the Tourism Service by way of construction of Jetties (facilitating water ride/sailing facilities; sea/river cruises); parking spaces (caravan services); helipads (heli-tourism), etc. based on the demand from the market and proposals received from investors. This support will be up to 20% of the cost of building of Complementary/Linkage infrastructure or Rs.25 lakhs, whichever is less. e) GoAP may provide any other support on case-by-case basis after due examination for investments greater than Rs.20 crores in Tourism Services. However, the support will not exceed 20% of the total project cost, excluding the cost of land. Marketing support for Tourism Services a) GoAP will provide support for Tourism Services at tourist destinations through marketing of services as part of the State’s tourism megabrand campaigns and facilitate tie-ups with outbound tour operators in other states / countries. Special conditions for Tourism Services a) Incentives provisioned in this Policy shall not be applicable for any existing Tourism Service that is being expanded, modified or upgraded. b) For incentives proposed in this policy to be applicable for a new Tourism Service, commercial operations must start before March 31, 2020 c) While extending incentives, subsidies and concessions, it shall be a general condition that the total financial commitment from GoAP, including incentives mentioned in 4.2.1 (a) and 4.2.1 (d) shall not exceed 20% of the Total Project Cost of the Tourism Service, excluding the cost of land, if any. 20 INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS Enabling a conducive environment for tourism investments a) In addition to the incentives proposed, GoAP is committed to facilitate a conducive environment for setup and operations of Tourism Infrastructure Projects and Tourism Services, and will accord highest priority to improving ‘ease of doing business’. b) Timely clearances and responsive post-investment facilitation services have been identified as the cornerstone for improving business environment and boosting investor confidence. c) Institutional arrangements are put in place to secure accelerated development of tourism in state and to address all inter-departmental issues while monitoring and securing the development of tourism in the state. State Tourism Promotion Board (STPB) a) STPB will be the apex level decision making body in the State for approving projects, incentives, policies and monitoring project implementation in the tourism sector b) STPB will be chaired by the Honorable CM of Andhra Pradesh and the respective ministers are the Board Members. The Board equals a Cabinet Sub-committee with the power to amend/ update relevant government policies and with an overarching responsibility of developing the Tourism sector in Andhra Pradesh. c) STPB will periodically monitor and review implementation of the tourism policy. It will also be empowered to take policy decisions on uni-sector or multi-sector issues. The decisions of the STPB will be converted to Government Orders. State Tourism Promotion Committee (STPC) a) The State Tourism Promotion Committee (STPC) is the evaluation & execution committee under the STPB to structure tourism projects in the state. b) State Tourism Promotion Committee (STPC) will be responsible for the following: i. Provide guidance for development of Tourism in the state ii. To address multi departmental issues for expeditious resolutions iii. To periodically monitor the implementation of Tourism Infrastructure projects and Tourism Services and extension of incentives and concessions iv. To holistically integrate Tourism sector with the other sectors of Government in order to strengthen infrastructure while bridging the gaps in basic infrastructure such as connectivity, energy requirements, etc. Andhra Pradesh Tourism Policy 2015-2020 Dolphin nose, Visakhapatnam v. To resolve any issues related to pending clearances on account of non-resolution of inter-departmental issues c) The State Tourism Promotion Committee (STPC) will be set up with the following composition: i. Chief Secretary to Government, CHAIRMAN ii. Secretary to Government, Tourism Department iii. Secretary to Government, Finance Department iv. Secretary to Government, Planning Department v. Secretary to Government, Irrigation Department vi. Secretary to Government, Energy Department vii. Secretary to Government, Revenue Department (Commercial Taxes & Excise) viii. Secretary to Government, Revenue (Land & Registration) Department ix. Managing Director, APTDC x. Commissioner, Tourism, MEMBER SECRETARY & CONVENOR xi. Any other relevant officer can be invited to participate in the STPC with the permission of the CHAIRMAN d) In view of formation of the proposed “State Economic Development Board (SEDB)”, the SEDB will replace the STPB as the apex level decision making body in the state. In such case, the STPB & STPC will be subsumed under the SEDB. Empowered Committee (EC) a) For faster implementation of PPP projects it is proposed that the Empowered Committee (a Cabinet sub-committee) shall continue. However the role of EC may be strengthened to resolve implementation issues to avoid delay in PPP project implementation Commissionerate of Tourism (CoT) a) The Commissionerate of Tourism (CoT) shall be strengthened to function as a Tourism “Investment Facilitation Cell” and “Single Desk Bureau” b) The Investment Facilitation Cell shall be responsible for inviting & processing tourism investment proposals received in the state. The Cell shall attend road shows, solicit investment, carry out initial due-diligence on investment proposal received 22 ANDHRA PRADESH FOR TOURISM a) There is a need to position Andhra Pradesh as a preferred tourist destination across the globe through effective marketing and promotion to align with the influx of investments for Tourism Infrastructure project and Tourism Services in the state. b) GoAP will undertake the following initiatives to build a strong brand to attract local, domestic and international tourists: i. Develop Mega Brand campaigns to attract tourists and major tourism investments in the State through a focused marketing & promotion strategy via conventional and digital/social media channels ii. Prioritize top 5 countries/ states where aggressive marketing is required to attract maximum investors and tourist arrivals. iii. Develop ‘APEX’ – Andhra Pradesh Expert program for inbound tour & travel operators to identify, train, license and develop tour & travel operators to be well- versed with Andhra Pradesh tourism and act as focal points for attracting tourist arrivals in the state. iv. Organize familiarization tours of national and international tour operators, travel writers and photographers in Andhra Pradesh v. Facilitate participation of tourism investors/entrepreneurs investing in Tourism Infrastructure Projects and Tourism Services in Andhra Pradesh at renowned national / international events / exhibitions to promote the State and Tourism unit(s). 23 SKILL DEVELOPMENT & CAPACITY BUILDING IN TOURISM SECTOR Skills and service are key tenets that will drive superior tourist experience in Andhra Pradesh. Meeting the demand for skilled workforce becomes essential to keep pace with the sustainable growth of tourism sector. The Government of India, through the Ministry of Tourism, has taken a number of initiatives towards skill development under Scheme of Capacity Building for service providers and Scheme of Assistance to institutes providing tourism related skills like Institutes of Hotel Management and Indian Institutes of Tourism and Travel Management. GoAP will undertake the following initiatives to cater to the demand for skilled manpower in the tourism sector, and raise awareness of tourism and importance of good customer service in local communities. The endeavor of GoAP is to cultivate a pool of trained world- class manpower for the Tourism Industry. Promote Andhra Pradesh as tourism education hub a) All new education institutes, focused on Hospitality Education, and/or set up in collaboration with foreign institutions/ experts, will be classified as Tourism Infrastructure Projects and will be eligible for incentives in line with other eligible Tourism Infrastructure Projects as proposed in Section 3 b) Andhra Pradesh State Skill Development Corporation (APSSDC) will develop strategy and undertake initiatives to promote skill development in the hospitality and tourism sector c) GoAP aims to establish a Tourism University with international technical collaboration. This is projected to give a fillip to Sunrise Andhra Pradesh and position it as a Tourism education hub in India. d) To improve the quality of education and promote Andhra Pradesh as a Tourism education hub, the existing institutions will be strengthened and new institutions will be promoted through the proposed Tourism University. 24 Andhra Pradesh Tourism Policy 2015-2020 Promote capacity building programs across entire tourism eco-system Concerted efforts are required for augmenting existing training infrastructure through provision of additional training institutes and enhancing the capacity and infrastructure of the existing institutes. As part of this Policy, the State Government will promote the following: a) Vocational training institutes for skilling people in the hospitality sector for roles such as tour guides, tour operators, travel agents, drivers, chefs, tourism service operators, tourism security agencies, etc. b) Training institutes empanelled by National Skill Development Corporation (NSDC) or the Andhra Pradesh State Skill Development Corporation (APSSDC) c) Existing players in hospitality industry will be encouraged to conduct relevant courses in hospitality/tourism in the state d) Dedicated in-house training centers for skilling people in the hospitality sector Safety & Security of Tourists a) Special tourist police/ stations will be deployed at all major Tourist destinations with special emphasis on safety of women tourists. Presence of women security police will ensure focused safety of women tourists. b) At all major destinations, GoAP will establish Tourist Safety & Guidance centers to ensure a pleasant trip for tourists. A 24 * 7 tourist contact center will ensure full time support to the tourists. c) Special sensitization campaigns will be implemented for women & children tourists, and tourists in general in Andhra Pradesh, and such campaigns will be publicized on global and national platforms. Kondapalli Fort, Vijayawada ADP Additional Development Premium APERC Andhra Pradesh Electricity Regulatory Commission APIDE Andhra Pradesh Infrastructure Development Enabling Act APSSDC Andhra Pradesh State Skill Development Corporation APTDC Andhra Pradesh Tourism Development Corporation CA Chartered Accountant CoT Commissionerate of Tourism CRZ Coastal Zone Regulation CST Central Sales Tax EC Empowered Committee GDP Gross Domestic Product GoAP Government of Andhra Pradesh GST Goods and Service Tax HT High Tension MICE Meetings, Incentives, Conferences, and Exhibitions NALA Non-Agricultural Land Assessment NSDC National Skill Development Corporation PPP Public Private Partnership RFP Request for Proposal Rs. Indian Rupee SEDB State Economic Development Board SGST State Goods and Service Tax SPV Special Purpose Vehicle STPB State Tourism Promotion Board STPC State Tourism Promotion Committee VAT Value Added Tax Andhra Pradesh Tourism Policy 2015-2020 ‘Tourism Undertaking’ means a legal entity under relevant law engaged or to be engaged in one or more tourism projects. 2. NEW TOURISM UNIT A ‘New Tourism Unit’ means a new Tourism Infrastructure Project or Tourism Service set up for the first time by a Tourism Undertaking which satisfies the conditions indicated, and have commenced their commercial operations within the Policy Period; i.e, date of commercial operations falls between date of notification of this Policy and March 31, 2020. The term ‘Total Project Cost’ for Tourism Infrastructure Projects, which meet the criteria in Clause 6 below shall include: i. Land/area in effective possession and as required for the project ii. Building i.e. any built-up area used for the eligible unit including administrative buildings, residential quarters and accommodation for all such facilities, as required for the running of the unit iii. Plant and machinery i.e. tools and equipment including water sports equipment, tents, other equipment as are necessarily required and exclusively used for sustaining the working of the eligible unit but will not include vehicles, furniture and fixtures, cutlery, crockery and utensils iv. Cost of development of fencing, construction of roads, landscaping and other infrastructure facilities etc. which the eligible unit has to incur under the project v. Vehicles used for specific tourist activities vi. Installation charges vii. Technical know-how including cost of drawing and know-how fees Kolleru Lake, West Godavari Draksharamam, West Godavari The term ‘Total Project Costs’ for Tourism Services, which meet the criteria in Clause 7 below, shall include: i. Land/area in effective possession and as required for the project ii. Plant, machinery and movable / immovable equipment, i.e. tools and equipment including water sports equipment, tents, other equipment as are necessarily required and exclusively used for sustaining the working of the Tourism Service iii. Cost of development of fencing, landscaping, infrastructure facilities (example, jetties, helipads etc.) which the eligible unit has to incur under the project iv. Movable and immovable equipment, including transport vehicles specifically required for offering the Tourism Service 4. INELIGIBLE INVESTMENT The following investment shall not be covered under Total Project Costs and will be ineligible for incentives viz. i. Working Capital ii. Goodwill iii. Second-hand plant and machinery purchased or shifted iv. Interest capitalized v. Consumables stores, inventories for maintenance or repairs vi. Any investments in any asset which has a life span of less than five years vii. Know-how fees or cost of drawing payable to a sister concern of eligible unit 5. DATE OF COMMERCIAL OPERATIONS Date of Commercial Operations of a Tourism Unit is the date on which the Tourism Unit is open to tourists on a commercial basis, after due testing, trial running and commissioning under relevant Government rules 28 Andhra Pradesh Tourism Policy 2015-2020 6. TOURISM INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS: S. No. 1. 2. 3. Tourism Infrastructure Project Hotels (Three- Star or higher category hotels as per guidelines of Ministry of Tourism, Government of India) Resorts Heritage Hotels Definition Hotels generally cater for both business and leisure customers, so they need to have a range of products to suit each type. The facilities provided may range from a basic bed and storage for clothing, to luxury features like spa. Larger hotels may provide additional guest facilities such as a swimming pool, business center, childcare, conference facilities and social function services. Resorts are hotels that are built specifically as a destination in itself to create a captive trade, The defining characteristic of a resort hotel is that it exists purely to serve another attraction. It is located in an area associated with recreation and leisure, such as beach side, forest area, hillside, etc. It normally offers facilities for sports and recreational activities. Hotels that are located in places that capitalize on its connection with heritage. The façade, architectural features and general construction should have the distinctive qualities and ambience in keeping with the traditional way of life of the area. Minimum requirements } Star Rating - 3 Star or above; as per guidelines of Ministry of Tourism, Govt. of India } Located near and around beach, hills, forest, water body, etc. } Star Rating – 3 Star or above; as per guidelines of Ministry of Tourism, Govt. of India } Desirable that the resort offers at least one facility connected with the location that helps to attract tourists } Minimum category – Heritage Basic as per guidelines of Ministry of Tourism, Govt. of India. The guidelines prescribe that minimum 50% of the floor area was built before 1950 } Must be located on heritage property Orvakal, Kurnool Dindi Resorts, Rajahmundry 29 S. No. Tourism Infrastructure Project Definition Minimum requirements 4. Amusement Parks Amusement parks are commercially operated enterprises that offers rides, games, and other forms of entertainment. They are generally equipped with stalls for games and refreshments, entertainment shows, recreational devices such as a Ferris wheel, roller coaster, etc. This will also include Theme Parks specifically oriented towards tourism in which landscaping, buildings, and attractions are based on one or more specific themes, such as jungle wildlife, fairy tales, cartoon characters, mythology, etc. Examples of Amusement Parks which are eligible: Disneyland, Universal Studios, Imagica etc. } Built over minimum land area - 10 acres } Includes entertainment facilities such as, rides, games etc. } Food stalls/court } Standalone commercial multiplexes will not be treated as Amusement Parks, and as such will and not be eligible for incentives 5. MICE Centers MICE Centers are designed to hold conventions and exhibitions, where individuals and groups gather to promote and share common business interests. Such centers generally contain at least one large convention hall, mini convention halls, exhibition halls, hotel and parking facilities. The exhibition halls can also be suitable for major trade shows and product exhibitions to promote their products during conventions. } Minimum seating capacity of 2,000 pax, with built- up area of minimum 20,000 sft of convention area } Three (3) Star or above category hotel (as per guidelines of Ministry of Tourism, Govt. of India) } Exhibition Center with facility for set up of temporary / permanent stalls } Other additional optional facilities may include: - Shopping mall, with or without multiplex - Food court / Restaurants 6. Golf Courses It is a large open area of land landscaped for playing of golf. These courses also have clubs, small resorts or eating joints associated with them. } Built over minimum land area of 75 acres } Minimum 9-holes course } Club House with minimum built up area of 5,000 sqft Andhra Pradesh Tourism Policy 2015-2020 Chandragiri Fort, Tirupati S. No. Tourism Infrastructure Project Definition Minimum requirements 10. Wayside amenities Wayside amenities are established to facilitate a hassle free trip for tourists. They are built at tourist destinations or along the state / national highway for the use of tourists. Some of the facilities that are provided at Wayside Amenities include: } Clean drinking water access } Built over minimum 1 acre land with built up area of minimum 2,000 sqft } Minimum facilities to be offered - ISO-certified toilets with separate toilets for gents, ladies, differently-abled - Food court - Communication facilities - Shop with basic products for tourists - Car parking facilities for minimum twenty 4- wheeler vehicles } Desirable to be setup close to petrol / diesel filling station } Toilets } Restaurants / Food courts } ATM facilities } Cloak room } Shops } Communication services 11. Spiritual / wellness Centers Spiritual / Wellness centers aim to revive energy, provide a platform for personal introspection, promote positive health, treat diseases by providing different services such as spa, yoga, meditation, skin care treatment etc. Examples of eligible Spiritual / Wellness centers – Ananda Spa, Jindal farms etc. } For spiritual centers, - Auditorium or well- covered open area with seating capacity of minimum 500 people - Accommodation facilities for minimum 100 people } For wellness centers, - Certified/licensed medicinal facilities with at least 20 well- trained staff - Well-trained yoga teachers with relevant certifications - Minimum 25 rooms, of quality equivalent to three star or above categories of hotels 12. Museum Institutions that showcases collection of public or private artifacts and other objects of scientific, artistic, cultural, or historical importance and makes them available for public viewing through exhibits that may be permanent or temporary. } Built up area of at least 10,000 sq ft. 7. TOURISM SERVICES Andhra Pradesh Tourism Policy 2015-2020 S. No. 1. 2. 3. 4. Tourism Service Beachside Shacks Water sports (sailing/wind surfing, scuba diving, water skiing, river rafting, kayaking) Water Ride / Sailing facilities Sea / River Cruises Definition Beach shacks are temporary structures made of haystack / tent material that are built on or next to a beach with facilities for basic food, sun lounges, shade umbrellas etc. Beach shacks must conform with Coastal Regulation Zone (CRZ) guidelines Water sports include water related adventure / leisure activities such as sailing, wind surfing, scuba diving, water skiing, river rafting, kayaking, snorkeling, paddling, etc. Water transport facilities are used for the movement of tourists to visit local places and enjoy local scenery through modes such as sail boats, house boats, glass bottom boats, amphibious, hovercraft, seaplanes etc. Sea/River cruises are trips taken for pleasure along a sea or river. It is a short duration trip that generally spanning a few hours or a few days. Minimum requirements } Should be not more than 500 meters away from GoAP/APTDC approved tourist beaches } Should have space of sit- down service for minimum 10 pax, serving food with approved standards of hygiene and quality } Should not be more than one storey or 200 sq. meters in built up area } Separate Guidelines will be issued by Government of Andhra Pradesh } Should be at a tourist destination and not be used for regular ferrying of passengers } Operators must be registered with local regulatory authorities } Capacity to host a minimum of 25 passengers (river cruise) and 50 passengers (sea cruise) } Facilities for on-board dining, accommodation and entertainment Shilathoranam, Tirupati Undavalli Caves, Krishna Dist. 33 S. No . Tourism Infrastructure Project Definition Minimum requirements 5. Adventure Services Adventure services involve exploration or travel with perceived (and possibly actual) risk, and potentially requiring specialized skills and physical activity. These may include activities such as parasailing, paragliding, camping / trekking / hiking services, cycling trails, nature trails and rock climbing. } A company operating these activities must be registered with Adventure Tour Operators Association of India or Ministry of Tourism } Guidelines issued by Ministry of Tourism for recognition of approved Adventure Tour Operator should be adhered to 6. Ropeways A transport system for people, used especially in tourist destinations in mountainous areas, in which carriers are suspended from moving cables powered by a motor. } Design of the Aerial Ropeway shall be in accordance with the guidelines issued by Bureau of Indian Standards, MoEF (GoI) and any other guidelines issued by Central / State Government } Structure and the overall system should be built considering the climate factors in the particular region } Ropes/Cables should be of highest quality 7. Heli-Tourism Heli-Tourism provides travelers/tourists to explore, see and visit places via helicopter. It provides easier access to places of attraction and otherwise fairly inaccessible areas and helps maximize visitors' time to visit other places. It also provides a route for extreme sports, and it provides opportunities to visitors to explore remote areas that have the potential to become new tourism destinations. } Licensed operators by the Ministry of Civil Aviation } Approved standard quality helicopter meeting all regulatory norms } Pilots must have Commercial Helicopter Pilot License (CHPL) S. No. 8. 9. 10. Tourism Infrastructure Project Farm tourism Rural Tourism Services Heritage Walks Definition Farm tourism is a form of niche tourism that involves any farm-based operation or activity that brings visitors to a farm. There are wide range of activities such as learning about fruits and vegetables, poultry, animal rides, or shopping in farm gift shops. Rural tourism is a form of niche tourism that promotes pre-identified villages to preserve and promote rural lifestyle, local arts/ culture / handicrafts / handlooms to tourists Heritage walks are way to explore the history of a city/town/village. Professional guides take the tourists on a tour through different historical / heritage monuments across the location. Minimum requirements } Traditional accommodation (farmstays, camps etc.), local cuisine, local farming methods, etc. } Guided walks and farm trails } Farm activities } Applicable for services promoting rural lifestyle, local arts / culture/ handicrafts / handlooms offered at pre-identified villages under Heritage Tourism category } Home stay in traditional accommodation } Shop / Museum promoting local arts / handicrafts / handlooms etc. } Serving hygienic local cuisine to tourists } Guided tours of village for tourists } Licensed tour guides Andhra Pradesh Tourism Policy 2015-2020 Kondapalli Fort, Krishna Dist. Puligundu, Chittoor 35 S. Tourism Definition Minimum requirements No. Infrastructure Project 11. Caravan Tourism Caravans promote family oriented tours by providing basic facilities for stay and travel, including bedrooms and kitchen and can be used to reach places at tourist circuits/ destinations where adequate hotel accommodations may not be available. This would include vehicles viz. Recreational Vehicle(RV), Campervans, Motor Homes etc. } Minimum features of Caravan as prescribed under Ministry of Tourism guidelines on Caravan Tourism } Caravan Park - Presence of sufficient caravan parks in the identified locations - Caravan parks shall have all necessary trading licences/ NOCs from concerned authorities, including fire NOC - Standardization of electricity, water and sewage connections to ensure total compatibility with Caravan specifications in India 12. Inbound Tour Operators / Travel Agents Inbound Tour Operators are operators who make arrangements for transport, accommodation, sight-seeing, entertainment and other tourism related services in Andhra Pradesh for foreign and/or domestic tourists } Recognition granted by Ministry of Tourism as approved Inbound Tour Operator and valid during policy period } All Ministry of Tourism guidelines for Recognition/ Renewal or Extension as an approved Inbound Tour Operator are to be adhered to Focus of Inbound Tour Operator should be to attract tourists to Andhra Pradesh 13. Cab services / Car hire services focusing on tourism Provision of car transport services to tourists, travel agents and other service providers for transfers, sight- seeing and journeys to tourist destinations. } Recognition granted by Ministry of Tourism as approved Domestic Tour Operator, and valid during policy period } All Ministry of Tourism guidelines for Recognition/ Renewal or Extension as an approved Tourist Transport Operator are to be adhered to S. No. 14. Tourism Infrastructure Project Food courts / Restaurants at tourist destinations Definition Food courts are generally an indoor plaza or common area within a tourist facility that is contiguous with the counters of multiple food vendors and provides a common area for self-serve dining. Standalone restaurants at tourist destinations will also be included in this category Minimum requirements } Minimum office space in Andhra Pradesh (in line with minimum requirements as per above mentioned guidelines) } Operation of minimum of 6 tourist cars with proper tourist permits issued by the Road Transport Authority or the concerned authorized agency for commercial tourist vehicles } Drivers should have working knowledge of English, Hindi & Telugu. } Located at tourist destination } Food court - Minimum 3 different vendors at food court serving different types of cuisine - At least one well- recognized food chain serving food and beverages, with a minimum presence in 10 other locations in India - At least one vendor serving local Andhra cuisine - Common dining area } Restaurant - All mandatory licenses required to setting up and operating a restaurant including Food Business Operator license, Food Safety License, Eating House License, Health / Trade License Andhra Pradesh Tourism Policy 2015-2020 Gandikota Lake, Kadapa Gandikota Fort, Kadapa 37 S. No. Tourism Infrastructure Project Definition Minimum requirements 15. Rest rooms at tourist destinations Rest rooms are rooms or small buildings containing one or more toilets. They are generally small constructions built near tourist places, famous parks, crowded landmarks, major public attractions. Rest rooms may have different services such as baby changing station, shower facilities, bathing facilities etc. } Located at tourist destination } Rest rooms must be certified by proper authorities following international standards } Use of ISO certified equipment } Provisions for separate rest rooms for male, female and differently-abled } Appropriate measures for ensuring proper hygiene, water and sanitation arrangements 16. Cloak rooms at tourist destinations Cloak rooms at tourist destinations where passengers / tourists can keep their luggage for a specific amount of time. This service is generally useful for day travelers, pilgrims and tourists visiting tourist destinations. } These can be 24-hour manned facilities or can have fixed timings based on tourist inflow } Proper arrangement of racks } Provision for charging nominal fee for the items 17. Parking facilities at tourist destinations Parking facilities at tourist destinations including services such as Park and ride, Valet Parking } Minimum capacity for parking of 100 cars 18. Souvenir Shops at Tourist Destinations Souvenirs attain immense value when people visit different places of their liking. These shops enable tourists to buy traditional handicrafts, handlooms and regional items. } Above 50% of the products must be sourced from local manufacturers, and artisans S. No. 19. 20. Tourism Infrastructure Project Light & Sound / Laser Shows at tourist destinations Audio / Video guide services at tourist destinations Definition These shows are hosted at places of historic importance and help the tourists familiarize with the rich heritage of the place. Audio / Video guide services are available at tourist destinations to transmit cultural and historical commentary of the tourist destination. The devices may be made available for rent to tourists during the tour. Minimum requirements } Proper seating arrangements for minimum 50 tourists } System for controlling lighting and sound } Adequate power arrangements } Provides information and history of the tourist destination guided by number markings. } Can have GPS-guided audio/video navigation of the destination as an optional value-addition } Content validated by local authority / Tourism Department } Audio available in multiple international and Indian languages as per specific tourist destination. Andhra Pradesh Tourism Policy 2015-2020 Bhavani Island, Vijayawada 39 Dhyana Buddha, Amaravati Baruva Beach, Srikakulam Belum Caves, Kurnool Konaseema, Rajahmundry Horsley Hills, chittoor Kanakdurga Temple, Vijayawada Gandikota, Kadapa Puligundu, Chittoor Government of Andhra Pradesh Principal Secretary to Government (Tourism) Government of Andhra Pradesh AP Secretariat, South-H Block, 1st Floor Hyderabad - 500022, India Phone: +91-40-23459939 Email: prlsecy_trsm@ap.gov.in Commissioner Department of Tourism Government of Andhra Pradesh Tank Bund Road, Hyderabad - 500063, India Phone: +91-40-23452492, Fax: +91-40-23450310 Email: commr_trsm@ap.gov.in Managing Director Andhra Pradesh Tourism Development Corporation Ltd. 3-5-891, Tourism House, Himayatnagar Hyderabad - 500029, India Phone: +91-40-23262151 Fax: +91-40-23261801 Email: md@aptdc.gov.in Toll free: 1800-42-545454 www.aptourism.gov.in www.aptdc.gov.in Follow us on GOVERNMENT OF ANDHRA PRADESH

Tourism Policy

Tripura Tourism Policy

Shri Biplab Kumar Deb Hon’ble Chief Minister, Tripura MESSAGE I am delighted to learn that the Department of Tourism is bringing out the “Tourism Policy 2020-2025”. I understand that tourism in Tripura has come a long way and it is one of main engines of economic development. The initiative taken by the Department like launching Paryatan Sahayak Prakalp scheme for promoting entrepreneurship, introducing tourist friendly activities like audio guides, guides, eco- friendly vehicles, development of destinations like Chabimura, Unkaoti, Matabari and Neermahal are praiseworthy. The impact of these initiatives will be visible in coming years and will help in transforming Tripura as one the most important tourist destination in India. I hope that the Department will continue to play the perfect host to tourists from around the world by presenting the best we have as a destination and also at the same time preserving the tradition, culture, values and the interest of the people of Tripura. I hope that the Tourism Policy will be a guiding document for all the stakeholders to promote Tripura as a premier tourist destination. Wishing all success. Biplab Kumar Deb Shri Pranajit Singha Roy Hon’ble Minister, Tourism, Government of Tripura MESSAGE The tourism sector in Tripura has been growing consistently with lot of innovative activities being undertaken. However it has been observed that this growth has been in an unorganised manner with all the stakeholders of this sector working independently. It has been felt that all these stakeholders have to be brought together so that the vision of Tripura being a world class tourist destination is realised. This policy formulation is one of the steps towards achieving this vision. Tourism in Tripura began very small and has been growing consistency. Today the state attracts more than 5 lakh domestic and foreign tourist every year and has created a mark for itself on the tourism map of the country. I expect the tourism sector to grow more. This policy aims at facilitating this growth and at the same time ensuring that this growth in accordance with the traditional and cultural values of the state. The Government also aims to provide an environment conducive to the growth of the tourism sector so that all the stakeholders especially private investors are encouraged. This policy document also aims to provide this framework of conducive working environment. The policy document has been prepared after consultation with various stakeholders as at various stages and it focuses on identifying thrust areas for tourism in the State, the strategy to be adopted to make Tripura a world class destination, encouraging private partnerships, boosting local entrepreneurship and local community involvement in promoting tourism and all the same preserving the environment, heritage and culture of the state. I believe that this policy will strengthen the tourism sector of the State and will contribute not only for development of tourism but in overall economic development of the State. Pranajit Singha Roy Tourism Policy of Tripura 1. Preamble Global Tourism Scenario: A large number of people are travelling across the world- be it for work, pleasure or for enjoying the natural beauty or to understand the different cultures. As one of the most prominent human activities with positive outcomes, Tourism facilitates understanding of history, culture and traditions of our nation as well as of other countries. It promotes national integration, universal brotherhood and social integration. It offers opportunities for people to people exchange, generating employment opportunities, earning foreign exchange and this raising living standards. According to the annual analysis quantifying the global economic and employment impact of travel and tourism in 185 countries, World Travel & Tourism Council’s (WTTC) research reveals that the sector has grown at 3.9% during 2018. It contributed to $8.8 trillion to the global economy and accounted for 319 million jobs, equivalent to one in every ten jobs. Tourism Scenario in India Tourism sector is one of the largest employment generators in India and plays a very significant role in promoting inclusive growth of the less-advanced sections of the society. According to India Tourism Statistics 2019 published by Ministry of Tourism, Govt. of India, Foreign Tourist Arrivals in India in 2018was 10.56 million and witnessed annual growth of 5.2%. The estimated Foreign Exchange Earnings from tourism during 2018 was Rs.1, 94,892 Cr with annual growth rate of 9.6%1.Domestic tourist visits to all States and UTs in 2018 was 1854.9 Million registering annual growth rate of 11.9%. The Indian tourism industry is responsible for creating 23 million direct jobs (or 5.5% of total jobs in India) and 36.6 million direct and indirect jobs (or 8.7% of total jobs in India). Tourism Scenario in Tripura: Tripura is a hilly North-Eastern State of India blessed with natural rich topography, unique geographical location with tropic of cancer passing through its heart. The State, an abode of rich floral and faunal biodiversity, unique landscapes and moderate climate throughout the year has immense potential for tourism .Peaceful co-existence of nineteen indigenous tribes along with Bengali and Manipuri communities in the State, their diverse cultural streams and faiths, traditional art, music and festivals, beautiful handloom and handicrafts constitute irresistible charm as a tourist destination. It has spellbound rock cut sculptures of archaeological significance, Buddhist pilgrimage sites and the royal palaces that add to the charm. During 2018-19, total 5,29,879 tourists visited Tripura including 1,12,955 foreign tourists. 1India Tourism Statistics 2019; Ministry of Tourism, Govt. of India The bulk of foreign tourists are from Bangladesh followed by tourists from USA, Canada and UK. Though in small numbers, tourists from Serbia, Sweden, Hungary and New Zealand visited Tripura in 2018-19. Tourist arrival registered 10% annual growth during 2018-19. Evolution of Tourism sector in Tripura: Tourism has been declared as an Industry in Tripura way back in1987. Realizing the potential of Tourism in the socio-economic development of the State, the State Government has set up Tripura Tourism Development Corporation Limited in 2008 for professional management and giving further impetus to tourism sector in the State. The Corporation has been registered in 2009 and since it’s functioning the revenue generation is continuously increasing indicating the opportunity for further expansion of this sector. Earlier Tourism Department was part of Information and Cultural Affairs Department but in 2013 a separate Tourism Directorate has been set up and it acts as an administrative department for the Tourism Corporation. People’s outlook towards tourism in the state: The sociable, art loving, ritualistic and festive character of local people is very conducive for tourism development in the State. People’s outlook towards tourism is positive and full of enthusiasm as this has potential for socio-economic development of the local communities. In fact, community participation in tourism development will be vital for success of tourism in Tripura. 2. Need for Tourism Policy in Tripura Tourism continued to develop in an unorganised manner with various departments engaged in tourism development and facilitation but working in isolation with each other. Thus, a need for a joint and collaborative approach has been felt which would address tourism in a holistic manner through an integrated approach. There is an urgent need to consolidate all existing missions and plans, and together with strong participation of the tourism stakeholders to develop Tripura as preferred tourist destination. Considering ever growing and changing tourism industry, the policy shall provide guidance for bringing sustainability through inclusive growth, enhancing capacities of tourism stakeholders as well as for developing regulatory frameworks, which shall ensure quality experience for visitors to the State. At this stage of tourism development, the visitors’ perspectives also need to be factored in. Increasingly people are looking for authentic and distinctive experiences. Additionally, need to conserve the culture and nature has gained even more importance. This requires a comprehensive guiding document in the form of a policy for shaping Tripura’s tourism sector, which has been a long felt need in the state. 3. Vision To promote sustainable tourism in Tripura, with emphasis on enhancing tourist experience, placing Tripura on tourism map of the world as one of the leading tourist destinations and also enabling economic and social development by linking tourism with the livelihood opportunities for local communities. 4. Mission a. To make Tripura nationally and internationally acclaimed all-season Tourist destination. b. To provide world class amenities and facilities to the tourists at all destinations and also provide well managed public amenities on the highways. c. To highlight rich culture, heritage, wildlife, bio-diversity so as to provide unique experience of unexploited wonderland to the tourists. d. To disseminate Tripura’s rich history, cultural and traditional aspects related to the ancient kingdom. e. To facilitate involvement of private sector in establishment and management of tourism infrastructure. f. To encourage local communities in management of tourist destinations as well as hosting activities like home-stay. g. To generate employment opportunities for the local communities in sectors directly and indirectly linked with the tourism. 5. Guiding Principles The tourism policy will be based on the following guiding principles: a. Promotion of religious tourism based by developing places of worship of all faiths. b. To promote eco-tourism in the State in collaboration with the Forest Department. c. Undertake measures to provide best experience to the tourists in terms of information, logistics amenities, security and hospitality. d. Establish active and coordinated participation of Government departments, voluntary organizations, the local community and other stakeholders of tourism sector. e. Set up an institutional mechanism to promote private investment. f. To create enabling framework for public-private partnerships in developing tourism products, projects and services. 6. Validity period of Policy This policy shall remain in force for five years from the date of its issuance and projects started/established/ expanded operationally during such period shall qualify for benefits/exemption/concessions under the provision of this Policy. However, tourism projects established / expanded before the issuance of this policy shall be dealt with as per the provisions of the then prevailing policy. 7. Strategy The following will be the strategy to be adopted to realise the vision of development of Tourism in Tripura: A) Tourism Infrastructure Optimization: The development of infrastructure is key for promoting tourism in the State. This will be taken up in the following ways. i. Destination and Basic Infrastructure Development: a. Destination development will be taken up through Central Govt and State Govt schemes. For each destination, a master plan will be developed, so that comprehensive development of amenities and facilities is ensured. While planning the tourism destinations, Global Sustainable Tourism Council (GSTC) Criteria will be adhered by the Tourism Department, which is aimed to bring all stakeholders together to achieve sustainable tourism. GSTC Criteria serve as the global baseline standards for sustainability in travel and tourism. They are the result of a worldwide effort to develop a common language about sustainability in tourism. They are arranged in four pillars listed as sustainable management, Socio economic impacts, Cultural impacts and Environmental impacts (including consumption of resources, reducing pollution and conserving biodiversity and landscapes). b. Department of Tourism (DoT) will collaborate with State Govt. Departments like Urban Development, PWD, Transport, Tripura State Electricity Corporation amongst others for continuous improvement and maintenance of basic infrastructure such as roads, drinking water, power, hygiene, transport, and solid waste management. c. Priority areas will include setting up of hotels, restaurants, spas and resorts, tourist centres, parking areas, entertainment centres, amusement parks, ropeways, golf course, standardized budget accommodation etc. d. New tourism destinations across the State will be identified and prioritized for development. Every year 1-2 destinations will be focused so that they can be developed in all respects for the tourists. e. Efforts to include Tourism related aspects in action plan of all departments, particularly Forest, Handloom and Handicrafts, Information and Cultural Affairs for promotion of fairs and festivals of Tripura as listed in Annexure-1,Public Works Department, Industry (for tea tourism), Horticulture and other Departments of the State for holistic development. f. Highest priority will be accorded to conservation and preservation of natural resources and beauty at eco-tourism destinations. ii. Development of Way Side Amenities a. Way side amenities will include setting up cafeteria, souvenir shop, parking facility, toilet complex etc on the major roads leading to tourist destinations. b. The way side amenities will be developed on the government land along the National / State High ways or near the tourist locations, or developed in private land by the interested entrepreneur. c. All way side amenities to carry out the brand name of Tripura Tourism. d. In case of government land, the tourism department will ensure that land is allotted / leased to the Tourism Department with a provision to be managed by the Tripura Tourism Development Corporation Limited (TTDCL) and TTDCL will do the bid management for developing the way side amenities in that location. The land leasing will be taken up as per the guidelines formulated by the State Government from time to time. e. In case of private land, the owner of the land or any other person after seeking due permission or arrangement with the owner of the land, can propose to set up way side amenities. The proposal will be given to Tourism Department, which will examine and provide approval. In this case the developer will require to pay a royalty or commission to State Government, as per the procedure laid down. f. Way side amenities will be promoted under the Paryatan Sahayak Prakalp (Details included in Annexure II) scheme launched by Department of Tourism. iii. Development of Tourist Circuits a. Tourist Circuits linking Eco-Tourism, religious and entertainment places of interests to the tourist will be designed and developed. b. Based on the profile of the tourists i.e. domestic and foreign, separate tourist packages will be developed and marketed in the suitable forums. c. Special efforts will be made to develop international tourist circuit and promote in Bangladesh. The places involved will be Moynamoti in Bangladesh along with Pilak and Boxanagar in Tripura that can be developed as archaeological / Buddhist tourist circuits. d. Similarly, there are 6 Shaktipeethas in Bangladesh which can be linked with Tripura Sundari Shaktipeetha in Tripura and developed into an international religious circuit. e. Along these circuit routes, Home stay will be promoted to provide lifestyle and cultural experience of Tripura to the tourists. B) Improving Connectivity: i. Efforts would be taken to ensure direct flights from major cities to Agartala. ii. Operationalisation of Kailashahar Airport, will help to reach Unakoti and Jampui Hills tourists destinations conveniently. iii. There are 22 helipads in Tripura. Therefore, helicopter tourism can be promoted and “Tripura Hawai Darshan” will be started by using the services of Pawan Hans every weekend. iv. The Tourism Department will also work with the Indian Railways and IRCTC for providing affordable tourist packages. v. Tourism Department will work with the NHAI, PWD Department and Rural Development department to improve the connectivity to Tourist Destinations on priority. vi. The Tourism Department in coordination with the concerned departments of the State, will take steps to ensure proper hygienic conditions and to prevent the exploitation of tourists on national and state highways and at tourist places. vii. Police and Highway Patrol to be ensured on all major state and national highways connecting major tourism destinations in co-ordination with Home Department and Highway Authorities C) Human Resource Development: i. In service sector like tourism, availability of skilled staff is essential for delivery of hospitality services professionally. The Government will invest in human resource development so that the managerial and technical skill is made available with the State. Tourism Department will facilitate the operationalisation of Hotel Management Institute at Anandnagar at the earliest ii. All the personnel directly and indirectly engaged in the tourism sector will be trained in hospitality related aspects with assistance from National level apex institutes-like IITM, IIFM, IHMs, etc. DoT shall put emphasis on youth, women, under privileged and disadvantaged sections of the society. Skill trainings and Capacity Building workshops shall be organized to make them employable in the tourism sector. iii. Professional guides will be trained, certified and deployed at tourist locations and at arrival points. iv. Service related training will be provided periodically to all the registered home stay owners, restaurant staff and hoteliers and their staff so that the tourists enjoy warm hospitality during their stay in the State. v. Feedback and 3rd Party Skill Assessment of Trainings provided and Trainees after completion of trainings shall be carried out. vi. DoT will also encourage Hoteliers/Travel Operators/Tour Agents to induct trained and certified guides/workforce for better absorption in the tourism sector. vii. A pool of consultants / experts shall be empanelled to provide necessary training like general etiquettes, English speaking and other languages, cooking, nature guides, heritage guides, resort operations etc as per the demand of the industry. viii. Convergence with Central government schemes like Hunar se Rozgar Yojana of Ministry of Tourism and other ministries shall be ensured. ix. Licensing and certification of tour guides shall be ensured to standardize their services and accreditation of travel agents shall be promoted x. Tourism sector institutions of the State shall be encouraged to include sustainable development strategies as part of their curriculum. xi. Emphasis on capacity building of Local Communities: a. Special incentive scheme “Paryatan Sahayak Prakalp” has been adopted to promote entrepreneurship and people participation in development of tourism related infrastructure & services in Tripura, where subsidised interest loans upto Rs. 5 Lakhs are given to youths. b. Transparent guidelines and standard procedures will be laid down to allow local communities to participate in the management of the tourist destinations and services. c. Active participation of local bodies will be ensured by sensitizing them towards tourism. d. In promoting the local cuisine, costume, art, handicraft and local heritage etc, involvement of local communities is crucial and it will be encouraged. e. Retail outlets for local products, arts, crafts, cuisine, etc will be encouraged wherever feasible f. Community kitchens and cluster of public conveniences at rural locations will be encouraged largely through private entrepreneurs/SHGs D) Marketing & Promotion: i. Social media and digital media will be used widely for marketing the tourist destinations. This will be key for advertisement and promotion strategy. ii. Along with this, destination and package wise new brochures, posters will be printed and short films on destinations will be developed. iii. One key area for marketing and promotion is the Information centres situated in airport, railway station and integrated check posts. The existing information centers will be upgraded and new such information centers will be planned in major airports and railways stations. iv. The participation in leading national and international tourism fairs will be taken up strategically so as to market the tourist destinations in a better way. v. Familiarization tours of the leading tour operators of the country and overseas will be taken up in major tourist destinations so that they are marketed well in the State. vi. Road shows in key national and international markets will be taken up to promote the tourist destinations vii. Signage’s of the international class will be installed on the national, state and at the important tourist highways and stations. viii. Destination Management Organizations (DMO) will be promoted locally, first at Agartala for promoting destinations in concerted manner for standardization of services. DMOs are non-government professional body that market a destination by attracting right quantum of tourists and synergizes activities at local tourist destinations. Responsibilities of a DMO include: • Facilitate reservations for villas, resorts, hotels, homestays • Provide travel management and guides • Act as local partners for group and event organizers • Acts as receptive agents for travel agents, tour operators • Training and capacity building activities for local communities • Tourism products and business development ix. DoT shall undertake initiatives to develop Coffee table books, Documentaries and knowledge material for tourists. These will focus on diversity of Tripura such as its flora, fauna, heritage, festivals and local culture covering tourism destinations x. A 5 year calendar of events across Tripura will be developed including 5 signature events that will be organized annually. Indigenous products will be promoted as part of the event calendar xi. The advertisement will be taken up by the Tripura Tourism Development Corporation Limited (TTDCL) as accordingly approved by the board of TTDCL from time to time. xii. Emphasis towards attracting International Tourists: It has been observed that international tourists prefer visiting places with rich cultural heritage, eco-friendly locations and the locations that offer them unique experience. As Tripura has all these types of locations, steps should be taken to attract international tourists. As the first step to attract international tourists, a detailed strategy will be created for top 5 visiting countries to catalyse the demand of inbound tourism including strategic link up with overseas tourism boards. a. Making linkages with the international circuits of religious and cultural significance and marketing the tourist destinations. b. Efforts will be taken to ensure travel, accommodation bookings and transit seamless and comfortable to the tourists. c. All efforts will be made to access national as well international tourist markets for marketing, branding, promotion of local Tourism Products. d. Comprehensive feedback mechanism of tourist experience shall be developed. E) Attracting Private Investments: i. To encourage establishment of tourism projects through private investment, land bank at suitable locations will be identified and created by the tourism department. ii. As tourism has been accorded the status of Industry, the, Incentives, Subsidies/Concessions will be made available to augment the establishment of various tourism facilities like hotels and resorts in the State, like to any other industry. iii. Private transport operators will be linked to tourism areas and encouraged to provide quality transport services. iv. To encourage MICE (Meetings, Incentives, Conferences and Exhibitions) Tourism in the State, establishment and management of convention centres with private investment will be promoted. v. To provide quality accommodation to tourists in the state, establishment of star category hotels with private investment will be encouraged. F) Safety & Security i. A disaster management plan will be created for major tourist destinations to brace for any eventuality. A dedicated helpline number will be launched exclusively for the tourists. ii. To provide safeguard for tourist, tourist police / private security persons will be deployed at various locations. An assessment will be made regarding the requirement of the police personnel / private security guards and they will be sensitised accordingly. iii. Tourism Department shall liaison with mobile operators to ensure efficient connectivity for all tourism destinations in the state especially far-flung areas iv. Tourists will be provided with information with the better use of information technology and communication mediums. Through mobile based applications they will be provided tourism information. v. Tourist destinations will be equipped with modern telecommunication facilities and ICT. vi. Enabling appropriate accessibility for physically challenged will be promoted at key tourist destinations. 8. Thrust Areas of Tourism in Tripura Eco Tourism Eco-Tourism is a new concept, developed around the idea of travelling to places of natural beauty, moving around and staying at places bestowed with nature for few days. It involves participation of local communities in overall economic development of area, learning environment friendly way of life and support conservation efforts while observing nature and wildlife. Tripura has immense scope for eco-tourism. The State is virtually free from industrial pollution. Its green forests, blue hills, enchanting rivers are basis on which eco- friendly tourism can be developed through: a. Tripura is an ideal place for developing eco-tourism activities like jungle safaris, trekking, rock climbing, forest trails, nature walks, angling, camping etc. All these activities are to be conducted in a manner that promotes awareness of the environment and helps maintain the ecological balance. b. Wildlife Tourism is an integral part of Eco Tourism. At present there are 04 (four) Sanctuaries, 02 (two) National Parks. Department of Toursim proposes to work actively with the Wildlife Wing of the Forest Deptt. to further develop and improve wildlife parks/zoos, bird watching towers and other public utility services for the facility of the tourists. Initiatives shall be taken in collaboration with the Forest Department to preserve/protect these areas from mass tourism flows and development. c. Development of Lakes and wetlands is also part of eco-tourism. The department will take steps in coordination with the Forest Department to maintain and enhance their beauty by undertaking development in an integrated manner. d. Policy for Eco-tourism in Forest & Wildlife areas has been outlined by Government of India. It will be followed as and where applicable. e. Forest Department will also make an endeavour to declare some areas for eco-friendly recreation. f. Creation of infrastructural facilities like good quality tents, cottages-on-stilts with provisions for ethnic food and other logistics will be taken up in the eco tourism sites along with river cruise, water sports etc. g. Dumbur lake will be developed into world class destination with the financial assistance of the Central Government / Externally Aided Project in order to develop activities like water sports, angling, bird watching, setting up of house boats, development of artificial beaches etc. h. Nature Camps, Eco-friendly accommodation, trekking and nature walks, visitor interpretation centers amongst others shall be promoted. i. Guides and naturalists shall be trained and certified in coordination with the Forest Department. j. TTDCL will conduct feasibility study to create cycle trails near selected rivers, natural parks and sanctuaries to discover natural and cultural aspects of the region. k. TTDCL will create interpretation center to promote edutainment in forest sector. Adventure Tourism: a. There is a need to make comprehensive adventure tourism promotion plan for the State by laying down the regulatory framework for enforcement of safety standards.TTDCL shall set out eligibility criteria for entities aspiring to enter the Adventure Tourism segment to safeguard the tourists from the perils of the various adventure tourism activities b. For the promotion of adventure sports, the TTDCL will identify the various adventure sports activities that can be taken up at different location and they will be developed in public private partnership mode. As the first step, TTDCL will work in close coordination with Adventure Tour Operators & Associations to frame resource mapping for developing potential adventure tourism activities. c. To attract private investment in Adventure tourism, TTDCL can offer land on lease or license. Procedure to offer the land on lease shall be followed in accordance with the guidelines issued by the State Government from time to time. d. As training and safety standards are key to adventure sports, training on different aspects of the adventure sports to the youths, will be facilitated by TTDCL. e. TTDCL will make provision for quality equipment needed for adventure activities. These shall be made available in the nearest tourism department office. f. TTDCL will market and promote adventure destinations and expeditions in domestic and international platforms. Spiritual Tourism: a. A detailed infra-gap assessment shall be carried out at major pilgrimage destinations to address the key infrastructure issues in collaboration with Temple Trusts. b. Service Level Agreements for maintaining cleanliness and hygiene with professional agencies in the domain shall be undertaken. c. Funding from CSR shall also be explored for solid waste management, provisioning of tourist amenities etc at prominent pilgrimage destinations. d. Smart solutions will be promoted in collaboration with Temple Trusts to implement services like Wi-Fi, CCTV cameras, display screens, Prasad vending cash cards, visitor management amongst others. e. With the help of local bodies regular cleanliness drives shall be ensured at religious destinations. f. TTDCL shall create Tourist Facilitation Centres to enhance tourists experience at religious destinations. These centres shall ensure centralized booking facilities, tourist information, food etc. g. Tourism Department plans to develop Tripura Sundari Matabari Temple as world class tourist destination in consultation with the Mandir Trust.Along with tourist amenities, Tourism Department will also develop Ropeway from Udaipur Railway Station upto Matabari temple, in PPP mode. This ropeway will become a major tourist attraction. h. Tourism department in collaboration with other States, will market Tripura Sundari Temple as part of shaktipeeth circuit. These efforts will be especially with Assam, so that all tourist visiting Kamakhya can also visit Tripura Sundari temple. i. An annual seven days Kharchi Mela at Old Agartala Chaturdas temple during the month of July has come to be as known as Mahamillan utsav of the tribal & non-tribal, where lakhs of people and Sadhus congregate. This shall be highlighted in publicity campaigns in domestic tourist circuits with an appropriate tagline giving forceful punch to spiritual tourism. j. The Buddhist circuit in Tripura comprising Benuban Vihar, Mahamuni and Nabincharra will be promoted, especially in South East Asia to attract tourists. TTDCL will conduct road shows in the South East Asian countries to promote Buddhist Tourism. k. With similar focus, the centres of other faiths also will be developed and promoted in the relevant market segments. Ethnic Tourism: a. Tripura is a unique in it’s cultural and ethnic diversity. The State is a home land to 19 ethnic tribes and groups, each having its own cultural heritage, life customs, religious beliefs, language, food habits, folk songs and dances which are rich and varied. b. TTDCL shall conduct Social Impact Assessment in collaboration with the Department of Tribal Welfare and Department of Forest for development of eco-ethnic tourism activities in due consultation with representatives from tribal communities. This will ascertain their willingness to participate in eco-ethnic tourism activities. c. A detailed resource mapping study shall be undertaken by analyzing the market potential of eco ethnic tourism d. Only activities and facilities having least impact on the natural resources and the tribal culture shall be permitted. e. Marketing strategies shall be developed for promotion of eco ethnic tourism activities based on sound market research and segmentation analysis and make wide use of electronic, print and cyber media. f. Destinations thus identified shall be developed in accordance with the carrying capacity of the region, and also ensured that the activities causes minimal disturbance to the social diaspora and natural ecosystem g. Tourism infrastructure for promoting eco ethnic tourism activities shall be environment friendly, low impact aesthetic architecture, including solar energy, waste recycling, rainwater harvesting, natural cross-ventilation and proper sewage disposal and merging with the surrounding habitat. h. TTDCL shall work in close coordination with Tripura Handloom & Handicrafts Development Corporation to promote the tribal products i. Accreditations like Craft Mark, Geographical Indication (GI) shall be promoted for the products developed by the tribal people, to adhere to the principals of fair trade. j. TTDCL will identify villages to develop the traditional architecture and tourism related infrastructure. k. TTDCL will also identify in the existing tourist locations and also new locations to provide the experience of local cuisine, handloom and handicrafts, art and dance forms. Efforts will be undertaken to form Village tourism Committees (VTC) in such tourist locations for effective management of tourism enterprises. SHGs of villages shall be promoted to work as supporting VTCs. l. appropriate synergies would be ensured with financial institutions to provide funds for renovating the rural homes so as to ensure attractive, clean and comfortable stay of visiting tourists. m. Some of the identified activities for promotion under eco-ethnic theme are as under:  Rural Immersion Programmes including festivals and folklore  Rural Homestays  Local cuisine  Handicraft development  Participation in tribal rituals  Tribal Sports  Village walks and Jungle Treks, Bird watching etc. Film Tourism: a. The objective will be to project and establish, Tripura as an ideal shooting destination, and for this an exhaustive publicity campaign shall be taken up by the tourism department. b. Film Tourism is an area which can be explored in Tripura, as till date no major films were shooted here. To promote film tourism, the producers need to be given incentives so that they find a reason to do shooting here. c. Also film producers face various difficulties in co-ordinating with different departments while asking permission for local level shooting. Tourism Department will co-ordinate with these departments to obtain the legal mandatory permissions needed for film producers. This service can be extended to the concerned producer company on best effort basis d. It will also be required to declare Director Tourism as the sole authority for granting all type of permissions related to film shootings and the fee thus be collected by the Tourism department could be further remitted to the concerned departments. e. In addition to this the department will invite investment from private parties for setting up of the film cities, studios and hiring of filming equipment etc. for which govt. land could be provided on PPP basis. f. Organize familiarization tours for major production houses in India and across the world for key tourist destinations in Tripura. g. To ensure safety and security to the film makers a separate film shooting wing will be formed in collaboration with the Home Department and respective District Tourism Officers on the concerned area. h. TTDCL shall lease out various instruments available for film shooting in close coordination with other departments like Education, Culture, amongst others. i. TTDCL in consultation with the production houses will retain film shooting sets/structures which can have touristic value. Tea & Golf Tourism: a. There are 54 Tea Estates in Tripura. Coordination with the management of the tea gardens can effectively do a lot in promoting tea tourism in the State. Tourism Department will engage and persuade some of the willing tea gardens to be a partner in the tea tourism packages. The quantum of land allowed and activities permitted shall be as per the provisions of TLR& LR Act as amended from time to time. b. Traditional houses in Tea Estates could be converted into home stays wherein the tourists could enjoy the beauty right from tea plantations upto tea packaging. Many of these tea gardens can be developed to have golf courses. c. TTDCL will also organise Tea Festivals in consultation with the Tea Board. Wellness Tourism: a. A detailed market plan shall be developed to promote medical & wellness tourism in association with concerned stakeholders including reputed medical institutions and practitioners, medical service providers, amongst others. b. Focus would be towards offering medical as well as wellness facilities to the rural/sub- urban regions of the State by developing seamless connectivity to the destinations. c. TTDCL shall also include these centres in it packages and promote them at national and international platforms like travel marts, road shows etc. d. Apart from this Tourism Department also proposes to develop ayurvedic spa /health resorts in association with the private sector at various locations in the State. e. Training the youth in Panchkarma and other therapies will also be undertaken by tourism department through concerned departments. Heritage Tourism: a. Heritage zones will be earmarked around site like Unakoti, Udaipur, Pilak, Baxanagar, etc and accordingly master plans will be developed for comprehensive tourism development of the region. To improve the maintenance of these destinations efforts will be taken to create ownership among locals. Feasibility of creating heritage trails will be also considered. b. Greater coordination with Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) will be ensured and all efforts will be taken to make “UNAKOTI”- a World Heritage Site. c. To increase length of stay of tourists’ development of tourist villages near existing heritage attractions will be encouraged by engaging local communities. Border Tourism: a. TTDCL will encourage tourism activities along the bordering areas of the state. Intensive marketing and promotional activities will be adopted to increase tourist visits from neighbouring states. b. Access to infrastructure to these destinations shall be developed by collaborating with other state agencies to enable smooth commute. Arts, Crafts and Souvenirs: a. Promotion of local art and culture, generation of income and employment as it is a major component of tourism policy. The tourism department will endeavour to encourage the development of souvenir industry linked to local crafts, events and places which would promote a distinctive image of the State both within and outside the State. The private sector will also be encouraged to patronize and promote local folk, culture and crafts for the visiting tourists. b. Development of souvenir industry including standardised packaging is of utmost importance for which leading institutions and voluntary organisations in the country like NID, NIFT, IIPD, NCDPD etc will be actively engaged. 9. Role of Tripura Tourism Development Corporation Ltd: The role of Tripura Tourism Development Corporation Ltd (TTDCL) for implementation of tourism policy is important. The role of the Corporation will be as follows; i. While providing tourism services, the TTDCL shall play a crucial role in establishment, expansion, marketing and advertisement of tourism related infrastructure and services. ii. TTDCL shall identify new areas for development of Tourism destinations and facilities through public and private investment. iii. TTDCL shall focus on management of core tourist services, and as per the need will be allowed to hand over its units to private sector for operation under management agreement or on a long-term lease. iv. To resolve issues related to tourism promotion, management and operations, effective steps shall be taken up in co-ordination with stakeholders of tourism industry. v. Tourism projects shall be established and appropriate support to investors to invest in new undeveloped areas with tourism potential shall be streamlined. vi. As and when required TTDCL can expand its units and develop new areas of tourism through profits realized. vii. TTDCL shall take up up-gradation and maintenance of tourist lodges and other assets regularly to provide better facilities to the tourists. viii. TTDCL shall set up a Project Monitoring Unit (PMU) for taking up intense promotional activities, attracting private investments, investor facilitation, providing incentives and subsidies to investors. 10. Tourism Projects The following activities will be treated as tourism projects to avail various facilities and subsidies as applicable under the Schemes of the State and Central Governments. The definitions of these projects will be updated as per the guidelines issued by Ministry of Tourism, Government of India and Department of Tourism, Government of Tripura, from time to time: • Hotel (Star, Deluxe and Standard Class). • Health Farm/Resort/Health and Wellness Resort. • Resort, Camping Site and Fixed tenting units. • Wayside Amenities. • Heritage Hotel. • Facilities for Meetings, Incentives, Conferences and Exhibitions (MICE). • Museum/Aquarium/Theme Parks. • Bed and Breakfast /Home Stay Units. • Golf Course. • Rope way. • Water Park and Water Sports. • Amusement Park. • Adventure tourism. • Cruise Tourism and House Boats. • Film studio and development of infrastructure and installation of equipment for film making. • Sound and light show/ Laser show. • Other activities related to tourism as notified by Tourism Department of Central / State Government, from time to time. 11. Investor Facilitation and Promoting Private partnerships i. Tripura Tourism Development Corporation Limited (TTDCL) shall function as the nodal agency for investor facilitation under this policy. ii. The engagement of private partners for suitable tourism projects will be according to the guidelines issued by the State Government from time to time. iii. For Investment Promotion in Tourism, Corporation shall work in coordination with Directorate of Industries and Tripura Industrial Development Corporation also to provide permissions, incentives and subsidies for the enterprises and projects in Tourism sector. iv. At State level, for implementation of Investment promotion activities, for granting of permissions / registration / no objections / licenses to Investor of establishment of Tourism Projects, Deputy Managing Director, TTDCL shall be nominated as the single point of contact. v. The Deputy MD shall get resolved all such Investment related proposals in tourism sector through the committees constituted at State and District level and coordinate with various departments for necessary approvals. vi. Private projects where forest/revenue clearances are needed will be dealt on priority within a specified time not exceeding 30 days. 12. Planning for Future Developments Tourism shall plan holistically for all its future tourism developments, in order to achieve the same the following practices shall be adopted: i. Tourism Roadmap The department shall undertake the exercise to create a long-term tourism roadmap of the state. In doing so TTDCL shall engage consultants, as required, to prepare a comprehensive tourism roadmap covering the detailed resource mapping exercises of potential and new tourism destinations. Thus, TTDCL can prioritize these destinations and make action plans for implementation. TTDCL shall also engage experienced operations/experts in various domains to get domain specific information on various destinations. One of the scope of services under the tourism roadmap exercise will be identify potential tourism projects. TTDCL shall use the Tourism Roadmap while preparing its own annual tourism budgets and adhere to the roadmap for seamless integration of the action plan. ii. Tourism Investment Summits The department along with TTDCL shall organize tourism investment summits as an annual affair, as it brings down the investors under one roof and facilitates the investments in tourism domain. Secondly, it is an excellent platform for the State Tourism Department to showcase various projects that are on offer for private sector participation. iii. Convergence of Tourism Projects The department shall ensure that it benefits from various schemes that are centrally sponsored for tourism development and related works. Some of the schemes targeted towards the same are Swadesh Darshan, PRASAD, HRIDAY, AMRUT, Swachh Bharat Mission, Skill Development Mission etc. TTDCL shall apply under the mentioned schemes and gain funds for tourism development. Apart from these, TTDCL shall also make a framework to utilize CSR related funds at tourism destinations. TTDCL shall also encourage projects which are green and uses renewable energy as practice by providing them faster approvals and simultaneously providing special incentives to be decided on case to case basis. 13. Incentives and Subsidy for Tourism Projects The State Government has granted the status of Industry to the Tourism Sector in 1987. The incentives and subsidies as promoted by the industry department and as detailed out in Tripura Industrial Investment Promotion Incentive Scheme 2017 and subsequent amendments will be applicable to the projects undertaken for tourism department. 14. Allotment of land for establishing Tourism Projects through private investment i. The State Government can make land available for establishment and development of all types of Tourism Units as per the existing procedures. ii. All Development Authorities, Agartala Municipal Corporation, Municipality Councils, Tripura Housing Board, Nagar Panchayat, Gram Panchayat, Forest, Industry Department and District Collectors would be requested to identify suitable land for the establishment of Tourism units, as per the requirement. iii. After demarcation and ensuring the land is encumbrance free and other issues, and after recommendation by the land allotment committees, the identified land will be sent by the concerned District Magistrate and Collector, to the revenue department for allotment / lease in favour of Tourism department. iv. Land so identified shall be set apart and reserved for tourism units. Information of such Land Bank would be made available on the Website of concerned Body/ District Collector/ Revenue Department and on Tourism department Website. v. Such identified Government land / land on which assets are erected and are transferred to the Tourism Department would be developed as per prevalent guidelines of the Government. vi. Tourism department through TTDCL will put the land to the identified use, either directly or through leasing /licensing out such land in and open, fair and transparent manner for investments, operations and management by the private investor. vii. Similarly any assets like heritage properties or any other assets that can be promoted under tourism, will be taken up by Tourism Department and operationalised through TTDCL. viii. The procedure for leasing out of Government land allotted / leased to Tourism Department will be according to the guidelines issued by the State Government from time to time. 15. Constitution of State/District Tourism Promotion Council: i. State Tourism Promotion Council (STPC) a. The State Tourism Promotion Council shall be established at the State Level. This Council under the Chairmanship of Hon’ble Chief Minister, shall be constituted with nominated stakeholders in tourism sector. b. The State Tourism Council shall be empowered to take decision for various schemes and projects emanating out of the State Tourism Policy. c. The Council shall meet as and when necessary and at least once in a quarter d. The functions of STPC shall be as follows; • Review the implementation and effectiveness of the State Tourism policy and undertake necessary amendments if required to achieve the objectives of the policy • Recommend enabling institutional structure necessary to implement this policy including establishing effective single window clearance system • Prioritize the current projects and review implementation targets • Advise on interdepartmental coordination on matters related to this policy • Invite industry stakeholders to understand their challenges and adopt suitable measures to mitigate the same • Establish a governance structure for regular management of each major destination/ tourism asset • Strategy to devise Brand, Communication and Promotion plan • Strategy towards being an enabler through PPP projects • Unlock Tourism inhibitors like land acquisition, etc. ii. District Tourism Promotion Council a. In various parts of State, cultural and tourism centric events are organized at local levels. Therefore, at each district level, District Tourism Promotion Council (DTPC) shall be constituted under the chairmanship of the District Magistrates and Collectors. b. While the State Tourism Council will drive the policy initiatives, the roll out of specific initiatives will reside with District Tourism Councils for smooth implementation of tourism projects at district level. This is essentially a decentralized arrangement, where local government engage with industry partners to promote tourism. c. Following are the key responsibilities: • Clear planning covering locations, events, etc. • Coordinate fund allocation by agencies as per budgets • Monitor implementation of the projects and assistance to private stakeholder to facilitate investments • Planning, Implementation and Regulation at the tourist sites in greater detail as set out by STC. • Identify land parcels for tourism development in the district • Nodal agency for ideas and information related to tourism at the district • Develop economically viable Tourism Projects for development • License, regulate and accreditation of tourism ventures as per the Tourism Department guidelines • Encourage/facilitate travel writers, media and bloggers for promoting places of tourist interest in the district • Prepare the local event list at the district level • Facilitate convergence of resources of various agencies for the development of tourism infrastructure& development and updation of tourism information for districts • Organize and facilitate training programs for the benefit of stakeholders in the tourism industry • Facilitate the formation of local tourism destination development bodies with local community participation for development of tourism assets • Facilitate and support the development of eco-tourism societies • Promote the development of tourism master plans for each district • Skill profiling of local population to create lists for guides, freelancers, photographers, home-stay addresses and develop a tourism service provider database 16. Tourism Excellence Awards Annual Tourism Awards will be instituted for recognition of excellence in tourism products and services as also for contribution to the growth of tourism in the State. The various categories are mentioned below: a. Best Entrepreneur in Tourism b. Best Woman Entrepreneur in Tourism c. Best Start-up in Tourism d. Most Innovative Tourism Project e. Best ICT-enabled Tourism Project f. Best-maintained Tourism Asset (Swachhta-Puraskar) g. Recognition to Hotels, Tour Operators, Agents h. Green Tourist operator taken up eco-friendly tourism measures. (Significantly contributing to the growth of Tourism in the State). 17. Implementation of Tourism Policy In order to make available required facilities/ rebate/ license etc. to tourism projects concerned departments shall issue necessary guidelines, notifications or amend the rules. In this context, if difference of opinion arises or difficulties emerge, then matters including clarifications/ explanations / disputes shall be placed before the Empowered Committee comprising of following members under the Chairmanship of Chief Secretary for resolution:- • Principal Chief Conservator of Forests • Principal Secretary, Finance • Principal Secretary, Tourism • Principal Secretary, Information and Cultural Affairs • In-charge Secretary of department related with the case • Director Tourism , shall be the Member Secretary. Committee may take decision in accordance with the prevailing policy and the decision thus taken shall be final and binding on all concerned and its compliance shall be mandatory for the concerned department. Committee shall discharge all the responsibilities mandated under this policy. ***** A. LIST OF FAIRS & FESTIVALS OF TRIPURA ANNEXURE - I Fairs & Festivals Venue & Time Pous Sankranti Fair At Tirthamukh every year in January Pilak Tourism & Archaeological Festival At Pilak every year in Non.-Dec. Rajarshi Festival At Bhubaneshwari Temple every year in the month of May. Ashokastami Festival At Unakoti every year in April Goria Festival Month of Baisakh (April) for 7 days Buddha Purnima Festival Every year in the month of May at Udayan Buddha Vihar, Lord Buddda Temple &Mahamuni Pagoda. Kharchi Festival At ChaturdashDevta Temple every year in July Boat Race Festival At Rudrasagar Lake &Gandacherra every year in August Chabimura Festival At Chabimura every year in September/October Dumboor Festival Every year in October/ November at Gandachara Diwali Festival At Matabari every year in October / November Neermahal Tourism Festival At Neermahal every year in December B. TOURIST INFORMATION CENTRE AND CORPORATE OFFICE ADDRESS 1. Tripura Tourist Information Centre, Head Office of Tripura Tourism Development Corporation Ltd,Swetmahal, Palace Compound, Agartala, Tripura, Phone: +913812325930 2. Tripura Tourist Information Centre, Agartala Maharaja Bir Bikram Kishore Manikya Airport, Tripura Phone: +913812342394 3. Tripura Tourist Information Centre, Akhaura Integrated Check Post, Agartala, Tripura, 4. Tripura Tourist Information Centre, Netaji Subhash Chandra International Airport, Kolkata, West Bengal, Phone +91 9432985706/ +91 9038244957. 5. Tripura Tourist Information Centre, Tripura Bhawan, 1- Pretoria Street, Kolkata-71, West Bengal, Phone:+9133 22825703/ 0624/ 2297, E-mail:- tripuratourism.kol@gmail.com. 6. Tripura Tourist Information Centre, Tripura Bhawan, Salt Lake, Kolkata, West Bengal, Phone: +913323340213. 7. CORPORATE OFFICE:Tripura Tourism Development Corporation Ltd, Swetmahal, Palace Compound, Agartala, Tripura West, Pin – 799001, Phone: +913812325930, e-mail: tripuratourism09@rediffmail.com,Website:www.tripuratourism.gov.in ***** ANNEXURE - II GOVERNMENT OF TRIPURA TOURISM DEPARTMENT ******** Guidelines for the “Interest subvention scheme” to promote entrepreneurship in tourism sector. 1. Background: a. Tripura has very high potential to become a great tourist destination in the North East India. There are many tourist locations in the State that are not well known across the country and there are many more tourist locations that are yet to be explored. In order to enable the tourism sector in Tripura to grow, the best strategy is to involve all the stakeholders and simultaneously create an eco-system to increase the number of stakeholders. b. Hence the scheme ‘’PARYATAN SAHAYAK PRAKALP’’ on interest subvention scheme for tourism sector is being proposed to promote the people involvement in tourism sector in Tripura. 2. Objective: The objective of the scheme is to promote entrepreneurship in tourism sector by providing interest subsidy to eligible persons to enable them to take up activities in tourism sector. Through this scheme, it is intended to facilitate the access of loans to tourism related projects and upon successful repayments, as an incentive, the interest component will be borne by the State Government. 3. Details of the Scheme: a. The interest subvention scheme is to promote entrepreneurship in Tourism Sector. b. This scheme will be applicable only to loans taken up for tourism related activities, up to maximum of Rs. 5.00 lakh per loan per person. c. Bank may extend loan beyond Rs. 5.00 lakh as per project cost and security offering within their norms. But, the support from the Government on interest subvention will be extended only upto the loan of Rs. 5.00 lakh. d. If the borrower repays the loan regularly to the bank then as an incentive at the end of every 6 months the interest component will be paid back to the beneficiary. e. The interest subvention will be paid for a period of first 5 years only calculated from the day of sanction of the loan. After that for the remaining period of the loan, the interest will be paid by the borrower. f. The amount of interest repaid under the scheme will be calculated at 8% interest rate or actual interest rate, whichever is lower. g. Borrower will contribute 5% of the project cost as margin. h. The following projects can be taken up under this scheme a. Home stay facilities b. Way side amenities – pay and use toilets, restaurant, dhabas etc. c. Boats – Speed boats, house boats, shikara etc d. Water / adventure sport facilities e. Promoting heritage tourism, eco-tourism etc f. Managing yoga / ayurvedic facilities near tourist locations g. Eco friendly transport near the tourist zones h. Any other innovative projects related to tourism sector 4. Eligibility Criteria: a. Individuals above 18 years of age upto the age of 50 years will be eligible for this scheme. b. Preference will be given to unemployed youths and to those who have completed graduation or diploma in Hotel Management or Travel and Tourism or undergone any skill development in Tourism related skills under the Prime Minister Kushal Vikash Yojana (PMKVY) or any others schemes will also get preference during the course of selection. c. Only one person from a family will be eligible for this scheme. d. Only if the borrower pays regular EMI, then the interest component will be repaid by the Government. If he/she defaults the payment for three consecutive months, as verified by the banker, then he/she will automatically cease to be the beneficiaries of the scheme. e. The borrower shall not be entitled to receive subvention facility in case of becoming a loan defaulter and unable to repay the loan within loan repayment schedule fixed by the bank. 5. Procedure: a. The scheme will be implemented by Tripura Tourism Development Corporation Ltd (TTDCL). b. Applications will be received on continuous basis throughout the year, through online portal (www.tripuratourism.gov.in). c. All the applications received in previous month will be examined by the committee on 10th of next month and if 10th is a holiday then on the immediate next working day. d. A committee with representatives of Industry department and Bankers will be formed to examine the projects. The members of the Committee will be as follows • MD,TTDCL :- Chairperson • Representative of Industry Department : - Member • Lead District Manager (West Tripura) : - Member • RM, State Bank of India : - Member • RM, UBI : - Member • MD, Tripura Gramin Bank : - Member • MD,TSCB : - Member • Any other invitee members as per the requirement. e. The committee will assess the project proposal both from the suitability to the overall tourism development plan of the State and also for its financial soundness. f. The such recommended applications will be forwarded to the banks for sanctioning of the loan. The respective banks after sanction of the loan will inform TTDCL. g. After the sanction and loan disbursal, the bankers will keep a record of repayment of the loans. All such loans where repayments are regular, interest component of these loans will be calculated and forwarded to TTDCL, once in every six month i.e. as on 1st July and 1st January. TTDCL will then pay the interest of all such regular repaying loans to the respective beneficiary as per the details provided by the bank subject to maximum of 8% of interest rate. h. There will be periodical supervision of the Tourism Department on the scheme and on the projects undertaken for necessary facilitation or handholding. 6. Loan Tracking: The loan tracking will be undertaken by the concerned Bank disbursing the loan. The Lead Bank shall maintain a detailed statement of loan repayments on the basis of quarterly information furnished by the concerned Banks. A Nodal Officer will be appointed from the side of TTDCL and one each from the Banks participating in the Scheme for coordination. 7. Repayment of loans: The loans are to be repaid to the concerned Bank disbursing the loan as per its terms and conditions. The interest subvention support from the government will be released twice in a year. The bank will submit consolidated statement (borrower wise) to the department with their declaration with their repayment status of the loan. In case of any loan account turned to NPA beneficiary will not be allowed to receive the interest subvention from the government. However, on up gradation of the loan account to standard account within the tenure of loan, the borrower will be entitled to receive the interest subvention. The repayment of the loan by the candidates should be between the bank and candidates and no guarantee shall be given by the Government. However, government may extend support on recovery process as it extending in other loan scheme. 8. Implementation: The project should be implemented within 3 (three) months of granting the Loan and should start earning income within one year. If the project is not started within three months then it will cease to be sponsor by the scheme. The Loan amount must be spent only for the sanctioned project. Diversion of the Loan amount to any other purpose is strictly prohibited. -----------------------------------------------END----------------------------------------------- Application for “Paryatan SahayakPrakalp” To, The Managing Director, Tripura Tourism Development Corporation Ltd, Swetmahal, Palace Compound, Agartala, Tripura West. Sir/ Madam, I would like to avail the benefit of “Interest Subvention Scheme for Tourism Sector”. The required details are furnished hereunder:- 1. Name of theApplicant:- (In Block Letters) 2. Father/ Husband/ GuardiansName:- 3. Full address of theapplicant:- (a) Habitation/Area- (b) Gram Panchayat/ Ward No- (c) Block/Nagar Panchayat/Municipal Corporation- (d) Sub-division- (e) P/S- (f) District- (g) Mobile No- (h) AadharNo- 4. Date ofBirth:- 5. Gender:- Male/Female 6. Caste:- ST/SC/OBC/UR 7. Economic Status:- APL/BPL/AdhocBPL/NFSA 8. EducationalQualification:- (Highest) 9. Skill Development Training(if any):- 10. Project Details:- (a) Name of theProject:- (b) Location of theProject:- (c) Total Cost ofProject:- (d) Whether New Project or ExistingProject:- (e) Personal investment other than BankLoan:- (f) Preferred bank for loan:- 1. Bank name:- 2. Branch name:- (g) Expected Return PerYear:- (h) Scope of Employment Generation:- If any, then for how manypersons:- (i) Detail project proposal enclosed:-Yes/No 11. Accountdetails: b) Name of the Bank &Branch: c) Accountnumber: d) IFSC code of the bank: e) PAN CardNo: I do hereby declare that the details furnished above are true and best of my knowledge and belief. I further request you to kindly grant my application and oblige thereby. Date:- Place: - ----------------------------------- Signature of the Applicant .................................................... For Official Use Only................................................... I do hereby recommended this application of Sri/Smt............... ................................................,Address....................................................................................... .................................................................................................................................................... ......................................... for availing of “Interest Subvention Scheme for Tourism Sector”. Date:- Place:- MANAGING DIRECTOR Tripura Tourism Development Corporation Ltd. Swetmahal, Place Compound, Agartala, Tripura ................................................................................................................................... ................. N: B: - Documents to be submitted by the applicant (Xerox Copy):- 1) PRTC/Citizenship ofCandidate. 2) ROR. 3) RationCard. 4) AadharCard. 5) Admit Card/SchoolCertificate. 6) Caste Certificate in case ofST/SC/OBC. 7) Qualification Certificate. 8) Training Certificate ifany. 9) A hand sketch map of the Location of ProposedProject. 10) Copy of bank passbook. -----------------------------------------------END----------------------------------------------- Page 29 of 29

Tourism Policy

Rajasthan Tourism Policy

Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015 Government of Rajasthan Department of Tourism Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015 November, 2015 INDEX 1. Background 05 2. Definition of a Tourism Unit 06 3. Allotment of Government Land for Tourism Units 08 4. Conversion of Land for Tourism Units 09 5. FAR (Floor Area Ratio) 12 6. Regularisation of Existing Tourism Units 12 7. Fiscal Benefits and Incentives 13 8. Incentives for Skill Development 13 9. Time period of Annual Licenses for Tourism Units 13 10. Constitution of Tourism Advisory Committee 14 11. Nodal Department 14 12. Policy Period 14 13. Implementation of the Policy 14 14. Annexure 15 15. Related Notifications 24 Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015 1. Background Rajasthan is a leading tourism State in the country. Its glorious heritage, colorful living traditions and vibrant culture are special attractions for both, domestic and foreign tourists. The tangible and intangible tourism products of the State offer immense potential for growth of the tourism industry. Development of tourism resources and increasing both, domestic and foreign tourist arrivals is a high priority area for the Union and State Governments. Therefore, there is a need for expanding tourist centric infrastructural facilities to keep pace with the present trends and for potential tourism growth in the State. Department of Tourism had announced a Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy in 2007. This Policy will now be replaced by Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy, 2015 in order to extend more support and incentives for establishment of Tourism Units in the State. The new Policy has been framed keeping in view the guidelines under the 'Suraj Sankalp' Policy document, new emerging trends in the tourism sector, representations given by various stakeholders including the tourism and trade organisations and also the suggestions received from other departments. The Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy, 2015 primarily addresses issues relating to time bound conversion of land for tourism units including new hotels and heritage hotels, time bound approval of building plans, grant of Patta to heritage hotels, allotment of land for tourism units on DLC (District Level Committee) rates, applicability of Rajasthan Investment Promotion Scheme, 2014 (RIPS-2014) for tourism units and smooth and speedy implementation of the provisions of related departments like Revenue, Urban Development and Housing (UDH) & Local Self Government (LSG), Panchayati Raj, etc. It is expected that this Policy will strengthen the existing infrastructure, will foster infrastructure development, income and employment generation and increase the much needed availability of hotel rooms for the tourists. By allowing Heritage Hotels in Rural Abadi/Panchayat areas Rural Tourism is likely to increase manifold. The definition of Tourism Unit has been expanded to cover various types of tourism units and activities including budget hotels, heritage hotels, resorts, golf courses, adventure sports, etc. It is expected that these steps will bring speedy investment in the State. 05 Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015 2. Definition of a Tourism Unit Tourism Unit will mean a tourism project approved by the Department of Tourism, Government of Rajasthan or by the Ministry of Tourism, Government of India and shall include: I. A Hotel including Motel having accommodation of minimum 20 lettable rooms and a minimum investment of Rs.2 crore. The permissible size of the land/plot shall be as per the rules of UDH/Revenue/Panchayati Raj Departments. II. A Heritage Hotel means a hotel run in a fort, a fortress, a palace, a haveli, a castle, hunting lodge or residences with heritage features, built prior to 1.1.1950 and approved by Ministry of Tourism, Government of India or Government of Rajasthan. III. A Budget Hotel having accommodation of minimum 20 lettable rooms and a minimum investment of Rs.2 crore, which provides basic amenities at an affordable & economic rates and those which do not fall in the ambit of Luxury Tax. IV. A Restaurant or cafeteria having an investment of at least Rs.1 crore (excluding land cost) with seating capacity of a minimum of 40 persons/visitors at a time. The unit must have a hygienically maintained kitchen with modern equipment in the premises as well as a separate toilet facility for ladies and gents. V. A Resort which provides sports/recreational facilities, riding, swimming or social amenities with boarding and lodging arrangements for holidaying in cottages/rooms. VI. A Sports Resort such as a Golf Course, Golf Academy or adventure related sports or any other sports activity with or without recreational and accommodation facilities, provided that in respect of a golf course, source of water for the course will substantially be recycled water. VII. A Health Resort Spa is a short-term residential/lodging facility with the purpose of providing spa services such as massages, yoga, meditation and other related treatments for rejuvenating the body. VIII. A Camping Site with furnished tents, accommodation, having at least 10 tents along with dining, bathrooms/toilet facilities. 06 Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015 IX. An Amusement Park providing various types of rides, games and amusement activities. X. An Animal Safari Park developed with the permission of the Forests Department. XI. A MICE/Convention Centre: A covered pillar-less, air conditioned hall having minimum carpet area of 5000 square feet space that provides place for meetings, conventions/conferences and exhibitions, and can accommodate at least 500 persons at one point of time. XII. Museum: A building in which objects of historical, scientific, artistic or cultural interest are stored and exhibited and is open for general public with or without ticket. XIII. A Ropeway established under the prevailing Act and Rules. XIV. A Tourist Luxury Coach shall mean an air-conditioned coach with push back seats used for the normal transportation of tourists to different tourist destinations and for sightseeing of various tourist places, with a minimum seating capacity of 13 seats. It should be operated by valid All India Permit holder Tourist Transport Operators, recognized by Indian Association of Tour Operators (IATO) and Rajasthan Association of Tour Operators (RATO) and registered in the State of Rajasthan. XV. Caravan: A specially built vehicle registered with any State Transport Department which is used for the purpose of group oriented leisure travel with bed capacity of at least 4 beds. XVI. Cruise Tourism: Any Boat/Yacht with a minimum seating capacity for 4 persons, which is licensed by the Transport Department, Government of Rajasthan and having capacity to operate in lakes/rivers of the State for pay-and-use facilities. Boats/Yachts used by hotels to transport or entertain their guests and/or goods/raw materials will not be covered under this definition. XVII. Hotels and other tourism units classified under the Ministry of Tourism, Government of India guidelines shall also be eligible for obtaining concessions and incentives under this Policy irrespective of number of rooms in it. 07 Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015 Note 1: All concerned departments shall adopt the above definition in their respective Acts/Rules/Regulations. The definition of Tourism Units may be revised and amended from time to time keeping in view the emerging trends in the tourism sector, by the Tourism Department, which will also be incorporated in the relevant Acts/Rules/Regulations. Note 2: Benefits under the Tourism Policy/RIPS can only be availed as per the terms and conditions laid down in prevailing RIPS. 3. Allotment of Government Land for Tourism Units The State Government can make land available for establishment and development of all types of Tourism Units as per prevailing procedure, which is indicated below: I. All Development Authorities (like JDA), UITs, Municipal Bodies, Rajasthan Housing Board, Gram Panchayat, Industry Department and District Collectors would identify suitable land for the establishment of Tourism units. II. Land so identified shall be set apart and reserved for tourism units under intimation to the Tourism Department. Information of such Land Bank would be made available on the website of concerned Local Body/ District Collector/Revenue Department and on Tourism Department website. III. The maximum and minimum land areas to be reserved for tourism units shall be as under: S. No. Category Minimum Land Area Maximum Land Area 1. Budget Hotels and 1 to 3 Star Hotels 1,200 sqm Upto 4,000 sqm 2. 4 Star Hotels 6,000 sqm Upto 12000 sqm 3. 5 Star & above Hotels 18,000 sqm Upto 40,000 sqm 4. Other Tourism Units - As per requirement/ availability 08 Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015 IV. The allotment of such land shall be made on the prevailing DLC rate of the local area. V. The process of competitive bidding and allotment for such tourism units on DLC rate for the local area shall be as follows: a. The Authority Concerned shall notify to public through national and state level advertisements for allotment of land identified and reserved for tourism units through competitive bidding process. The DLC rate for the local area for allotment of land shall be indicated in the advertisement and this price shall be the base price for allotment of land. b. In case more than one applicant apply for the land within the specified time period, the allotment of land shall be made through competitive bidding. In case no other application is received in the specified time period, the allotment of land, shall be made to the single bidder on the prevailing DLC rate for the local area, in keeping with the other provisions of the Tourism Unit Policy. c. Land made available under this Policy cannot be used for any other purpose for at least 30 years. 4. Conversion of Land for Tourism Units No conversion charges shall be payable for land held by tenant for establishment of a tourism unit in urban as well as in rural areas. No development charges shall be payable by Tourism Units. Necessary notification/orders in this regard shall be issued by concerned Departments. In addition to free of cost conversion and development charges for heritage hotels, UDH & LSG, Panchayati Raj, Revenue Department, etc. will also issue conversion orders for existing and operating heritage hotels/buildings. Similar order will also be issued for those who intend to convert heritage buildings in to heritage hotels after issue of this Policy. 09 Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015 The following additional provisions are being provided for: (A) Fixing of Time limits for Conversion of Land and Approval of Building Plans: I. Conversion of Land in Urban Area: The competent authority shall dispose off an application for conversion of land for tourism unit within 60 days from the date of filing of application which is complete in all respects. In case orders for conversion of land are not issued within prescribed time limit, the land in question will be regarded as deemed converted. II. Approval of Building Plans: The competent Authority to approve the building plan in urban area shall dispose of the application within 60 days of receipt of application complete in all respects. Similarly, time limits are also fixed for construction and operation of tourism units by the investor, which are as under: i. A tourism unit having less than 200 rooms will be required to be completed within 3 years after conversion of land. In case there is a requirement for seeking approval of building plan, the above permitted time period for completion of tourism unit will commence from the date of approval of building plans by the concerned authority. ii. A tourism unit having more than 200 rooms will be required to be completed within 4 years after conversion of land. In case there is a requirement for seeking approval of building plan, the above permitted time period for completion of tourism unit will commence from the date of approval of building plans by the concerned authority. Provided further that an extension of one more year could be given based on merits of the case by the authorities concerned after which all concessions shall stand withdrawn/ lapsed. III. Conversion of Land in Rural Area: The competent authority shall dispose off an application for conversion of land within 45 days from the date of filing of application complete in all respects. Similarly, time limits are also fixed for construction and operation of tourism units by the investor, which are as under: 10 Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015 i. A tourism unit having less than 200 rooms will be required to be completed within 3 years after conversion of land. ii. A tourism unit having more than 200 rooms will be required to be completed within 4 years after conversion of land. An extension of one year could be given based on merits of the case by the authorities concerned after which all concessions shall stand withdrawn/lapsed and the applicant shall have to register again. In case orders for conversion of land are not issued within prescribed time limit, the land in question will be regarded as deemed converted. (B) Conversion of Residential Land and Heritage Properties into Hotels and other Tourism Units No fee for change in land use for conversion of residential land and heritage properties into hotels and other tourism units shall be charged. (C) Heritage hotels situated on narrow roads in urban areas which arrange for a dedicated alternative parking on a 40/60 feet wide road and provide for the park-and- ride system from hotel to parking place, shall be permitted to operate. Similarly heritage hotels situated on narrow roads in Rural and Panchayat/Rural Abadi Areas will be permitted to operate. The same shall be applicable for existing heritage buildings proposed to be used as heritage hotels. (D) Minimum Road Width: New tourism units in rural and Panchayat areas shall be permitted provided there is availability of a 30 feet wide road. (E) Permissible Area for Commercial Use by Heritage Properties: Heritage hotels can commercially convert maximum of 1000 sq meters or 10% of plinth area of the existing heritage building, whichever is less. (F) Issue of Patta for Heritage Properties: Owners of heritage properties who do not have a legal Patta for claiming ownership of those Heritage properties would be given lease/free hold rights by the Municipality in accordance with the Rajasthan Municipalities (surrender of non-agricultural land and grant of freehold lease) Rules, 11 Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015 2015 issued vide notification no. F8 (G) Rules/2015/7960 dated 15.06.2015 by the LSG Department (refer www.rajasthantourism.gov.in). Panchayati Raj Department will formulate rules for issuance of Patta for heritage properties in Rural Abadi area. (G) Lease Amount: After conversion of land, lease amount for tourism units in urban areas will be charged on rates prescribed for Institutional purposes. (H) Urban Development Tax: For heritage hotels, UD Tax shall be charged on residential rates on the built up area but there will be no UD Tax on open area. For budget and 1 to 3 star hotels, UD Tax shall be charged on residential rates on the built up area. For 4 & 5 star hotels, UD Tax shall be charged on double of residential rates on the built up area. But for open area of these hotels, UD Tax will be charged at the rate of 50% of residential rates. (I) BSUP Charge: Basic Services for Urban Poor (BSUP) charges for heritage hotels would be charged only for the covered area. For all other tourism units, BSUP will be applicable as per existing Urban Development and Housing and LSG Department guidelines. 5. Floor Area Ratio (FAR) Under the Tourism Unit Policy, 2007, double FAR was available for tourism units in newly developed and new township areas. At present, standard FAR is 1.33 without betterment levy, and maximum FAR is 2.25 with Betterment Levy is permissible. Tourism units covered under this Policy shall be allowed double FAR i.e. 4.50, out of which 2.25 shall be without betterment levy. Rate for betterment levy shall be calculated on the basis of residential reserve price of the area. 6. Regularization of Existing Hotel Units (A) There are some heritage properties and residential land and buildings that are running and operating as hotels or other tourism units without permission. If land and buildings are being used as hotels and tourism units without prior permission, the same shall be regularized under Rule 13 of Rajasthan Municipality (Change in Land Use) Rules 2010. Separate orders will be issued in this regard by the UDH & LSG Department. 12 Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015 (B) Panchayati Raj Department will formulate rules for regularisation of existing heritage hotels in rural (Abadi) areas, and also for other existing heritage buildings which may be used as heritage hotels in future. 7. Fiscal Benefits and Incentives (A) All fiscal benefits as provided in Rajasthan Investment Promotion Scheme, 2014 (RIPS- 2014) for the Tourism Sector Enterprises shall be available to the eligible tourism units. (B) The projects approved by the Ministry of Tourism, Government of India, if eligible under the provision of the Rajasthan Investment Promotion Scheme, 2014 (RIPS-2014), shall be allowed to avail the benefits as provided under RIPS-2014. 8. Incentives for Skill Development All Tourism Units registered with the Department of Tourism will be directly eligible to become training partners under the Employment Linked Skill Training Program (ELSTP) subject to availability of infrastructure as per the guidelines of Rajasthan Skill and Livelihoods Development Corporation (RSLDC). If enrolled as a training partner, management of the respective hotels would be required to set up a training center within the hotel premises using existing/additional infrastructure for the selected courses from the approved list of RSLDC, mobilise youth for training, organize training as per syllabus, follow RSLDC guidelines while conducting of skill training programmes, participate in third party assessment and certification process, etc. Moreover, they would also have to ensure that at least 50% of the trained youth is linked to employment in accordance with the norms of Employment Linked Skill Training Programmes (ELSTP). Heritage hotels, on hiring trained youth (certified under RSLDC) would be eligible to get subsidies/incentives as per norms, if available. 9. Time Period of Licenses for Tourism Units All concerned Departments shall issue orders extending duration of annual licenses required to operate hotels and other tourism units for a period of ten years in the first instance itself. 13 Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015 10. Constitution of Tourism Advisory Committee A Tourism Advisory Committee will be constituted to give suggestions regarding measures that can be taken up for growth of tourism in the State. The Committee will also include representatives from tourism & travel trade. 11. Nodal Department Department of Tourism shall be the nodal department for infrastructural development of tourism units. 12. Policy Period This Policy will remain in force for five years from the date of issue. However, tourism unit projects already approved by the Tourism Department under Tourism Unit Policy, 2007 but are pending for land conversion/approval of building plan/regularisation before the competent authority will not be required to apply afresh. Such units shall receive all incentives and concessions granted under Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy, 2015 and RIPS-2014. 13. Implementation of the Policy In case concerned Departments require amendments in their respective rules/sub-rules and notifications for implementation of this Policy, the same can be done after obtaining approval of Hon’ble Chief Minister, Rajasthan, who has been authorized in this regard by the Cabinet Order No. 103/2015 dated 18/5/2015. 14 Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015 Annex-1 Relevant Excerpts from Rajasthan Investment Promotion Scheme, 2014 In order to promote investment in the State of Rajasthan, and to generate employment opportunities through such investment, the State Government of Rajasthan, in public interest, hereby issues “The Rajasthan Investment Promotion Scheme, 2014” (RIPS-2014) (hereinafter referred to as “the Scheme”). The Scheme shall promote investment made by Enterprise(s) for establishment of new unit and/or investment made by the existing Enterprise(s) for expansion and/or investment made for revival of sick enterprise. 1. Operative Period The Scheme shall come into effect from the date of issuance of this order and shall remain in force up to 31st March 2019. 2. Definitions (xxi) “Manufacturing Enterprise” means an enterprise employing plant and machinery in processing of goods which brings into existence a commercially different and distinct commodity and shall include an enterprise in the tourism sector, but shall not include such processing as may be specified by the State Government by an order; (xxxviii) “Tourism Sector” means: (a) A hotel or motel making minimum investment of rupees five crore and having accommodation of minimum 20 let-able rooms; or (b) A heritage hotel, certified as such by the Ministry of Tourism, Government of India and/or by the Department of Tourism, Government of Rajasthan; or (c) Or any other immovable tourism unit other than a restaurant, defined as such under the Tourism Policy of the State, subject to the condition that it shall be eligible for only such benefits as may be granted to it by the State Empowered Committee. 15 Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015 3. Applicability of the Scheme Subject to clause 3.3 below, the Scheme shall be applicable to the following classes of enterprise(s) and investment, excluding investment mentioned in Annexure- I, appended to the Scheme: (i) New and existing enterprises making investment for setting up new units; (ii) Existing enterprise making investment for expansion; and (iii) Sick enterprises making investment for its revival: provided that the enterprise shall commence commercial production or operation during the operative period of the Scheme. Notwithstanding anything contained in clause 3.1 above, the State Government, on the recommendation of the State Empowered Committee (SEC), may grant the benefit of the Scheme to the first manufacturing enterprise, investing Rs.250 crore or more in a block notified as a most backward area, provided that the investment is not relating to entry number 1 and 4 of Annexure I, appended to the Scheme. The Scheme shall not be applicable to an enterprise if its commercial production or operation has commenced before the issuance of this order or an entitlement certificate or any order or any customized package has been issued to provide any incentive or benefit under RIPS 2010 or any other scheme or policy or otherwise for such unit. 4. Benefits to Manufacturing Enterprises An eligible manufacturing enterprise shall be granted benefits and incentives as given below: (i) Investment subsidy of 30% of VAT and CST which have become due and have been deposited by the enterprise for seven years. (ii) Employment Generation Subsidy up to 20% of VAT and CST which have become due and have been deposited by the enterprise, for seven years. (iii) Exemption from payment of 50% of Electricity Duty for seven years, provided that for enterprises engaged in tourism sector, it shall be restricted to 25% of the Electricity Duty; 16 Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015 (iv) Exemption from payment of 50% of Land Tax for seven years; (v) Exemption from payment of 50% of Mandi Fee for seven years; (vi) Exemption from payment of 50% of Stamp Duty on purchase or lease of land and construction or improvement on such land; and (vii) Exemption from payment of 50% of conversion charges payable for change of land use. 5. Benefits to Service Enterprises An eligible service enterprise shall be granted benefits and incentives as given below: (i) Reimbursement of 50% of amount of VAT paid on purchase of plant and machinery or equipment for a period up to seven years from date of issuance of the entitlement certificate, provided that for enterprises engaged in providing entertainment, the reimbursement shall be restricted to 25% of such amount of VAT paid; (ii) Exemption from payment of 50% of Entertainment Tax for seven years; (iii) Exemption from payment of 50% of Electricity Duty for seven years, provided that for enterprises engaged in providing entertainment, it shall be restricted to 25% of the Electricity Duty; (iv) Exemption from payment of 50% of Land Tax for seven years; (v) Exemption from payment of 50% of Stamp Duty on purchase or lease of land and construction or improvement on such land; and (vi) Exemption from payment of 50% of conversion charges payable for change of land use. 6. Special Provisions for Women, Scheduled Castes, Scheduled Tribes and Persons with Disability Enterprise Eligible Women/Schedule Caste (SC)/Schedule Tribe (ST)/Person with disability (PwD) enterprises shall in addition to the benefits specified in other clauses of the Scheme, be eligible to avail the following additional benefits: (i) A manufacturing enterprise shall get additional Investment subsidy to the extent of 17 Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015 10% of VAT and CST which have become due and have been deposited by the enterprise; (ii) A service enterprise shall get additional 10% reimbursement of VAT paid on the plant and machinery or equipment for a period up to seven years from date of issuance of the entitlement certificate for this purpose. 7. Benefits to Enterprises in Backward and Most Backward Areas An eligible enterprise, other than a cement manufacturing enterprise, making investment in a backward area or a most backward area shall be granted the same benefits as would have been applicable if the enterprise was located elsewhere in the state but the period of benefit, except for interest subsidy, shall be extended to ten years. Provided that the State Government may, on the recommendation of the State Empowered Committee (SEC), grant to a manufacturing enterprise, other than a cement manufacturing enterprise and a service enterprise making an investment in a backward area, such benefits as mentioned in clauses 7.2 and 7.3 respectively, which are applicable for investments in most backward areas, with a view to attract investment in the backward area. A manufacturing enterprise, other than a cement manufacturing enterprise, making investment in a most backward area shall, in addition to benefits under clause 7.1 above, get additional investment subsidy of 20% of the VAT and CST which have become due and have been deposited by the enterprise for a period of seven years. 7.3 A service enterprise making investment in a backward area shall, in addition to benefits mentioned in other clauses of the Scheme, get additional 10% reimbursement of VAT paid and a service enterprise making investment in a most backward area shall, in addition to benefits mentioned in other clauses of the Scheme, get additional 20% reimbursement of VAT paid on the plant and machinery or equipment for a period up to seven years from the date of issuance of the entitlement certificate for this purpose. 18 Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015 8. Power to Grant Customized Package Notwithstanding anything contained in the Scheme, the State Government, on the recommendation of State Empowered Committee (SEC), may grant a customized package under section 11 of the Rajasthan Enterprises Single Window Enabling and Clearance Act, 2011, to the following manufacturing enterprises, other than cement manufacturing enterprises: (a) Enterprises investing more than Rs500 crore or providing employment to more than 500 persons; or (b) Enterprises investing more than Rs100 crore and using the mineral mentioned in Annexure-III appended to the Scheme, as raw material. Notwithstanding anything contained in the Scheme, the State Government may grant a customized package to the service enterprises investing more than Rs200 crore or providing employment to more than 500 persons. 9. Benefits to Manufacturing Enterprises in Thrust Sectors Notwithstanding anything contained in the Scheme, the State Government may grant a special package of incentives and exemptions, which may be over and above the incentives and exemptions under Clauses 4 to 7 to a manufacturing enterprise in a thrust sector in addition to the thrust sectors mentioned in sub-clauses 9.3 to 9.12 9.2. Manufacturing enterprises in the sectors mentioned hereunder shall be allowed benefits mentioned in this clause, in addition to benefits related to tax exemptions mentioned at (iii) to (vii) of clause 4 and benefits mentioned in clauses 6 and 7, if applicable, subject to conditions, mentioned against the sector: Provided that an enterprise of power loom sector and textile sector may opt for benefits provided in clause 4 to 7, if applicable, in lieu of the benefits mentioned in this clause. Tourism Sector Enterprises of the tourism sector covered under sub-clause (a) and (b) of clause 2 (xxxviii) of the Scheme shall be granted the following benefits: (a) Investment Subsidy of 50% of VAT and CST which have become due and have 19 Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015 been deposited by the enterprise for seven years; (b) Employment Generation Subsidy up to 10% of VAT and CST which have become due and have been deposited by the enterprise, for seven years; (c) Reimbursement of 25% of amount of VAT paid on purchase of plant and machinery or equipment for a period up to seven years from the date of issuance of the entitlement certificate; (d) Exemption from payment of 50% of Entertainment Tax for seven years; (e) Exemption from payment of 100% of Luxury Tax for seven years; (f) Land allotment in urban and rural areas at DLC rates; (g) 25% additional exemption from payment of stamp duty chargeable on the instrument of purchase or lease of more than 100 years old heritage property in the State, for the purpose of hotel development under the Scheme declared by the Tourism Department as provided in notification no. F.12 (20) FD/Tax/2005-219 of 24.03.2005; and (h) 50% additional exemption from payment of conversion charges for heritage property converted into a heritage hotel. Notwithstanding anything contained in the Scheme, an enterprise making investment in the tourism sub-sector defined under sub-clause (c) of clause 2 (xxxviii) of the Scheme shall be granted the benefits, as may be provided to it by the State Empowered Committee. 14.8 Terms & Conditions a. Benefits under the Scheme can only be availed if, and as long as there is, and for the period/s, consent to "operate", wherever applicable, from Central/Rajasthan State Pollution Control Board is effective. 20 Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015 AMENDMENTS IN RIPS-2014 RELATING TO TOURISM SECTOR Amendments in RIPS-2014 vide Finance Department order dated 07.01.2015: Amendment in clause 14.8: In clause 14.8 of the scheme, for the existing expression “consent to “operate” “, the expression “consent to establish and consent to operate” shall be substituted. Amendments in RIPS-2014 vide Finance Department Clarification dated 23.01.2015: 1. Interpretation of clause 2(xxxviii) of the scheme: (b) A heritage hotel, certified as such by the Ministry of Tourism, Government of India/ or by the Department of Tourism, Government of Rajasthan; It is clarified that, heritage hotels, certified by Ministry of Tourism, Government of India and/ or Tourism Department, Government of Rajasthan are covered under the said clause without any minimum investment limit and are eligible to avail benefits under clause 9.12 of the Scheme. 2. Interpretation of clause 2 (xxi) of the Scheme: Since Restaurant are manufacturing cooked food and other eatables, therefore, it is clarified that Restaurants are covered under the Scheme and are eligible to avail benefits under clause 4 of the Scheme. Amendments in RIPS-2014 vide Finance Department order dated 09.03.2015: Amendment of clause 2 In clause 2 of the Scheme, (i) after the existing sub-clause (iv) and before the existing sub-clause (v), of the scheme, the following new sub-clause (iva) shall be inserted, namely: “(iva) “convention centre” means a covered pillar-less air conditioned hall having minimum carpet area of 5000 square feet which provides place for meetings, conventions/conferences, exhibitions and can accommodate at least 500 person at one point of time.” (iii) in sub-clause (xxxviii): (i) the existing sub-clause (a) of the Scheme, shall be substituted by the following, namely: 21 Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015 “(a) A hotel or motel making minimum investment of rupees two crore and having accommodation of minimum 20 let-able rooms; or” (iv) after the existing sub sub-clause (b) and before the existing sub-clause (c) of the Scheme, the following new sub-clause (bb) shall be inserted, namely: “(bb) a convention centre or a resort making minimum investment of rupees two crore; or”. Amendment in clause 9.12.1 In clause 9.12.1 of the scheme: (I) in sub-clause (g) of the said clause, the existing expression “; and” shall be substituted by the punctuation mark “;”. (ii) the existing sub-clause (h) of the said clause, shall be substituted by the following, namely: “(h) 50% additional exemption from payment of conversion charges; and” (iii) after the existing sub-clause (h) so substituted, the following new sub clause (i) shall be inserted, namely: “(i) 100% exemption from payment of development charges.”. Note: For procedures and other details please refer to website www.finance.rajasthan.gov.in 22 Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015 Annex-2 Special Incentives available for Heritage Hotels in Tourism Unit Policy, 2015 1. Minimum investment limit shall not be applicable to heritage hotels for availing RIPS benefits. 2. Heritage hotels situated on narrow roads in urban areas which arrange for a dedicated alternative parking on a 40/60 feet wide road and provide park-and-ride system from hotel to parking place, shall be permitted to operate on such roads. 3. Similarly, heritage hotels situated on narrow roads in Rural /Rural Abadi areas will be permitted to operate. 4. These provisions shall also be applicable for existing heritage buildings proposed to be used as heritage hotels in future. 5. Concernd Departments will issue conversion orders for existing and operating heritage hotels/building. Similar order will also be issued for those which intend to operate heritage buildings as heritage hotels after issue of this Policy. 6. For Rural (Abadi) areas, Panchayati Raj Department will formulate rules for regularization of existing Heritage Hotels and also other existing Heritage buildings which may be used as heritage hotels in future. 7. Heritage hotels will be allowed to convert a maximum of 1000 square metres or 10% of plinth area, whichever is less for commercial use. 8. Additional exemption of 25% on Stamp Duty will be available for more than 100 years old heritage properties as per the scheme declared by the Department of Tourism as provided in the Finance Department notification No.F.12(20) FD/ Tax/ 2005-2019 dated 24.03.2005. 9. Basic Service for Urban Poor (BSUP) charges shall be levied only on the constructed area of Heritage hotels. 10. Heritage Hotels approved by Ministry of Tourism, Government of India/ Government of Rajasthan shall be eligible for all benefits under RIPS. 23 Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015 FINANCE DEPARTMENT (TAX DIVISION) ORDER Jaipur, April 10, 2015 In exercise of the powers conferred by clause 16 read with sub-clause (c) of clause 9.12.1 of the Rajasthan Investment Promotion Scheme - 2014 (hereinafter referred to as ”the Scheme”). The State Government hereby, clarifies that the reimbursement of 25% of amount of VAT paid on purchase of plant and machinery or equipment to a tourism sector enterprise as defined under the scheme shall be allowed on the purchase of goods mentioned in the list given below, in accordance with the provisions of the scheme. LIST S.No. Particulars 1. AC Plants, ACs, Fans & Exhaust Fans, Coolers etc. 2. Pollution control machines for air, water and light 3. Non CFC equipment for refrigeration and air conditioning and other Eco-friendly measures and initiatives. 4. DG Sets 5. Housekeeping machines & equipments. 6. Solar Heaters and Solar Plants/Geysers/Cold & Hot Running water machine 7. Furniture 8. Lifts & Elevators 9. Metal detectors (door frame or hand held) 10. CCTV 11. X-Ray Machine 12. Under belly scanners to screen vehicles 13. Smoke detectors 14. Heating and Cooling systems, machines & plants 15. Safe keeping / in room safe 16. Minibar / Fridge 17. TV 18. Dry-cleaning / laundry related equipment 19. Tea / Coffee making machines, equipments etc. Note: Goods mentioned above shall be allowed one time for initial set up including the goods mentioned at S.No. 15, 16, 17 which shall be allowed one set per room. [F-12(14)FD-Tax-2012-pt-I 5] By order of the Governor (Aditya Pareek) 24 Joint Secretary to the Government Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015 REVENUE (GROUP-6) DEPARTMENT No. F.11(4)Rev-6/2014/16 NOTIFICATION Jaipur, Dated: 22 May 2015 In exercise of the powers conferred by clause (xi-A) of sub-section (2) of section 261 read with section 90-A of the Rajasthan Land Revenue Act, 1956 (Act No. 15 of 1956), the State Government hereby makes the following rules further to amend the Rajasthan Land Revenue (Conversion of agricultural land for non-agricultural purposes in rural areas) Rules, 2007, namely:- 1. Short title and commencement.- (1) These rules may be called the Rajasthan Land Revenue (Conversion of agricultural land for non-agricultural purposes in rural areas) (Fifth Amendment) Rules, 2015. (2) They shall come into force at once. 2. Amendment of rule 2.- In sub-rule (1) of rule 2 of the Rajasthan Land Revenue (Conversion of agricultural land for non-agricultural purposes in rural areas) Rules, 2007, hereinafter referred to as the said rules, - (i) In clause (b), for the existing expression “hotel, restaurant”, the expression “hotel other than tourism unit, restaurant other than tourism unit” shall be substituted. (ii) the existing clause (r) shall be substituted by the following, namely:- “(r) ‘Tourism Unit’ means a tourism unit or project as such approved by the Department of Tourism, Government of Rajasthan or approved by the Ministry of Tourism, Government of India.” 3. Insertion of new rule 6C.- After the existing rule 6B and before the existing rule 7 of the said rules, the following new rule 6C shall be inserted, namely:- “6C. Conversion of Heritage Properties into Heritage Hotels.- Notwithstanding anything contained in these rules if owner of a heritage property, situated on agriculture land, applies on plain paper for conversion of Heritage Property into Heritage Hotel along with recommendation of the Department of Tourism, Government of Rajasthan, an order for conversion to this effect may be issued by the prescribed authority within the time limit prescribed under rule 9. No conversion charges shall be payable for conversion under this rule. Land converted under this rule may be used for commercial purpose up to maximum of 1000 sq meters or 10 percent of plinth area of the existing 25 Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015 heritage building.” 4. Amendment of rule 8.- The existing sub-rule (2) of rule 8 of the said rules shall be substituted by the following, namely: “(2) No conversion charges as prescribed in rule 7, shall be payable for conversion of land held by tenant for establishment of a tourism unit as defined in clause (r) of sub-rule (1) of rule 2.” 5. Amendment of rule 9.- In sub-rule (2) of rule 9 of the said rules, after the existing last proviso, the following new proviso shall be added, namely: “Provided also that in case of heritage hotels, if parking arrangement is made available by the owner in premises or elsewhere, the requirement of width of approach road shall not be applicable.” 6. Amendment of rule 14.- In rule 14 of the said rules,- (i) the existing provision shall be numbered as sub-rule (1). (ii) in sub-rule (1), so numbered, after existing expression “non-agricultural purpose” and before the existing expression “, shall be used”, the expression “other than tourism unit” shall be inserted. (iii) after sub-rule (1), so numbered, the following new sub-rule (2) shall be added, namely: “(2) Any agricultural land converted for tourism unit shall be used for establishment of tourism unit within the time limit specified as under,- (i) three years for a tourism unit having less than 200 rooms. (ii) four years for a tourism unit having more than 200 rooms. Provided that above period may, in appropriate case, further be extended for a period of one year by the prescribed authority. If the land is not used within such extended period, the conversion order and other concessions shall be withdrawn after giving an opportunity of being heard." By order of the Governor, (Anil Kumar Agrawal) Joint Secretary to the Government 26 Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015 REVENUE (GROUP-6) DEPARTMENT No. F.11(4)Rev-6/2014/17 NOTIFICATION Jaipur, Dated: 22 May 2015 In exercise of the powers conferred by section 100 of the Rajasthan Land Revenue Act, 1956 (Act No. 15 of 1956), the State Government hereby makes the following rules further to amend the Rajasthan Industrial Areas Allotment Rules, 1959, namely: 1. Short title and commencement.- (1) These rules may be called the Rajasthan Industrial Areas Allotment (Third Amendment) Rules, 2015. (2) They shall come into force at once. 2. Amendment of rule 1A.- The existing clause (viii) of rule 1A of the Rajasthan Industrial area allotment Allotment, Rules, 1959, hereinafter referred to as the said rules, shall be substituted by the following, namely: “(viii) ‘Tourism Unit’ means a tourism unit or project as defined in the prevailing policy of the Department of Tourism, Government of Rajasthan or approved by the Ministry of Tourism, Government of India.” 3. Amendment of rule 2.- In rule 2 of the said rules,- (i) in clause (a), for the existing expression “Government in the Tourism Department”, the expression “Government in the Revenue Department” shall be substituted. (ii) in sub-clause (i) of clause (b) for the existing expression “Director of Tourism”, the expression “Government in the Revenue Department” shall be substituted. 4. Amendment of rule 3A.- The existing third proviso to rule 3A of the said rules shall be deleted. 5. Insertion of new rule 3B.- After the existing rule 3A and before the existing rule 4 of the said rules, the following new rule 3B shall be inserted, namely: “3B. Allotment of Land for Tourism Units.- (1) For establishment and development of Tourism Units, the District Collector shall identify suitable land for the establishment of tourism units. The land so identified shall be set apart and reserved for tourism units under intimation to the Tourism Department 27 Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015 and same shall be uploaded on the web-site of the District Collector and Tourism Department. The maximum and minimum land areas to be reserved for tourism units shall be as under: S. No. Category Minimum Land Area Maximum Land Area 1 2 3 4 1. Budget Hotels and 1 to 3 stars hotels 1200 square meters Up to 4000 square meters 2. 4 stars Hotels 6000 square meters Up to 12,000 square meters 3. 5 Stars and above hotels 18000 square meters Up to 40,000 square meters 4. Other Tourism units - As per requirement/ availability (2) The reserve price for allotment of land set apart and reserved for tourism unit shall be equal to the rates recommended for assessment of market value of agriculture land by district level committee under rule 58 of the Rajasthan Stamp Rules, 2004. (3) Allotment of land for tourism units shall be made in the following manner, namely: (a) The Allotting Authority shall invite bids for allotment of land for tourism units set apart and reserved for tourism unit under sub-rule (1) through advertisement published in National and State level news paper. The reserve price for allotment of land shall be mentioned in the advertisement. (b) In case more than one bid received within the specified time period, the allotment of land shall be made through competitive bidding. In case only single bid is received in the specified time period, the allotment of land shall be made to the single bidder on the prevailing reserve price or the price offered by the bidder, whichever is higher. (c) Land allotted under this rule shall be used for establishment of tourism unit within the time limit specified as under,- (i) three years for a tourism unit having less than 200 rooms. (ii) four years for a tourism unit having more than 200 rooms. Provided that above period may, in appropriate case, further be extended for a period of one year by the prescribed authority. If the land is not used within such extended period, the 28 Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015 allotment shall be withdrawn after giving an opportunity of being heard. (d) Land allotted under this rule shall be used only for the purpose of tourism unit and not for any other purpose at least for a period of thirty years.” 6. Amendment of rule 7.- In rule 7 of the said rules, for the existing expression "industries", the expression "industries other than tourism unit" shall be substituted. 7. Amendment of Form-B.- In Form-B appended to the said rules,- (i) for the existing expression “Tourism Deptt.”, the expression “Revenue Department” shall be substituted. (ii) for the existing expression “Director, Industries/Tourism”, the expression “Director, Industries/Secretary, Revenue Department” shall be substituted. By order of the Governor, (Anil Kumar Agrawal) Joint Secretary to the Government 29 Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015 REVENUE (GROUP-6) DEPARTMENT No. F. 11(4) Rev.6/2014/21 Jaipur, Dates: 29.5.2015 Notification In excerise of the powers conferred by clause (xi-A) of sub-section (2) of section 261 read with section 90-A of the Rajasthan Land Revenue Act, 1956 (Act No. 15 of 1956), the State Government hereby makes the following rules further to amend the Rajasthan Land Revenue (Conversion of agricultural land for non-agricultural purposes in rural areas) Rules, 2007, namely: 1. Short title and commencement: (1) These rules may be called the Rajasthan Land Revenue (Conversion of agricultural land for non-agricultural purposes in rural areas) (Sixth Amendment) Rules, 2015 (2) They shall come into force at once 2. Amendment of rule 9: After the existing sub-rule (7) of rule 9 of the Rajasthan Land Revenue (Conversion of agricultural land for non-agricultural purposes in rural areas) Rules, 2007, following new sub-rule (8) shall be added, namely: “(8) Notwithstanding anything contained in sub-rule (3), (4), (5) and (6) if the prescribed authority, fails to dispose off the application of conversion of land for the establishment of tourism unit as defined in clause (r) of sub-rule (1) of rule 2 within 45 days of the receipt of the completed application along with required documents, then such land shall be deemed converted.” By order of the Governor (Anil Kumar Agarwal) Joint Secretary to the Government 30 Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015 TRANSPORT DEPARTMENT NOTIFICATION F.6(266)/Pari/Tax/Hqrs/2006/8366-79 Jaipur, Dated: 15.5.2015 In exercise of the powers conferred by sub section (1) of section 3 of Rajasthan Motor Vehicles Taxation Act 1951 (Act No.11 of 1951) and in supersession of this department's Notification No. F6(179)/pair/tax/Hqrs/95/5, dated 9.3.2015, the State Government being of the opinion that it is expedient in public interest so to do, hereby exempts fifty percent of Special Road Tax payable under section 4-B of the said Act, on the air conditioned passenger vehicles, except sleeper coach, having seating capacity more than 12 including driver, subject to the following conditions, namely: 1. that the Vehicle shall be registered in the State of Rajasthan in the name of tourist transport operator; 2. that the tourist permit of the vehicle shall be issued by competent authority of State of Rajasthan in the name of recognized tourist operator; and 3. that the tourist transport operator shall be recognized by Ministry of Tourism, Government of India or Tourism Department, Government of Rajasthan, Indian Association of Tour Operators (IATO) and Rajasthan Association of Tour Operators (RATO) and approved as such by the Transport Commissioner. This notification shall have effect from 01.5.2015 and shall remain in force upto 30.4.2018. By Order of the Governor, (Dr. Manisha Arora), Joint Secretary to Government 31 Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015 uxjh; fodkl foHkkx Øekad % i-18¼1½ufofo@i-bZ-uh-@2015 t;iqj] fnukad% 6-6-2015 i;ZVu foHkkx }kjk i;ZVu bdkbZ uhfr 2015] tkjh dh tk pqdh gSA vr% bl uhfr ds vUrxZr ifjHkkf"kr leLr i;ZVu bdkbZ;ksa ¼Hkfo"; esa i;ZVu bdkbZ uhfr esa gksus okys la'kks/kuksa dks lfEefyr djrs gq;s½ dks Hkwfe miyC/k djkus Hkw&:ikUrj.k ;k vU; NwV ,oa lqfo/kk iznku djus gsrq foHkkx }kjk tkjh iwoZ ds leLr ifji=ksa ¼i-10¼61½ufofo@3@06ikVZ fnukad 24-12-2007] 16- 04-2013] 18-03-2014 ,oa 26-03-2014½ dks vf/kØfer djrs gq; fuEukuqlkj vkns'k tkjh fd;s tkrs gS% 1 gksVykas ,oa i;ZVu bdkbZ gsrq Hkwfe vkoaVu & ¼i½ jkT; ljdkj }kjk fofHké i;ZVu bdkbZ;ksa] ftlesa leLr izdkj ds gksVy lfEefyr gS] dh LFkkiuk o fodkl gsrq Hkwfe dh miyC/krk fuEu izdkj ls dh tk;sxh & ¼v½ t;iqj@tks/kiqj@vtesj fodkl izkf/kdj.k] uxj fodkl U;klksa] uxj ikfydvksa ,oa jktLFkku vkoklu e.My }kjk i;ZVu bdkbZ;ka] ftlesa gksVy Hkh lfEefyr gS] dh LFkkiuk gsrq mi;qDr Hkwfe dk p;u dj Hkwfe cSad dh LFkkiuk dh tks;xh] ftlesa fofHké Js.kh ds gksVyksa o i;ZVu bdkbZ gsrq Hkwfe dk vkj{k.k fd;k tk;sxk% ¼1½ ctV gksVy ¼1] 2 o 3 flrkjk½ ¼2½ pkj flrkjk gksVy ¼3½ ikap flrkjk gksVy o MhyDl Js.kh ds gksVy ¼4½ vU; i;ZVu bdkbZ ¼c½ bl izdkj LFkkfir Hkwfe cSad dh lwpuk LFkkuh; fudk; ,oa i;ZVu foHkkx dh osc lkbZV ij miyC/k djk;h tk;sxhA ¼l½ fofHké Js.kh dh gksVyksa o vU; i;ZVu bdkbZ;ksa dks vf/kdre@U;wure Hkwfe {ks= dk fu/kkZj.k fuEukuqlkj fd;k tk;sxkA 32 Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015 Øa la gksVy Js.kh U;wure Hkwfe {ks= vf/kdre Hkwfe {ks= 1 ctV gksVy ¼1] 2 o 3 flrkjk½ 4000 oxZehVj rd 2 4 flrkjk 6000 oxZ ehVj rd 12]000 oxZehVj rd 3 5 flrkjk o MhyDl Js.kh 18]000 oxZ ehVj rd 40]000 oxZehVj rd 4 vU; i;ZVu bdkbZ & vko';drk@miyC/krkuqlkj  mijksDrkuqlkj i;ZVu bdkbZ gsrq vkoaVu dh nj ml {ks= dh izpfyr Mh-,y-lh- nj gksxhA  i;ZVu bdkbZ gsrq vkoaVu rqyukRed fufonk ds vk/kkj ij i;ZVu bdkbZ uhfr&2015 esa fn;s x;s izko/kkuksa ds vuq:i fd;k tkosA  bl uhfr ds vUrxZr miyC/k djkbZ xbZ Hkwfe dk mi;ksx vkxkeh 30 o"kksZa rd fu/kkZfjr mi;ksx ls vU;Fkk ugha gks ldsxkA 2- uxjh; {ks=ksa esa —f"k Hkwfe dk :ikUrj.k ¼i½ 'kgjh {ks=ksa esa —f"k Hkwfe dk :ikUrj.k jktLFkku Hkw&jktLo vf/kfu;e] 1956 dh /kkjk 90 ^,^ ds vUrxZr fd;k tk;sxkA lacaf/kr LFkkuh; fudk; ;Fkk t;iqj@tks/kiqj@vtesj fodkl izkf/kdj.k] uxj fodkl U;kl] uxj ikfydk }kjk i;ZVu bdkbZ uhfr ds rgr /kkjk 90 ^,^ ds vUrxZr —f"k Hkwfe dk v—f"k Hkwfe esa :ikUrj.k djus ij :ikUrj.k 'kqYd rFkk fodkl 'kqYd ¼vkUrfjd fodkl dk;Z Hkw[k.M+/kkjh dks Lo;a djus gksaxs½ ns; ugha gksxkA l{ke vf/kdkjh dks —f"k ls xSj —f"k ¼i;ZVu bdkbZ½ iz;kstukFkZ /kkjk 90 ^,^ ds rgr leLr dk;Zokgh vkosnu izkIr gksus ls 60 fnol dh vof/k esa iw.kZ djuh gksxhA ;fn fu/kkZfjr le; lhek 60 fnol esa :ikUrj.k vkns'k tkjh ugha fd;s tkrs gS] rks iz'uxr Hkwfe Lor% gh :ikUrfjr ekuh tkosxhA i;ZVu bdkbZ;ksa@gksVy ds laca/k esa iwoZ esa 90 *ch* ds rgr~ vuqeksfnr izdj.kksa ij Hkh ;s fj;k;rsa ykxw gksaxhA ¼ii½ Pkwafd jkT; ljdkj dh ea'kk gksVy o vU; i;ZVu bdkbZ;ksa dks d`f"k@vkS|ksfxd @vkoklh; Hkwfe ls laifjorZu fd;s tkus gsrq lEiw.kZ NwV fn;s tkus dh gS] vr% bl mn~ns'; dh izkfIr gsrq mDr Vkmuf'ki ikWfylh ,oa uxj lq/kkj U;kl ¼uxjh; Hkwfe 33 Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015 fu"iknu½ fu;e&1974 jktLFkku uxjh; {ks= ¼Hkw&mi;ksx ifjorZu½ fu;e] 2010 ds vUrxZr la'kks/ku fd;k tkrk gS fd d`f"k@vkS|ksfxd@vkoklh; Hkwfe ls leLr izdkj ds gksVyksa o vU; i;ZVu bdkbZ;ksa dh LFkkiuk ij pkgs os Vkmuf'ki ;kstuk esa Hkw[k.M gks ;k Lora= IykV gks laifjorZu] fodkl 'kqYd ¼vkUrfjd fodkl dk;Z Hkw[k.M/kkjh dks Lo;a djus gksaxs½ ,oa Hkw&mi;ksx ifjorZu 'kqYd dks i;ZVu bdkbZ uhfr tkjh gksus dh fnukad ls 5 o"kZ rd eqDr fd;k tkrk gSA 3- gSfjVst gksVYl ,oa iqjklEifRr;ksa ds laifjorZu o fu;eu ds laca/k esa% ¼i½ dk;Z'khy gSfjVst gksVYl ,oa iqjklEifRr;ksa ftudks gSfjVst gksVy ;k i;ZVu bdkbZ ds :i esa ifjofrZr fd;k tkuk izLrkfor gS muds fy, i;ZVu foHkkx }kjk izek.k i= tkjh fd;k tk;sxk] ftlds vk/kkj ij lacaf/kr uxjh; fudk; }kjk :ikUrj.k@Hkw&mi;ksx ifjorZu vkns'k tkjh fd;k tkuk vko';d gksxkA ,sls izdj.kksa esa ekLVj Iyku esa bl Hkwfe dk Hkw&mi;ksx okf.kfT;d ls fHkUu gksus ij Hkh mDr vkns'k tkjh fd;s tk ldsaxsAA ¼ii½ gSfjVst gksVy ds laca/k esa izpfyr Hkw&mi;ksx ifjorZu fu;e] 2010 esa fu/kkZfjr ekun.M+ksa ds vfrfjDr ,Q-,-vkj-] ÅapkbZ] lSVcSd o Hkw&vkPNknu esa f'kfFkyrk nh tk ldsxhA 4- iqjklEifRr;ksa eas okf.kfT;d xfrfof/k;ksa dh vuqKs;rk% jktLFkku uxjh; {ks= ¼Hkw&mi;ksx ifjorZu½ fu;e] 2010 esa fu;e 13 esa xSj okf.kfT;d Hkwfe dk okf.kfT;d Hkw&mi;ksx gsrq laifjorZu fd;s tkus ds fy, vkoklh; vkjf{kr nj dh 40 izfr'kr jkf'k Hkw&mi;ksx ifjorZu ds :i esa olwy dh tkrh gS] ysfdu gSfjVst lEifRr dks gSfjVst gksVy esa ifjofrZr djus dh fLFkfr esa fodkldrkZ dks laifjorZu 'kqqYd ,oa fodkl 'kqYd esa 'kr~ izfr'kr NwV gSA orZeku esa lapkfyr gSfjVst gksVyksa ,oa iqjklEifRr;k¡ tks gSjhVst gksVy ;k vU; i;ZVu bdkbZ esa lEifjofrZr gksuh gS] dks O;ogk;Z ¼Viable½ cukus ds fy;s jkT; ljdkj dh ea'kk ds vuq:i muds vkPNkfnr {ks=Qy ¼Ground Coverage½dk vf/kdre 10 izfr'kr vFkok 1000 oxZehVj tks Hkh de gks esa [kqnjk okf.kfT;d ¼Retail Commercial½ mi;ksx Lor% vuqKs; gksxkAA 5- dk;Z’khy i;ZVu bdkbZ;ksa dk Hkw&mi;ksx ifjorZu ,oa fu;eu% dqN gSfjVst iqjklEifÙk;ksa esa gksVy vFkok vU; i;ZVu bdkbZ fcuk vko';d Loh—fr ds 34 Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015 'kq: dj fn;s x;s gSa vkSj oks dk;Z'khy gSa] rks uohu&uhfr esa ,sls gksVyksa o i;ZVu bdkbZ;ksa dk Hkw mi;ksx ifjorZu 'kqYd ,oa fodkl 'kqYd ¼vkUrfjd fodkl dk;Z Hkw[k.M+/kkjh dks Lo;a djus gksaxs½ esa iwjh NwV nh tk;sxhA ;fn iwoZ esa fcuk okafNr Lohd`fr ds Hkw[k.M+ksa ,oa Hkouksa dk mi;ksx gksVy o vU; i;ZVu bdkbZ;ksa ds :i esa fd;k tk jgk gS] ,slh bdkbZ;ksa dk fu;eu jktLFkku uxj ikfydk ¼Hkw&mi;ksx ifjorZu½ fu;e] 2010 ds fu;e&13 ds vuq:i xq.kkoxq.k ds vk/kkj ij fu;eu 'kqYd dk 25 izfr'kr jkf'k ij fu;eu fd;k tk;sxkA 6- i;ZVu bdkbZ ds Hkou ekufp= vuqeksnu] fuekZ.k ,oa vuqKs; ,Q-,-vkj- ds laca/k esa% ¼I½ uxjh; fudk; }kjk i;ZVu bdkbZ ds Hkou ekufp= ds izdj.k iw.kZ :i ls vkosnu izkIr gksus ls 60 fnol dh vof/k esa vko';d :i ls vuqeksfnr@fu"ikfnr fd;s tk;saxsA ¼ii½ 200 dejksa rd dh i;ZVu bdkbZ dk fuekZ.k dk;Z Hkwfe :ikUrj.k@vkoaVu dh fnukad ls rhu o"kZ dh vof/k esa iw.kZ djuk gksxkA ;fn Hkou ekufp= vuqeksnu dh vko';drk gks rks 3 o"kZ dh fu/kkZfjr vof/k Hkou ekufp= vuqeksnu dh frfFk ls izkjEHk gksxhA 200 dejksa ls vf/kd dh i;ZVu bdkbZ ds fy, fuekZ.k vof/k 4 o"kZ dh gksxhA ;fn Hkou ekufp= vuqeksnu dh vko';drk gks rks vf/kdre 4 o"kZ dh vof/k Hkou ekufp= vuqeksnu dh fnukad ls izkjEHk gksxhA lacaf/kr izkf/kd`r vf/kdkjh }kjk mijksDr nksuksa izdj.kksa esa xq.kkoxq.k ds vk/kkj ij ,d o"kZ dk le; vfrfjDr iznku fd;k tk ldsxkA 7- ,Q-,-vkj-% i;ZVu bdkbZ uhfr ds rgr i;ZVu bdkbZ@gksVy izLrkfor gksus ij orZeku esa ns; vf/kdre ,Q-,-vkj- dk nksxq.kk vFkkZr~ 4-50 ,Q-,-vkj- vuqKs; gksxk] fdUrq 2-25 ,Q-,- vkj- ls vf/kd ,Q-,-vkj- izLrkfor gksus ij csVjesUV ysoh vfrfjDr ,Q-,-vkj- ij vkoklh; vkjf{kr nj ds vk/kkj ij ns; gksxhA 8- ldM+h lM+dksa ij gSfjVst gksVyksa dh vuqKs;rk% okafNr pkSM+kbZ ls de pkSM+kbZ dh lM+dksa ij fLFkr gSfjVst lEifRr;ka ftUgsa gSfjVst gksVy ds :i esa mi;ksx esa fy;k tkuk izLrkfor gks rFkk orZeku esa dk;Z'khy gSfjVst gksVYl tks U;wure okafNr pkSM+kbZ dh lM+dksa ij fLFkr ugha gS] rks ,sls gSfjVst gksVYl }kjk vU;= 40@60 QqV lM+d ij MsMhdsVsM ikfdZax miyC/k djk;s tkus rFkk ikfdZax LFky ls gksVy rd ikdZ ,.M jkbZM O;oLFkk fd;s tkus dh fLFkfr esa 40@60 QhV ls de pkSM+h lM+dksa ij gSfjVst gksVy vuqKs; gksaxsA 35 Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015 9- ch-,l-;w-ih- 'kSYVj Q.M% gSfjVst gksVy@fjlksVZ@ekWVy@,E;wtesUV ikdZ ds fy, ch-,l-;w-ih- 'kSYVj Q.M dsoy ldy fufeZr {ks=Qy ij ns; gksxkA vU; i;ZVu bdkbZ;ksa ;Fkk gksVy@dUosU'ku lsUVj@jsLVksjsUV vFkok dSQsVsfj;k vkfn ds fy, ch-,l-;w-ih- 'kSYVj Q.M izpfyr fu;ekuqlkj fy;k tkosxkA 10- i;ZVu bdkbZ gsrq lEifjofrZr ,oa vkoafVr Hkwfe dh yht jkf'k laLFkkfud iz;kstukFkZ fu/kkZfjr vkjf{kr nj ds vk/kkj ij yh tk;sxhA mDr vkns'k jkT; dh i;ZVu bdkbZ uhfr tkjh gksus dh fnukad ls jkT; ds lHkh uxjh; fudk;ksa ¼fodkl izkf/kdj.kksa@uxj fodkl U;klksa@jktLFkku vkoklu e.My@LFkkuh; fudk;ksa½ ij ykxw gksxsA mijksDr lHkh uxjh; fudk; vius Lrj ls vU; dksbZ vkns'k tkjh ugha djsxsa ,oa mDr vkns'k dh iw.kZ ikyuk lqfuf'pr djsxsaA i;ZVu bdkbZ uhfr] 2007 ds rgr vkosfnr izdj.kksa ds fy, bl uhfr ds rgr iqu% vkosnu djus dh vko';drk ugha gksxhA jkT;iky dh vkKk ls] ¼v’kksd tSu½ vfrfjDr eq[; lfpo 36 Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015 DEPARTMENT OF RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND PANCHAYATI RAJ NOTIFICATION No.F.4( )Tourism rules/Legal/PR/2015/486 Jaipur, Dated: 10.7.2015 In exercise of the powers conferred by section 102 of the Rajasthan Panchayati Raj Act, 1994 (Act No. 13 of 1994), the State Government hereby makes the following rules, namely: 1. Short title and commencement.- (1) These rules may be called the Rajasthan Panchayati Raj (Allotment, Change of Use of Land and Regularization of Abadi Land in Panchayat Area for Tourism Units) Rules, 2015. (2) They shall come into force at once. 2. Definition.- (1) In these rules, unless the context otherwise requires,- (I) "Act" means the Rajasthan Panchayati Raj Act, 1994 (Act No. 13 of 1994); (ii) "Allotting Authority" means an officer or authority, authorised by the State Government for the purpose of allotment, change of use of land and regularization of abadi land in Panchayat area for Tourism Units; (iii) "Authorised Officer" means an officer or authority, authorised by the State Government for the purpose of change of use of land and regularization; (iv) "rules" means the Rajasthan Panchayati Raj Rules, 1996; (v) "Tourism Department” means Department of Tourism, Government of Rajasthan; and (vi) “tourism unit” means a tourism project as such approved by the Department of Tourism, Government of Rajasthan or by the Ministry of Tourism, Government of India. (2) Words and expressions used but not defined in these rules have the same meanings as are respectively assigned to them in the Act and Rajasthan Panchayati Raj Rules, 1996. 3. Allotment of abadi land for tourism units.- (1) For establishment and development of tourism units, the District Collector in consultation with the Panchayati Raj Institution concern, shall identify suitable land in abadi area of a village for the establishment of tourism units and the land so identified 37 Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015 shall be set apart and reserved for tourism units under intimation to the Tourism Department and same shall be uploaded on the web-site of the District Collector, Zila Parishad, Department of Panchayati Raj and Tourism Department of Government of Rajasthan. The maximum and minimum land areas to be reserved for Tourism Units shall be as under: S. No. Category Minimum Land Area Maximum Land Area 1 2 3 4 1. Budget Hotels and 1 to 3 star hotels 1,200 square meters Up to 4,000 square meters 2. 4 star Hotels 6,000 square meters Up to 12,000 square meters 3. 5 Star and above hotels 18,000 square meters Up to 40,000 square meters 4. Other Tourism units - As per requirement/ availability (2) The reserve price for allotment of land set apart and reserved for Tourism units shall be equal to the rates recommended for assessment of market value of abadi land by district level committee (DLC) under rule 58 of the Rajasthan Stamp Rules, 2004. (3) Allotment of land for tourism units shall be made in the following manner, namely:- (a) The Allotting Authority shall invite bids for allotment of land set-apart and reserved for tourism units under sub-rule (1), through advertisement published in National and State level news paper. The reserve price for allotment of land shall be mentioned in the advertisement. (b) In case of more than one bid received within the specified time period, the allotment of land shall be made through competitive bidding. In case only single bid is received in the specified time period, the allotment of land shall be made to the single bidder on the prevailing reserve price or the price offered by the bidder, whichever is higher. (c) Land allotted under this rule shall be used for establishment of tourism unit within the time limit specified as under,- (i) three years for a tourism unit having less than 200 rooms; 38 Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015 (ii) four years for a tourism unit having more than 200 rooms: Provided that above period may, in appropriate case, further be extended for a period up to one year on payment of 0.5% per quarter of the price of the land allotted, by the officer or authority authorized by the State Government. If the land is not used within such extended period, the allotment shall be withdrawn and price paid in lieu of land shall be forfeited after giving an opportunity of being heard. (d) Land allotted under this rule shall be used only for the purpose of tourism unit and not for any other purpose at least for a period of thirty years. 4. Change of use of land of Heritage Properties into Heritage Hotels.- (1) Notwithstanding anything contained in the Rajasthan Panchayati Raj Rules, 1996, if a person holding title or any person, who lawfully holding a heritage property, situated on land in abadi area of a village, applies in writing on a plain paper to the Authorised Officer for change of use of land of Heritage Property into a Heritage Hotel along with title document and recommendation of the Department of Tourism, Government of Rajasthan, an order for change of use of land may be issued by the Authorised Officer. No charges shall be payable for change of use of land under this rule. The Heritage property allowed to be used as a Heritage Hotel under this rule may be used for commercial purpose up to maximum of 1000 sq. meters or 10 percent of plinth area of the existing heritage building whichever is less. (2) Change of use of land for the purpose of establishment of Hertage Hotel shall be permitted if there is 30 feet wide approach road is available: Provided that in case of Heritage Hotels, if parking arrangement is made available by the owner in premises or elsewhere and arrange for a dedicated alternative parking on a 40/60 feet wide road and provide for the park-and-ride system from hotel to parking place, the requirement of width of approach road shall not be applicable. (3) The person allowed to use for setting up of a Heritage Hotel under sub-rule (1) shall setup that Heritage Hotel within a period of three years: Provided that the said period may be extended by the State Government for a period of one year on the application of the person who was permitted to setup Heritage Hotel. If the said heritage property is not use within such extended period, the order permitting to setup Heritage Hotel shall be withdrawn or revoked by the Authorised Officer. (4) Notwithstanding anything contained in sub-rule (1), if the Authorised Officer, fails to 39 Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015 dispose off the application for change of use of land for the establishment of Heritage Hotel within fourty five days from the date of the receipt of the completed application along with required documents, then such change of use of land shall be deemed as allowed. 5. Change of use of land or tourism units.- (1) When any person lawfully holding abadi land in a village intend to use the same for establishment of a tourism unit, he may do so after seeking permission of the Authorised Officer. (2) Change of use of land for the purpose of establishment of tourism units shall be permitted if there is 30 feet wide approach road is available. (3) No charges for change of use of land for Tourism Unit shall be payable. (4) The person allowed to set up a tourism unit under sub-rule (1) shall establish that Tourism Unit within a period of three years: Provided that the said period may be extended by the State Government for a period of one year on the application of the person who was permitted to use the land for Tourism Unit. If the said land is not use within such extended period, the order permitting change of use of land shall be withdrawn or revoked by the Authorised Officer. (5) Notwithstanding anything contained in sub-rule (1), if the Authorised Officer, fails to dispose of the application for change of use of land for the establishment of tourism unit as defined in rule 2 within fourty five days from the date of the receipt of the completed application along with required documents, then such change of use of land shall be deemed as allowed. 6. Regularization of existing heritage Hotels.- If a person holding title or any person, who lawfully holding a heritage property and residential land and building that are running and operating as hotels without permission, situated on abadi area of a village before the commencement of the Rajasthan Panchayati Raj (Amendment) Ordinance, 2015 (Ordinance No. 3 of 2015) and fulfill the requirements as mentioned in rule 4 above, applies on plain paper for regularization of Change of use of land along with title document and recommendation of the Department of Tourism, Government of Rajasthan, an order for regularization of change of use of land may be issued by the Authorised Officer. By order of the Governor, (S. K. Solanki) Joint Secretary to the Government 40 Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015 jktLFkku ljdkj Lok;Ùk 'kklu foHkkx] jkt0 t;iqjA Øekad% i-8¼x½ ¼ ½fu;e@Mh,ych@15@12974 fnukad % 14@10@15 vkns’k jkT; ljdkj }kjk jktLFkku uxjikfydk vf/kfu;e] 2009 dh /kkjk 337 ¼1½ }kjk iznr 'kfDr;ksa dk iz;ksx djrs gq;s uxjh; fudk;ksa }kjk gksVy o jsLVksjsUV vkfn ds fy;s Qk;j ,u-vks-lh- ,d o"kZ dh vof/k ds LFkku ij nl o"kZ rd dh vof/k ds fy, tkjh fd;s tkus gsrq ,rn~}kjk Lohd`fr iznku dh tkrh gSA lacaf/kr LFkkuh; fudk; gksVy ,oa jsLVksjsUV ds ekeyksa esa nl o"kZ rd vof/k ds fy, Qk;j ,u-vks-lh- tkjh dj ldsxasA ,u-vks-lh- vof/k ds nkSjku Qk;j laca/kh okafNr fofHkUu ekin.Mksa ds fujh{k.k dh 'kfDr;ka lacaf/kr LFkkuh; fudk; esa fufgr gksxhA vkSj le; le; ij l{ke vf/kdkjh }kjk budk fujh{k.k fd;k tk ldsxkA jkT;iky dh vkKk ls] g- ¼iq:"kksÙke fc;k.kh½ funs’kd ,oa la;qDr 'kklu lfpo Øekad% i-8¼x½ ¼ ½fu;e@Mh,ych@15@12975&13355 fnukad % 14@10@15 izfrfyfi lwpukFkZ ,oa vko’;d dk;Zokgh gsrq izsf"kr gS%& 1- futh lfpo] ekuuh; ea=h egksn;] Lok;Ùk 'kklu foHkkx jkt0 t;iqjA 2- futh lfpo] izeq[k 'kklu lfpo] Lok;Ùk 'kklu foHkkx t;iqjA 41 Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015 3- futh lfpo] izeq[k 'kklu lfpo] i;ZVu foHkkx] jkt0 t;iqjA 4- ekgikSj@lHkkifr@v/;{k] uxj fuxe@ifj"kn@ikfydk,a] leLr jktLFkkuA 5- vk;qDr@vf/k’kk"kh vf/kdkjh uxj fuxe@ifj"kn@ikfydk,a] leLRk jktLFkkuA 6- v/kh{kd] jktdh; eqnz.kky;] jkt0 t;iqj dks izsf"kr dj jkti= ds vkxkeh vlk/kkj.k vad esa izdk’ku dj nl izfr;ka miyC/k djkus gsrqA 7- lqjf{kr i=koyhA g- ¼v’kksd dqekj flag½ ofj"B la;qDr fof/k ijke’khZ 42 Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015 jktLFkku ljdkj funs’kky; LFkkuh; fudk; ,oa Lok;Ùk 'kklu foHkkx Øekad% i-8¼x½ ¼ ½fu;e@Mh,ych@14@10838 fnukad % 14@09@15 vkns’k jkT; ljdkj }kjk jktLFkku uxjikfydk vf/kfu;e] 2009 dh /kkjk 337 ¼1½ }kjk iznr 'kfDr;ksa dk iz;ksx djrs gq;s uxjh; fudk;ksa }kjk gksVy o jsLVksjsUV vkfn ds fy;s tks ykbZlsUl ,d o"kZ dh vof/k ds fy, tkjh fd;s tkrs gS] mu leLr ykbZlsUlks dh oS/krk vof/k fu;ekuqlkj 10 o"kZ dk 'kqYd olwy djrs gq, 10 o"kZ rd dh vof/k ds fy;s tkjh fd;s tkus gsrq ,rn~}kjk Lohd`fr iznku dh tkrh gSA jkT;iky dh vkKk ls] g- ¼iq:"kksÙke fc;k.kh½ funs’kd ,oa la;qDr 'kklu lfpo Øekad% i-8¼x½ ¼ ½fu;e@Mh,ych@14@10839&11218 fnukad % 14@09@15 izfrfyfi lwpukFkZ ,oa vko’;d dk;Zokgh gsrq izsf"kr gS%& 1- futh lfpo] ekuuh; ea=h egksn;] Lok;Ùk 'kklu foHkkx jkt0 t;iqjA 2- futh lfpo] izeq[k 'kklu lfpo] Lok;Ùk 'kklu foHkkx t;iqjA 3- futh lfpo] izeq[k 'kklu lfpo] i;ZVu foHkkx] jkt0 t;iqjA 4- ekgikSj@lHkkifr@v/;{k] uxj fuxe@ifj"kn@ikfydk,a] leLr jktLFkkuA 5- vk;qDr@vf/k’kk"kh vf/kdkjh uxj fuxe@ifj"kn@ikfydk,a] leLRk jktLFkkuA 6- lqjf{kr i=koyhA g- ¼v’kksd dqekj flag½ ofj"B la;qDr fof/k ijke’khZ 43 44

Tourism Policy

Meghalaya Tourism Policy

The Tourism Policy of Meghalaya A simple plan with simple tools results in a masterpiece GOVERNMENT OF MEGHALAYA TOURISM DEPARMENT No.Tourism.74/2009/85, Dated Shillong, the 1st February, 2011 The Draft Tourism Policy which was issued by the Government of Meghalaya on 30.11.2010 through its website has received several views and comments from the general public. Such views and suggestions have been examined and relevant suggestions have been incorporated. The Governor of Meghalaya is, therefore, pleased to finalise and announce Meghalaya Tourism Policy, 2011 below, which will take effect from the date of publication. -Sd- S.M.Pathaw Under Secretary to the Govt. of Meghalaya Tourism Department MEGHALAYA TOURISM POLICY – 2011 1. Introduction Tourism in India is a growing industry, and as per World Tourism Organisation predictions, India will be a leader in using tourism as an employment generator. The State of Meghalaya must be placed in a strategic position to take advantage of this growth. Tourism being a multi sectoral activity has the capacity to stimulate different sectors of the economy. It is evident from highly developed states and countries that tourism opens up immense opportunities for economic development, poverty alleviation and income generation. Being labour intensive, it opens avenues for a host of employment opportunities. Tourism can also make a positive impact on conserving the environment, cultural enrichment, development of rural areas and empowerment of women. Meghalaya the “Abode of the Clouds” with its picturesque landscape of rolling hills, meandering rivers, cascading waterfalls, lush forests, diverse flora and fauna and unique culture and tradition has great potential for development of tourism. During the last few years, Meghalaya has evolved as a fast growing destination for both domestic and international tourists. The first Tourism Policy was framed in the year 2001 which was published vide Government Notification No.Tourism.136/96/264 dated 15th February 2001. With the evolving role of the tourism sector as a major engine of economic growth, it was felt necessary to revamp the existing tourism policy and come up with a new policy within which the Government helps to create the basic infrastructure for tourism development, while the private sector helps to provide quality products and offer active support services. Keeping in mind the requirement to provide economic opportunities to the local communities as also the need to preserve the eco-system and the ethnic identity of the people, the tourism policy has been designed to sustain the rich cultural heritage and biodiversity of the state. 2. Vision To position Meghalaya as a preferred tourist destination by taking advantage of its rich cultural heritage and natural beauty. 3. Guiding Principles Realising Tourism’s potential as a key promoter for economic growth of the state, the Government of Meghalaya envisages the following key principles to bring about responsible growth in this sector. The key principles are: a) Government will create basic infrastructure for tourism development and also act as a facilitator for private investment in this sector. b) Private sector will provide the quality products and offer active support services. c) Encouragement and assistance will be provided to promote entrepreneurship within the local communities in the field of tourism. Importance will also be given to tourism projects which are based on community participation. d) Tourism development will be undertaken in a manner so as to ensure sustainability and conservation of the state’s environment and natural resources. Development of tourism activities around natural resources will be done in conjunction with the relevant Government Departments and in concurrence with any laws relating to protection and conservation. Sustainable development of tourism will also help generate employment for the local people without impacting on environment and local culture. e) To encourage hotel operators to ‘go green’ by strictly adhering to minimum standards with regards to environmental performance and health standards. This will include use of renewable energy sources, overall reduction in energy and water consumption, measures to harvest rainwater, measures to reduce waste and provision of non-smoking areas etc. f) Tourism development will aim to take full advantage of the opportunities presented by strategic regional policies and development agencies such as the NEIIPP (North East Industrial and Investment Promotion Policy 2007), the State Industrial Policy, the Forest and Wildlife protection Policies, NEC (North East Council) and Ministry of DONER. It will also participate in Central Government initiatives/funding with regard to tourism. g) Meghalaya will build on its existing strengths to develop tourism by promoting a clean, healthy and safe environment along with friendly and efficient services. h) Meghalaya Tourism will aim to develop a unique brand focusing on selected niches and products in order to attract visitors to the state while differentiating itself, where necessary, from its neighbours. i) Construction works relating to tourism projects may be designed in such a way that the structure will merge with the surroundings and the natural environment of the area so as to present a good ambience, taking into consideration the need for durability and sustainability of the structure in a particular environment. 4. General Objectives After due consideration of the above key principles, the broad objectives for the development of tourism in the State are as follows: a) To establish a holistic growth of the industry with the cooperation of the private sector/community and other stakeholders. b) To develop an effective marketing strategy linked with regional and national initiatives through a collaborative mechanism to project a positive identity for Meghalaya in the national and international tourism markets as a unique and preferred destination. c) To strengthen the quality and attractiveness of tourism experience in Meghalaya including improvements to be brought about in the conservation of the environment. d) To identify and promote new opportunities for the future development of tourism in Meghalaya on a sustainable basis. e) To strengthen the cultural aspects of the tourism product in Meghalaya and to actively promote local participation, including community-based tourism. f) To develop a tourism plan in concurrence with the objectives of the policy. g) To ensure greater emphasis on capacity building/training to local youth and tourism stakeholders in the State. h) To ensure acceptable service levels, training and human resource development will be provided on an ongoing basis. i) To take full advantage of the various institutes in the state like the Indian Institute of Management, Institute of Hotel Management, Martin Luther Christian University, Food Craft Institute (Tura), to develop courses and implement training in various categories of service providers. j) To make the tourism industry in Meghalaya a leader in responsible environmental practices. k) To establish a set of best practices in the tourism sector. 5. Strategies a) To survey all potential areas of tourist attraction in the entire state in order to prepare a master plan for integrated tourism development. The focus will be on development of destinations and circuit development not only within the state but with major circuits of the neighbouring states particularly Assam. b) To create and improve infrastructure along with better management of mega tourism projects. Availability of quality infrastructure is a vital component for the development of tourism. The aim of the Department is to facilitate building world class tourism infrastructure and efficient transportation facilities. c) A well-designed plan for capacity building and manpower training will help make tourism development successful. The aim of the HRD plan will be to create an efficient and professional manpower base in the tourism sector. d) Joint venture in cases where unique products involving special proprietary information or brand image are needed to be introduced to a location. e) To include tourism as an industry so that stake holders can take advantage of the various incentives under the Industrial Policy (NEIIPP). Including tourism as an industry will increase capital flow into this sector by inviting investors and this in turn will increase the employment generating capacity of the sector. f) To identify and promote new opportunities and products for the future development of tourism in Meghalaya. The major tourism products in Meghalaya are festivals, wildlife, culture and lifestyle of the people. The State also has potential to offer new products, the thrust areas should be rural/village tourism, MICE tourism, Eco tourism, Wellness tourism, Adventure tourism, Pilgrimage tourism etc. Emphasis is on eco-tourism, nature tourism and rural tourism through community initiatives and partnerships and encouraging small and micro enterprises and promotion of self employment schemes. g) To develop an effective marketing strategy so as to project a positive image for Meghalaya in the international and national market as a unique and preferred destination to visit. The marketing plan will be developed after a thorough investigation of the tourism products in Meghalaya and the markets that Meghalaya is targeting. The plan will include promotion of festivals and tribal sports, promotion of local handicrafts and cuisine, familiarisation tours for tour operators from outside the state for better knowledge of the places of tourist interest in Meghalaya. h) Up-gradation of visitor facilities in all tourist destinations, improve information and signages. i) To strengthen the quality and attractiveness of the tourism experience in Meghalaya, convergence with other Government Departments is needed in the areas of security, air and road connectivity, health and hygiene and conservation of environment. This will include- • Launching of a state wide campaign to keep Meghalaya clean and beautiful. All stakeholders will have to contribute to this effort. • To educate and assist local communities to take up afforestation programs. • Support for programmes and information aiming to limit health and safety risks in the state including the elimination of malaria, control the spread of HIV/AIDS and improvement of road safety. • Efforts shall be made for improvement in air connectivity to the state as well as good road connectivity to all the tourist destinations within the State by actively pursuing with the concerned departments. • Protection and promotion of caves in collaboration professional and experts in the field and the local community. with j) The Department will set up an Advisory Board which will provide direction towards development of tourism industry in the State and take the responsibility of bringing in or facilitating synergy and co-ordination with other inter-related departments. k) Tourism infrastructure shall be designed in such a way that the construction will merge with the surroundings and the natural environment of the area so as to present a good ambience, taking into consideration the need for durability and sustainability of the structure in a particular environment 6. Tourism Security In order to avoid any form of harassment to tourists visiting the state, the Department of Tourism, Govt. of Meghalaya in collaboration with the local authorities will sensitise the people to treat tourists with due courtesy and decorum and also to guide and provide requisite assistance in case of any emergency encountered by them. Any complaint lodged by the tourists shall be attended to promptly so that they are not harassed. A specialised wing in the form of Tourist Police may also be created if necessary for effective security to tourists. Preventive measures, including the involvement of local communities and spreading awareness about the benefits of tourism, will be actively promoted. 7. Product Development Meghalaya will constantly aim to improve the tourism products it offers as well as build new products and services to target the different categories of tourists. An improved investment climate is a factor that will facilitate the development of the tourism product in Meghalaya. The investment climate can be improved by developing a plan for the State which will include: • identifying areas with investment potential, • identify investors that fit with the development philosophy of the state, • prohibiting certain types of activities which are environmentally unsafe. Potential areas for the future development of tourism products in Meghalaya include: • Adventure/Sports Tourism – Meghalaya has immense potential for adventure related activities including adventure sports like rock climbing, paragliding, zip lining, mountain cycling, canoeing, water skiing, etc. Some of the popular adventure activities being promoted in the state are hard and soft treks, rock climbing, boat race and indigenous sports of the Khasis, Jaintias and Garos. Caving at present is the most vibrant and visible tourism activity in the state, followed by nature walks and treks on the numerous living root bridges. While promoting adventure sports, it is important to ensure maintenance of international standards of safety, quality and service by strictly following guidelines issued by the Ministry of Tourism. The Govt. will assist educated unemployed youths through scholarships for training in adventure sports to open up a source of livelihood for them. MTDC will support and promote water sports and angling. The Corporation in collaboration with Sports & Youth Affairs shall hold annual water sport events. • Wildlife/Eco-Tourism- With a large area of the state covered under forest, Meghalaya has diverse wildlife. Apart from the well known Balpakram National Park in South Garo Hills, there are the Nokrek Biosphere Reserve (West Garo Hills), the Siju Wildlife Sanctuary (South Garo Hills) and the Nongkhyllem Wildlife Sanctuary in Ri Bhoi District. Tourism facilities are to be developed around the Balpakram National Park and in other National Parks and Sanctuaries with individual speciality which shall be integrated as a tourism product. Tourism Department to co-ordinate with the Forest Department for further development and improvement of the existing infrastructure for the convenience of tourists. Preservation and conservation of Sacred Groves to be given priority. • Cultural Tourism (Fairs and Festivals) - Meghalaya resonates with fairs and festivals which are celebrated throughout the year. The four major festivals of the three tribes of Meghalaya are the Wangala Dance (Garo), Shad Suk Mynsiem and Nongkrem Dance Festival (Khasi), and the Behdeinkhlam Festival(Jaintia). Music is an integral part of the people of Meghalaya and it accompanies every festival and ceremony. These festivals also provide a glimpse of Meghalaya’s lively collection of woven, decorative, dyed and colourful silk and cotton, their elaborate jewellery etc. More thrust to be given on publicity to make festivals a major attraction for tourists. There is a need to make them more attractive targeting tourist on well defined themes and spread over all seasons. The time and dates will be fixed and organised in a professional manner and will be given wide publicity. The calendar of events will be prepared ahead of time with the concurrence of the organisers keeping in mind its effectiveness and purpose. • Meetings, Incentives, Conventions & Exhibition Tourism (MICE) - Meghalaya being one of the preferred destinations of the North East, and with tourist arrival increasing substantially every year, the demand for facilities for MICE has also increased .The Department will take steps for setting up modern convention facilities at strategic locations. • Wellness, Health & Herbal Tourism – Spa holidays are becoming popular these days. Meghalaya has immense potential in this segment and can be a leading player in health and wellness tourism where professionally devised programmes can be initiated and delivered like yoga centres, ayurvedic treatments, rejuvenating treatments etc. • Bestowed with an abundant variety of medicinal plants, the state could promote Health & Herbal Tourism. The indigenous people with their inherent knowledge for herbal medicines and massages that provides holistic healing and rejuvenation will be encouraged and promoted. Areas and locations having valuable medicinal plants will be identified for the purpose of conducting educational herbal trails. Existing herbal medicinal centres will be encouraged in a regulated manner which shall form part of an important component of wellness tourism. • Unique Lodging Products – A variety of accommodation depicting traditional style and decor of the major tribes – the Khasi, Jaintia, and Garo to be constructed by the government or on PPP mode which will have a unique selling proposition. • Local Souvenir Tourism – Shopping is recognised as an integral part of tourism experience and a valued contributor to employment, income and revenue. Local markets held at various sites selling indigenous items will be included as an itinerary in the tourism conducted tours. The existing indigenous crafts produced by the local people such as pottery, basketry, handloom and weaving etc. will be promoted and developed. • Golf Tourism - Meghalaya has one of the oldest 18-hole golf courses in the country. The Shillong Golf Course together with very favourable climatic conditions has the potential of attracting ardent golfers from corporate houses within the country and from neighbouring countries. With improved air connectivity, this would attract high-end tourists to the state. • Pilgrimage Tourism – Meghalaya has potential for pilgrimage tourism in Garo Hills and Jaintia Hills which are already visited by many pilgrims seasonally. Promotion of pilgrimage tourism will be undertaken with basic amenities in these locations to attract more pilgrims. These amenities will be managed efficiently in coordination with the local authority. Special festivals will be given wide publicity to attract national and international tourists throughout the year. • Legend Tourism - Legend tourism is a unique venture to create an innovative Tourism product based on legends and folklores. Meghalaya is very rich in age old traditions, beliefs, and customs which still exist in various forms. There are a variety of tourist destinations from caves to monoliths, waterfalls to rock formations, each with its own set of legends. The bonding that exists between the land and people makes it all the more significant to package this most picturesque state with its interesting legends. These legends will be inscribed on stone tablets at the respective destinations or documented and printed in the form of booklets. • Heritage Tourism – Heritage Tourism is the oldest form of travel. In Meghalaya, particularly Shillong there are a number of important buildings, monuments, churches, etc., associated with well known personalities and events from the past. The Department will take steps to promote places, monuments, etc. connected with famous personalities to promote Meghalaya as a destination for Heritage Tourism. • Music Tourism – People of Meghalaya are known for their love of music. The Shillong Chamber Choir has put Shillong on the music map. Musical talent needs to be nurtured and recognised so that parents can encourage their children to take up music full time. The Department of Arts & Culture will be tapped to promote music festival in Meghalaya. • Strawberry Tourism – Strawberry in Meghalaya is an economic success history. Strawberry cultivation is enthusiastically taken up by many farmers especially in Ri-Bhoi District. Strawberry Tourism can be promoted where farm houses could be encouraged to take in guests who could enjoy the experience of strawberry harvesting. With the involvement of the Horticulture Department a Strawberry Festival shall be organised as an annual event. • Premium Tourist Destinations - This is a new area of tourism product providing clean, fresh, peaceful, unpolluted and invigorating atmosphere, such resorts to be developed for high end tourists. Constructions will be developed in accordance with the landscape local architecture and 90% green component. Traditional local material will be utilised. • Package Tours - With the objective of boosting tourist traffic, attractive package tours will be developed with the help of MTDC, private sector and travel operators. The packages shall be designed keeping in mind the varied interests and budget of the tourists which will be updated from time to time. • Cuisine Tourism - Tourism Department will organise traditional food festivals which will include ethnic food where local cuisines of the Khasi, Jaintia and Garo will be promoted. • Film Tourism - Promote Meghalaya as a film destination. Besides gaining wide publicity for the state, the local community also benefits economically from the crew during their stay. • Weekend/Day Tourism - There are many locations for weekend retreats/day trips in and around the capital viz Umiam, Cherrapunjee, Mawsynram, Nartiang, Jakrem, Mawlynnong, Ialong, etc which are popular amongst tourists. State Government will further develop these spots as well as promote new destinations preferably with involvement of the private sector on a PPP mode. 8. Village/Rural Tourism-Home Stay Village/Rural Tourism has emerged as a new concept in the tourism industry. In this context, Meghalaya is fast evolving as a responsible and sustainable tourism product with an important social objective through people’s participation. Rural tourism can be effectively implemented to boost tourism in the state. Rural tourism will ensure the dispersal of tourists from the city to villages enabling them to familiarise themselves with the unique culture and heritage prevalent so that they are rejuvenated and culturally enriched. The prime objective is to harness the vast untapped rural tourism prospective of the state so that their multiplier benefit filters out directly to the rural communities. Similar programmes taken up by NGOs and other agencies will also be streamlined by bringing them under one umbrella for convergence in the development and promotion of the product. 9. Community Participation in Tourism The land tenure system prevalent in the State is tilted towards the community with the Government having very little or no land at all. As a result the community plays a very important role in development and promotion of community based tourism. With community providing the land, the role of the government is building capacities so as to enable the local people to run tourism related projects. 10. Meghalaya Tourism Development Corporation(MTDC) Meghalaya Tourism Development Corporation has been set up for developing and promotion of Tourism in Meghalaya. The Corporation shall make efforts to increase its revenue to enable to carry out promotional activities. MTDC will organise package tours not only to Cherrapunjee but to other tourist destinations, organise training for guides, etc. The Government shall initiate implementation of online reservation of MTDC units. This will serve as an opportunity for tourist to book accommodation online for real time confirmation. The Government will continue to assist the Corporation subject to availability of fund. 11. Promotion and Investment through Public Private Partnership (PPP) Mode The Department of Tourism, Government of Meghalaya has initiated development of tourism projects following the Public Private Partnership (PPP) mode. The enormous tourism potential together with a peaceful and secure atmosphere is an ideal environment for investment in the state. The Department will facilitate the development of tourism infrastructure projects on a PPP mode. 12. Capacity Building and Training • The quality of the tourism product will be improved at all levels from management to staff services. For this purpose, appropriate trainings will be conducted under the Hunar Se Rozgar Scheme of the Govt. of India, assistance from NEC etc. in collaboration with IHM, Shillong and FCI, Tura. Improvement in service will give tourists a feel good experience inviting them to be regular visitors. • At present the Institute of Hotel Management (IHM) in Shillong offers a three year BSc degree programme in Hotel Management, Applied Nutrition, and Catering Technology. The BSc degree should be upgraded to a post graduate course to be funded by Ministry of Tourism, Govt. of India. Additional Food Craft Institutes will be set up in selected districts of the state depending on the requirement. • Scholarships would be provided to eligible youth preferably educated unemployed for undertaking specialised courses in the hospitality sector. Specific amount of fund will be allocated by the Department for this purpose. • Undertaking training needs to assess the gap between the knowledge, skills and attitudes of the service providers in the tourism sector and to determine the number and types of workers that require knowledge and skill development to meet the sector’s objectives. • On this basis, proposals will be drawn up for addressing the identified training needs of the tourism sector, including in-service training for existing employees, basic training for new entrants and courses for government officials, police officers, tour guides, taxi drivers etc. The private sector will be expected to register their employees for training. • Working in co-ordination with the Hotel and Tourism Association/ Stakeholders to introduce and monitor appropriate standards and classification systems for the tourism sector. • Reviewing the licensing and other regulations that have impact on the tourism industry and making recommendations for improvement. • Provide training and establish standards for transport operators, tour operators, guides, entrepreneurs for food and beverage and hospitality services. • Service Providers in adventure tourism, wellness tourism, etc. should have appropriate training from recognised institutes. 13. Solid Waste Management Waste is an issue of increasing importance in the hospitality industry. Government will encourage hotels, resorts etc. to preserve the environment by implementing effective solid waste management through waste minimization, reuse, recycling etc. The Department will promote awareness programmes aimed at educating and sensitizing the staff, visitors and guests about the importance of proper management of waste and introducing the system of segregating waste into different categories at hotel rooms by guests themselves. The Department will initiate a set of guidelines on waste management for guidance of all stake holders. 14. Improvement of connectivity through development of Heliports The Department of Tourism will submit proposals to Government of India for the development of heliports at tourist destinations which are not well connected by roads, etc. 15. Safe, Honourable and Responsible Tourism This involves people’s participation in issues that affect their lives and property, making contribution to the conservation of the environment, preservation of cultural heritage, consideration of the needs of physically challenged people, mutual respect between the locals and tourists, respect for the rights and safety of tourists and freedom from exploitation of both tourists and locals. 16. Incentives & Concessions to local entrepreneurs The Department of Industrial Policy and Promotion in the Ministry of Commerce and Industry has approved a package of fiscal incentives and other concessions for the North East Region viz. the North East Industrial and Investment Promotion Policy 2007. Under this Policy, incentives for Service Sector has been covered for Hotels(not below 2-Star Category) Adventure and Leisure Sports including Ropeways, Vocational Training Institutes such as Institutes for Hotel Management, Catering and Food Crafts. Other incentives are 100% income tax exemption, capital investment subsidy, interest subsidy and comprehensive insurance. The Department of Tourism will provide incentives to entrepreneurs for new projects in the Tourism sector for infrastructure development. The incentives will be subsidy limiting the amount to 30% of the project cost for approved projects within the amount of Rs 1.00 Crores to 1.50 Crores. Tourism Department will provide assistance for purchase of multi utility vehicles to approved resort owners/hotel owners/tour operators limiting the amount to 25% which will be the deposit amount to financial institutions providing loans for purchase of vehicles for tourism purposes. The Tourism Department will provide incentives to registered house owners who are willing to provide Hospitality in the form of Bed ‘n’ Breakfast in all the prominent tourist destinations. Such owners shall initially be trained and should be willing to provide the basic amenities identified by the Department. 17. Awards & Appreciations Awards will be instituted for categories like best maintained tourist spot, best innovative tourism project, best eco-tourism product, best hotel, best transport operator, best tour operator, best travel agency, best restaurant promoting local cuisine etc. as an incentive for good performance. 18. Creating a Brand Meghalaya - Cherrapunjee A brand image of Meghalaya on the lines of ‘Incredible India’ will be created by identifying a suitable tagline, catchy slogans, signature tunes etc. with innovative and market focused ad-campaigns. Proactive promotional measures will be undertaken for creating the image of the state as a safe and enjoyable destination duly supported by good infrastructure and facilities at the destination. The Department will take steps to develop a brand image for Cherrapunjee. Brand Meghalaya should portray the state’s unique selling points in order to maximize the returns. 19. Other Initiatives To ensure accurate data of tourist arrivals relating to nationality, length of stay and purpose of visit, the Tourism Department, which is at present collecting data from hotels within the city, will also include the guest houses and tourist information centres from all district offices in the state. Coordination with local tourism NGOs and SHGs with the Directorate of Tourism to be initiated at different tourist locations for provision of guides, setting up of garbage bins, public facilities for the convenience of tourists. Necessary signages, warnings and cautions will be set at all key locations and points. 20. Land Bank Land is the most vital requisite for setting of tourism units. A land bank for tourism development is to be created by acquiring land at various places. 21. Publicity Marketing of tourism products will continue through advertisements in travel magazines, leading publications, electronic media, publications of pamphlets and brochures, participation in international and national fairs and festivals, road shows, posting of information in the website and through state tourism offices (Tourist Information Centre), assistance to major festivals and organising tourism festivals within the state. 22. Implementation of the Meghalaya Tourism Policy 2011 The Tourism Department, Govt. of Meghalaya will be the nodal department for implementation of the Tourism Policy. 23. Commencement of the Policy The Meghalaya Tourism Policy 2011 will commence on the date of publication.

Tourism Policy

Goa Tourism Policy

Draft for discussion Preparation of Goa’s Tourism Master Plan and Policy Draft Report – Final Presentation and report on Module 3: Development of Draft Tourism Master Plan for Goa Department of Tourism, Government of Goa KPMG.com/in 1. This report has been prepared exclusively for the Department of Tourism (“Client”) based on the terms of the Request for Proposal dated 7 June 2013 issued by the Department of Tourism, KPMG Advisory Service Ltd.’s (“KPMG” or “we”) proposal for services dated 18 June 2013, the Work Order issued to KPMG dated 24 July 2014, and the consultancy contract dated 2 June 2015 (collectively ‘Contract’). 2. The performance of KPMG’s services and the report issued to the Client are based on and subject to the terms of the Contract. 3. This report is confidential and for the use of management only. It is not to be distributed beyond the management nor is to be copied, circulated, referred to or quoted in correspondence, or discussed with any other party, in whole or in part, without our prior written consent. 4. This report is being submitted to the Department of Tourism, Govt. of Goa (‘DoT’) as part of the ‘Final Presentation and report on Module 3: Development of Master Plan’ for our engagement of assisting DoT in the “Preparation of the Tourism Master Plan and Policy for Goa”. This report sets forth our views based on the completeness and accuracy of the facts stated to KPMG and any assumptions that were included. If any of the facts and assumptions is not complete or accurate, it is imperative that we be informed accordingly, as the inaccuracy or incompleteness thereof could have a material effect on our conclusions. 5. While performing the work, we assumed the genuineness of all signatures and the authenticity of all original documents. 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We must emphasize that the realization of the prospective data and financial information set out within our report (based on secondary sources, as well as our internal analysis), is dependent on the continuing validity of the assumptions on which it is based. The assumptions will need to be reviewed and revised to reflect such changes in business trends, cost structures or the direction of the business as further clarity emerges. We accept no responsibility for the realization of the prospective financial information. Our inferences therefore will not and cannot be directed to provide any assurance about the achievability of the projections. Since the projections relate to the future, actual results are likely to differ from those shown in the prospective financial information because events and circumstances frequently do not occur as expected, and differences may be material. Any advice, opinion and / or recommendation indicated in this document shall not amount to any form of guarantee that KPMG has determined and/ or predicted future events or circumstances. 19. In connection with our report or any part thereof, KPMG does not owe duty of care (whether in contract or in tort or under statute or otherwise) to any person or party to whom the report is circulated to and KPMG shall not be liable to any party who uses or relies on this report. KPMG thus disclaims all responsibility or liability for any costs, damages, losses, liabilities, expenses incurred by such third party arising out of or in connection with the report or any part thereof. 20. By reading our report, the reader of the report shall be deemed to have accepted the terms mentioned hereinabove. Table of contents 1. Development model Development Strategies Qualitative tourism goals • Positioning • Products • Markets Quantitative tourism goals Development principles & guidelines 2. Core tourism Infrastructure Tourism programs Investment and funding analysis Phasing Tourism circuits Table of contents 3. Support tourism infrastructure Core infrastructure Transport and connectivity Human resource and training Transversal tourism infrastructure 4. Commercialization & Promotion Tourism intelligence unit Destination C&P Products C&P 5. Facilitating Tourism policies and application framework 1. Development model Development Strategies Qualitative tourism goals • Positioning • Products • Markets Quantitative tourism goals Development principles & guidelines Key strategies for development of the Master Plan Benchmarking principles • All selected destinations are well known for their wide offering in Coastal and Sun & Beach tourism • The benchmark is based on an analysis of the official websites for each destination • It is assumed that the website is one of the major tools used by tourism destinations organizations to promote and highlight products and experiences. Therefore, we can ensure that destination website is essential to position the brand An analysis has been conducted in order to understand the key attributes in each destination website. “High presence” - attribute appears in the main page or in a highlighted area. Medium presence - navigation process through different search menus. Low presence - difficult to find or it limited availability Country Sri Lanka Bali Ibiza Kerala Maldives Mauritius Thailand Goa Nautical Tourism Core attributes Business & MICE High presence Medium presence Low presence Benchmark observations • All listed destinations are known for their coastal tourism offer. However, Sun & Beach (Coastal) tourism is not enhanced as the core attribute of these destinations. • It is assumed that the destination has “taken for granted” that tourists know about this offer and they choose to highlight other products which they want to promote. • All these destinations give high or medium importance to Culture & Heritage (except Maldives), Sports & Adventure and Nautical Tourism (except Sri Lanka and Thailand) • All these destinations present a high diversification in their product portfolio across 6-10 products with high / medium presence • Within this context, some websites concentrate their web communication in limited products to enhance them:  Maldives highlights luxury tourism  Kerala focuses on Culture & Heritage  Thailand emphasizes Shopping • Nightlife is not highlighted greatly, even in destinations like Ibiza or Thailand, famed for this feature. This could probably denote that either they do not need to promote these features as they are already well known (similar to Sun & Beach tourism product); or that they do not prefer advertising this type of product due to possible negative connotations. • Goa’s website provides a wide set of activities within the “Explore” and “Things to do” sections. The home page does not focus on specific positioning in terms of its destination or its products, “White water rafting” appears as the first highlighted product. Positioning matrix: Goa aims to become a multi-product destination, where culture & heritage and leisure & entertainment would play a major new role Coastal Tourism (incl. Sun & Beach, Nature, Sports & Adventure) Sri Lanka Bali Ibiza Kerala Maldives Mauritius Thailand Goa (today) Goa (future) Nature Based Tourism (incl. Nature Based) Culture & Heritage (incl. Culture & Heritage, Culinary Tourism) Sri Lanka Bali Ibiza Kerala Maldives Mauritius Thailand Goa (today) Goa (future) Leisure & Entertainment (incl. Nightlife, Shopping, Health & Wellness) Qualitative tourism goals - Positioning matrix – Goa’s positioning vs type of visitor High intensity Medium intensity Current Future International Domestic International Domestic Marketing Strategy Low intensity 1 Coastal Tourism Qualitative tourism goals - Repositioning Goa as a multi-product destination • Evolve from a majorly Sun & Beach tourism destination to a Coastal tourism destination Proposed evolution of Goa as a Tourism Destination • Develop a multi-product destination where Culture & Heritage will play a major role to attract both international and domestic tourists. • More diversified and quality leisure & entertainment offer, mainly addressed for domestic tourists • Nature-based tourism will be a focus product Qualitative tourism goals – Geographical markets strategy Very Short term Short term Medium term Very short term: on going/ current markets Short term: 2 - 4 years Medium term: within 5 years Keep addressing domestic market & current nationalities but with a different proactive marketing approach Higher-spending segments within the coastal tourism product with a better and more diversified offer, including culture and nature tourism Tap into the markets for short breaks and holidays with new direct flights from the Develop the cultural tourism offer of Goa to attract these nationalities. This would be the main motivation to visit India – and Goa as an extension Though most tourists would still stay on the coast, culture and nature-based tourism would be a main travel motivation for some tourists and complementary products for others. Depending on identified new opportunities, further diversify markets such as Australia, through a multi-product destination, where cultural tourism would play a major differentiation role. Middle East. Products / geographical market strategy: attractiveness levels High intensity Medium intensity Low intensity Very short term markets (existing/ current) Short term markets Mid term Quantitative tourism goals – for higher spending tourists with increased international tourism Scenarios analysed for total tourist arrivals (2017 to 2031) – Current/ Normalized/ Optimistic Current scenario Normalized scenario Optimistic scenario • Tourist arrivals calculated based on DoT statistics; change in calculation methodology not factored • Compounded Annual Growth Rate (“CAGR”) – 6.62% (1985 to 2015) • 2031 projected total arrivals – 14.7mn • Tourist arrivals calculated post the normalisation of CAGR numbers due to additional sources of information from tourist entry points being considered in arriving at inbound tourist statistics; namely • Railway stations • KTCL bus transport services • Private bus operators • Vehicle tolls on State borders • CAGR – 4.51% (2009 to 2013) • 2031 projected total arrivals – 10.7mn • Tourist arrivals calculated based on a CAGR which factors in the long term impact of the Tourism Master Plan • CAGR – 7.00% • 2031 projected total arrivals – 15.6mn • The Current and Optimistic scenarios are fairly similar in absolute numbers, however the calculation methodology of the total tourist arrivals in the Current scenario has not been uniform over the years. • These changes in methodology have affected the historic CAGR, hence a CAGR using a normalized scenario has been applied for the purpose of projections • The base for all scenarios are actual 2015 tourist arrival numbers, normalization has been conducted on the CAGR only. Focus of tourism growth will be on 1. International tourism - Limited growth and increased number of higher spending 2. Domestic tourism - Limited growth and shift to higher spending 3. Healthy mix of domestic and international tourists from 90 – 10% (current) to 80 – 20% by 2031 Source : DoT Goa Quantitative tourism goals - reducing seasonality Seasonality benchmark goals • Need for reducing seasonality – High seasonality features high congestion during peak season and lower asset utilization during periods of low demand • Benchmark Seasonality – • Jan to Mar – 25% • Apr to Jun – 25% • Jul to Sep – 15% • Oct to Dec – 35% • Methods to reduce Seasonality – • Increased utilization of Culture, Heritage, Nature, Eco- tourism, MICE and Edutainment tourism products during the non Oct – Dec periods • Increased arrivals at events like Carnival & Shigmotsav Quantitative tourism goals – estimate of revenues* Quantitative tourism goals* Today Future potential 2016 base 5,536,837 Total arrivals 2031 goal 10,730,735 Total arrivals Domestic International Domestic International Visitor expenditure INR 2,752/ day ALS 5 days Visitor expenditure INR 4,197/ day ALS 9 days Visitor expenditure INR 4,128/ day ALS 5 days Visitor expenditure INR 8,257/ day ALS 7 days Total visitor expenditure INR 9,060.21 cr Total visitor expenditure INR 30,125.71 cr Quantitative tourism goals – impact on employment and GDP* 2021 2026 2031 Incremental employment creation Employment: direct contribution 1,21,760 1,72,979 2,55,421 Employment: total contribution 3,52,463 5,00,731 7,36,483 2016 base 2021 goals 2026 goals 2031 goals CAGR 2016 - 2031 Multiplier Ratio Total contribution to GDP GDP: total contribution (in INR Cr.) 16,308 24,120 35,319 54,227 8.3% 3.32 (*) Normalized scenario (Ref. earlier slides) at constant prices Source: Tourism Sector in India, Parliament library and reference, research, documentation, and information service Quantitative tourism goals – tourism arrivals goals compared to other reference destinations 2015 (p) 2016 (e) 2015 (p) 2015 (p) 2026 (e) 2016/2026 (e) 3 Bali 4,001,000 4,601,000 7,147,100 11,148,100 Not available 4 Ibiza 2,546,400 862,000 3,408,400 Not available 5 Kerala 977,479 12,465,571 13,443,050 Not available 6 Maldives 1,303,000 1,350,000 2,200,000 +69% 7 Mauritius 1,154,000 1,173,000 1,700,000 +47% 8 Belize 316,000 315,000 450,000 +42% Principles • Elaborate a tourism development plan that is acceptable to the stakeholders of Goa, with an emphasis on enhanced quality and quantity of higher spending tourists, both domestic and foreign • Achieve this goal through a strong diversification of the tourism product using all relevant and varied tourism assets, wherever they are located • Consider the entire State as a potential tourism development area, which implies changing the past and current development pattern focused on the coast • Conserve the natural and cultural assets deemed of high value by stakeholders which act as major attractions for tourism, on the coastal stretches not yet developed and in the hinterlands • Address existing and future development requirements highlighted by creating physical plans that respond to that direction. • Phase tourism development so that there are opportunities in the near term (2-5 years) and for a 10 year period from now. • Take a broad look at sustainability, which implies ensuring low scale tourism development in the hinterlands of the State respectful not only with nature but also with the local culture, in line with the principles established in the Goa Regional Development Plan • Provide a conceptual tourism planning model that considers all these principles at State, Taluka and local specific levels. • Identify specific potential locations or locations’ profiles for redevelopment, enhancement and/or new development. • Nature sanctuaries in the hinterlands and the coast, • Pristine beaches in certain talukas to be protected from high pressure in terms of possible development through high quality offerings • Coastal areas: applies to parts of the coast, mainly in the upper North and mid/ extreme South, where no/ limited development is present. • Hinterland areas (Ghats and Midlands): Applicable for developments in designated areas to create “clusters” of nature/ culture-based attractions/ activities • Low density should also be paired with low rise buildings (Ground floor only or GF+1) • Present on the Goan coast in stretches, as well as in some urban areas • “Mass” development could be authorised in specific new designated places such as next to airport or development for specific programs Density models – Built up units (such as apartment/ room) per hectare, thus shaping the landscape and scenery Applicable to Hinterlands And Coastal Areas In some Coastal/ Urban Areas/ near Airport High density (60+ units /ha) Revised Regional Plan density targets seem to be in line with tourism needs Maximum permissible Built Up Area statements Plot areas below 350 sqm FAR (ratio) = 80 Plot areas below 4,000 sqm FAR (ratio) = 80 Plot areas 4,000 sqm and above FAR (ratio) = 60 Plot areas below 4,000 sqm FAR (ratio) = 60 Plot areas 4,000 sqm and above FAR (ratio) = 50 Source: Regional Plan for Goa 2021 Specific development guidelines for the Coast Low- Medium density resorts developed and or operated by international brands to better position the destination with sustainable projects “Marine nature and life parks” - Partially preserved beaches to offer an adapted environment for flora and fauna (terrestrial and marine). Ultra luxury Eco-Beach Nightlife/ Party Pernem Pernem Bardez Mapusa Spatial Planning focus area Bicholim Bicholim Sattari Territorial vision Mass tourism development Low- Medium tourism • “Big club” resorts • New generation campsites • Beach Clubs • Quality programmes to manage pollution levels, cleanliness and sanitation and definition of swim North Goa Panjim Tiswadi EntertainmentPonda Vasco da Gama MormuCguaolinary Ponda Sattari Dharbandora Dharbandora development Very Low density development & Protected Areas zones Festivals/ beach events Low density resorts Culture & Entertainment Luxury accommodation & High end retail Margaon Salcette Quepem Sanguem Sanguem Integrated leisure destinations – Beach access/ security/ cleaning/ quality of sea water/ toilets/ parking/ creation of jetties/ square with F&B facilities/ small markets/ watersports facilities including schools (sailing, surf, board) in some cases as part of an integrated project to welcome tourists Beach Clubs Medium density tourism Eco-beach low density South Goa Quepem Chaudi Canacona Low density tourism development & protected areas: • Hinterland areas - special interest and preserved / protected from mass tourism flows and developments. • Attractions - local flora / fauna, a proper botanic garden, new protected areas and special interest zones, marked trekking trails Pernem Pernem Territorial vision Karnataka Bicholim • Low density tourism eco-lodges with an orientation towards environmental and social promotion. Panjim Bicholim North Goa Sattari • Agri tourism can also be promoted central areas of the state. • Homestays meshing culture with tourism Adventure & Sports tourism: • Tourism activities and experiences which might cause greater territorial impact, proposaed in areas with lower environmental value. Tiswadi Vasco da Gama Mormugao Ponda Pon